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December 13, 2018

VIDEO: School opens after asbestos clean-up

A south Wales school which closed 14 months ago after asbestos was discovered has reopened.

Staff and pupils attended a celebratory assembly to mark their return to Cwmcarn High School in Caerphilly county.

They were due to return in September but the death of a contractor delayed the move.

The school has been working from a former college campus 12 miles (19km) away in Ebbw Vale since November 2012.

Jordan Davies reports.

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VIDEO: School opens after asbestos clean-up

Asbestos school open after 14 months

BBC News – Cwmcarn High School reopens 14 months after asbestos found

The school was closed in October 2012 after a structural survey found asbestos


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A south Wales school which closed 14 months ago after asbestos was discovered has reopened.

Staff and pupils attended a celebratory assembly to mark their return to Cwmcarn High School in Caerphilly county.

They were due to return in September but the death of a contractor delayed the move.

The school has been working from a former college campus 12 miles (19km) away in Ebbw Vale since November 2012.

Teachers spent the weeks before Christmas preparing for the move back to Cwmcarn, before Caerphilly council handed the keys back to head teacher Jacqui Peplinski on 16 December.

An assembly to celebrate the move on Monday will be followed by an official reopening attended by senior council members.


Start Quote

We’re back on the green, green grass of home”

End QuoteGary ThomasChairman of governers

Work complete

Chair of governors Gary Thomas helped staff put the finishing touches to preparations at the school on Sunday.

Mr Thomas, who celebrates his birthday on the same day as the reopening, said it was the perfect gift.

“It’s a wonderful birthday present for me, it’s marvellous. Everyone is up for coming back home and we are all delighted,” he said.

“We are open for business to start teaching our children again – we’re back on the green, green grass of home.”

Mr Thomas added that it had been a “difficult” 14 months for the pupils but they had been “outstanding”.

But said despite the disruption of having to travel 12 miles to school, the pupils had coped well.

“They certainly haven’t suffered as far as the academic achievements of the school are concerned. They’ve been better this year,” he said.

The school was closed in October 2012 over concerns its 900 pupils could be at risk after asbestos was revealed in a structural report.

Parents and pupils protested against the closure and there were rows with Caerphilly council over what work needed to be carried out and how it would be paid for.

Contractors were eventually brought in to remove the asbestos in June.

In July, James Paul, 26, from Abertillery, Blaenau Gwent, was working in a suspended ceiling space when he died.

It is thought he may have been electrocuted.

The Health and Safety Executive is investigating his death.

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View original article:

Asbestos school open after 14 months

Asbestos law could net Wales NHS £1m a year

A new Bill passed by the National Assembly for Wales will enable the Welsh NHS to recover the medical costs of treating diseases caused by asbestos.

Wrexham Assembly Member Lesley Griffiths has welcomed the Bill which will now complete the final stages of the legislative process and become law.

It is estimated the new law could raise up to £1 million a year for the Welsh NHS.

The Bill will place an obligation on employers who exposed workers to deadlyasbestos and insurance companies, requiring them to reimburse the NHS in Wales for the cost of treating those asbestos victims.

Hundreds of Welsh workers suffer from asbestos related diseases and exposure to asbestos has caused thousands more deaths over the past decades. The rare but deadly cancer Mesothelioma is commonly caused by exposure to asbestos and it is estimated the human cost will continue for decades with the peak in mortality not expected until at least 2015.

Lesley Griffiths AM for Wrexham commented: “The cost of treating asbestos related diseases places significant financial strain on the Welsh NHS so this Bill is a major step forward and will offer greater support to the victims and their families.”

“The new law will help raise awareness and understanding of the dangers of asbestos and improve the quality of life for those who have suffered from the terrible diseases.”

Continue reading: 

Asbestos law could net Wales NHS £1m a year

Asbestos fear at waste plant fire

From: 

Asbestos fear at waste plant fire

NBN asbestos safety breaches raise questions

A Sydney family is demanding answers from Telstra and the Federal Government over fears asbestos fibres have contaminated their home during the rollout of the National Broadband Network (NBN).

Work has stopped at some sites in New South Wales and Victoria, improvement notices issued in Tasmania, and Telstra subcontractors are being investigated for asbestos safety breaches by Comcare.

Thousands of telco-pits across Australia are being prepared for fibre optic cables, including old pits containing asbestos.

There are concerns the deadly fibres have been released into residential areas during the works.

Matthew O’Farrell, his wife and their two children aged 12 weeks and six years old have been moved out of their home in Penrith, in Sydney’s west, and into a motel after being told there was asbestos in a pit outside their home and their street may have been contaminated.

“The first time I found out that this was asbestos, my stomach sank. I’ve been on edge ever since, nervous of everything I do. I started to get very paranoid about how far this stuff had got,” he said.

“I’ve had no reassurance from anyone when we’ll be able to go back to our home, when it is safe and whether my children or wife have come into contact or breathed in any of this material.

“I just hope that over the next 20 years I’m not having to say to my children that they’ve got this from living in that house.”

‘It’s just exploding everywhere’

Mr O’Farrell says the Telstra contractors who had been working on the pit had “no idea” what they were doing and he says some of them cannot speak English.

“I’ve watched the owner of the company communicate with them from metres away with hand signals, telling them to break up the pits with their hands and putting it into bags,” he said.

“[They were] hitting the pits with sledgehammers, pitchforks and crowbars.

“It’s just exploding everywhere, all over the road, down the driveways, all over the front yards of our properties.”

‘Urgent investigation’

Telstra has accepted complete responsibility for the cleanup of asbestos found during the rollout.

Telstra chief operations officer Brendon Riley said his team reacted immediately to the concerns of residents on the Penrith street earlier this month.

“As soon as we received the information we sent our team out to the pit to inspect the site and as a result immediately suspended the contractor from further work and safely secured the area,” he said.

He says Telstra did further investigations.

“We also re-visited all sites remediated by this contractor to make sure the removal of asbestos was conducted in the appropriate way,” he said.

“I ordered an urgent investigation into the incident and my team has been liaising regularly with the local residents including bringing in asbestos experts to talk to them.

“We understand this is a distressing time for the residents who have every right to expect that this type of work will be conducted safely and in accordance with the strictest of safety procedures.”

Government taking safety breaches seriously

Communications Minister Stephen Conroy has moved to reassure the public that the Government is taking the safety breaches very seriously.

“The Office of Asbestos Safety will work closely with Comcare to address any asbestos hazards in a nationally coordinated way to protect Australians from asbestos exposure,” he said.

“This is a very serious issue and as you know lives can be put at stake.”

Comcare is investigating the work, health and safety systems of Telstra in Tasmania, New South Wales and Victoria.

The National Office of Asbestos Safety has also been called in to investigate.

Workplace Relations Minister Bill Shorten says the Government is working with Telstra and its contractors to address asbestos safety issues.

“We take any potential cases of asbestos exposure extremely seriously and a national approach to asbestos awareness, handling and eradication is urgently needed,” he said.

“There is no excuse, if it’s proven to have happened, for this to have happened full stop.

“Asbestos is a killer.

“We are determined to have a national action plan and I’ve spoken with Telstra about best practice.”

Union calls for fund for future victims

The Union representing NBN technicians is calling for Telstra to set up a fund to pay for the care and treatment of future asbestos disease victims caused by poor asbestos management on the NBN project.

CEPU NSW assistant secretary Shane Murphy wants Telstra to set up a register for all workers who have been exposed to asbestos while working on the Telstra network.

“The impacts of this mess will be felt decades into the future,” he said.

“Telstra needs to take responsibility for the health impact on its own workers as well as the broader community.”

Subcontractors are ‘cowboys’

Asbestos Diseases Foundation president Barry Robson says some of the subcontractors involved with the NBN work “are just cowboys”.

“They had no protection, the four workers [in Penrith],” said Mr Robson.

“The residents tell me they just got stuck into this particular one, some of the workers smashed it all up … asbestos went everywhere.”

Kevin Harkins from Unions Tasmania says Comcare has not been checking sites often enough.

“Hopefully this will be a wake-up call, but Comcare don’t have any officers based in Tasmania,” he said.

“We need more people on the ground inspecting health and safety risks to employees and the community.

“As I understand it, in New South Wales, a number of houses have actually been evacuated because of the dangers of asbestos, we don’t want that happening in Tasmania.”

Link to article: 

NBN asbestos safety breaches raise questions

Some NBN work shut down as asbestos safety breaches investigated

A Sydney family is demanding answers from Telstra and the Federal Government over fears asbestos fibres have contaminated their home during the rollout of the National Broadband Network (NBN).

Work has stopped at some sites in New South Wales and Victoria, improvement notices issued in Tasmania, and Telstra subcontractors are being investigated for asbestos safety breaches by Comcare.

Thousands of telco-pits across Australia are being prepared for fibre optic cables, including old pits containing asbestos.

There are concerns the deadly fibres have been released into residential areas during the works.

Matthew O’Farrell, his wife and their two children aged 12 weeks and six years old have been moved out of their home in Penrith, in Sydney’s west, and into a motel after being told there was asbestos in a pit outside their home and their street may have been contaminated.

“The first time I found out that this was asbestos, my stomach sank. I’ve been on edge ever since, nervous of everything I do. I started to get very paranoid about how far this stuff had got,” he said.

“I’ve had no reassurance from anyone when we’ll be able to go back to our home, when it is safe and whether my children or wife have come into contact or breathed in any of this material.

“I just hope that over the next 20 years I’m not having to say to my children that they’ve got this from living in that house.”

‘It’s just exploding everywhere’

Mr O’Farrell says the Telstra contractors who had been working on the pit had “no idea” what they were doing and he says some of them cannot speak English.

“I’ve watched the owner of the company communicate with them from metres away with hand signals, telling them to break up the pits with their hands and putting it into bags,” he said.

“[They were] hitting the pits with sledgehammers, pitchforks and crowbars.

“It’s just exploding everywhere, all over the road, down the driveways, all over the front yards of our properties.”

‘Urgent investigation’

Telstra has accepted complete responsibility for the cleanup of asbestos found during the rollout.

Telstra chief operations officer Brendon Riley said his team reacted immediately to the concerns of residents on the Penrith street earlier this month.

“As soon as we received the information we sent our team out to the pit to inspect the site and as a result immediately suspended the contractor from further work and safely secured the area,” he said.

He says Telstra did further investigations.

“We also re-visited all sites remediated by this contractor to make sure the removal of asbestos was conducted in the appropriate way,” he said.

“I ordered an urgent investigation into the incident and my team has been liaising regularly with the local residents including bringing in asbestos experts to talk to them.

“We understand this is a distressing time for the residents who have every right to expect that this type of work will be conducted safely and in accordance with the strictest of safety procedures.”

Government taking safety breaches seriously

Communications Minister Stephen Conroy has moved to reassure the public that the Government is taking the safety breaches very seriously.

“The Office of Asbestos Safety will work closely with Comcare to address any asbestos hazards in a nationally coordinated way to protect Australians from asbestos exposure,” he said.

“This is a very serious issue and as you know lives can be put at stake.”

Comcare is investigating the work, health and safety systems of Telstra in Tasmania, New South Wales and Victoria.

The National Office of Asbestos Safety has also been called in to investigate.

Workplace Relations Minister Bill Shorten says the Government is working with Telstra and its contractors to address asbestos safety issues.

“We take any potential cases of asbestos exposure extremely seriously and a national approach to asbestos awareness, handling and eradication is urgently needed,” he said.

“There is no excuse, if it’s proven to have happened, for this to have happened full stop.

“Asbestos is a killer.

“We are determined to have a national action plan and I’ve spoken with Telstra about best practice.”

Union calls for fund for future victims

The Union representing NBN technicians is calling for Telstra to set up a fund to pay for the care and treatment of future asbestos disease victims caused by poor asbestos management on the NBN project.

CEPU NSW assistant secretary Shane Murphy wants Telstra to set up a register for all workers who have been exposed to asbestos while working on the Telstra network.

“The impacts of this mess will be felt decades into the future,” he said.

“Telstra needs to take responsibility for the health impact on its own workers as well as the broader community.”

Subcontractors are ‘cowboys’

Asbestos Diseases Foundation president Barry Robson says some of the subcontractors involved with the NBN work “are just cowboys”.

“They had no protection, the four workers [in Penrith],” said Mr Robson.

“The residents tell me they just got stuck into this particular one, some of the workers smashed it all up … asbestos went everywhere.”

Kevin Harkins from Unions Tasmania says Comcare has not been checking sites often enough.

“Hopefully this will be a wake-up call, but Comcare don’t have any officers based in Tasmania,” he said.

“We need more people on the ground inspecting health and safety risks to employees and the community.

“As I understand it, in New South Wales, a number of houses have actually been evacuated because of the dangers of asbestos, we don’t want that happening in Tasmania.”

Read more:

Some NBN work shut down as asbestos safety breaches investigated

Asbestos concerns expose flaws in monitoring hazardous material in our schools, claim campaigners

Wales is in danger of falling down a “devolutionary crack” in regulations over the monitoring of asbestos on schools, campaigners have warned.

The Right To Know: Asbestos in Schools Wales campaign has warned existing regulations issued in England do not apply to Wales, meaning neither educational or health and safety guidance would apply.

It comes ahead of a reception held by asbestos activists in the Senedd on Tuesday to warn of the dangers of asbestos in schools, set up following the closure of a school due to a report in October finding pupils were at risk from the material.

The school is due to reopen in September after Caerphilly councillors unanimously approved £1m of work to remove asbestos from the site.

But the Right To Know campaign – which is targeting the Welsh Government and local councils – is calling for a national online register of asbestos levels across Welsh schools.

Education Minister Leighton Andrews asked all 22 Welsh councils for assurances on the content of asbestos in their schools in the wake of Cwmcarn’s closure, later saying he was not satisfied Welsh councils were meeting their legal requirements.

But he has insisted that responsibility over monitoring of asbestos in schools lies with local authorities, and the Welsh Local Government Association has issued guidelines on the management of asbestos to local authorities.

Welsh Liberal Democrat leader Kirsty Williams had called for a national audit of asbestos after the Cwmcarn closure.

The building material is known to be carcinogenic and is linked with a variety of cancers and respiratory diseases – though it can be considered safe if it remains structurally undisturbed.

Cenric Clement-Evans, spokesman for the campaign and lawyer with Cardiff-based NewLaw, said the campaign wanted the Welsh Government to take a lead on the issue.

“Now our concern is that the Guidance on Asbestos Management in Schools, issued by the Department of Education in October 2012 in England does not apply in Wales,” he said.

“As a result, there is a real danger of Welsh schools falling into a ‘devolutionary crack’ between the areas of health and safety and education.

“I would entirely agree with the international expert Professor Julian Peto who said in his evidence before the Education Select Committee at Westminster: ‘All that matters is whether or not kids are breathing in asbestos and, until you find that out, everything else is hot air.’”

Under the Right To Know proposals, parents would be able to access the database online, and check whether asbestos is present in any school, and whether an up-to-date management plan is in place where it is present.

The Senedd event sponsor – Tory Monmouth AM Nick Ramsay, who chairs the cross-party group on asbestos – said: “The Right to Know: Asbestos in Schools Wales campaign is calling for a database that would result in increased transparency, empowering parents and teachers to hold their local authority to account regarding their children and their safety while in the classroom.”

A Welsh Government spokeswoman said the management of asbestos was a non-devolved matter, with the responsibility for its management lying with the Health and Safety Executive, applying across Wales and England.

She said: “As the guidance issued by the Department for Education is based on this legislation, it can apply equally to schools in Wales.

“We are, however, currently in discussion with the Department for Education and are developing our own guidance on the management of asbestos in schools.

“Local authorities or schools governing bodies in Wales have a legal responsibility to have up-to date records on the location and condition of asbestos containing material and that appropriate management plans are in place to detail how the risks from these materials will be managed.

“Members of the public may approach local authorities or governing bodies to access this information.”

Taken from – 

Asbestos concerns expose flaws in monitoring hazardous material in our schools, claim campaigners

Asbestos Advice Helpline Backs Asbestos Law

Asbestos Advice Helpline, a leading organisation to assist those affected by Asbestos related diseases, has today announced that they fully back the newly announced Welsh law bid to recover NHS expenses from the insurers of those responsible for exposure to asbestos.

London, UK (PRWEB UK) 20 December 2012

Asbestos Advice Helpline

has today announced that they are in full support of the newly announced

Welsh law bid

to recover expenses in order to help sufferers of

asbestos related diseases

.

The bill proposes letting the NHS seek compensation from the insurers and companies who caused the exposure in asbestos related disease sufferers. This would be similar to the way that sufferers of asbestos related diseases can claim on their own, but the money would go into the NHS to help fund treatment and care for sufferers of asbestos exposure.

The proposed bill has an explanatory memorandum which states:

“The Bill’s aim is to enable the Welsh Ministers to recover from a compensator (being a person by or on behalf of whom a compensation payment is made to or in respect of a victim of asbestos related disease), certain costs incurred by the NHS in Wales in providing care and treatment to the victim of asbestos related disease.”

The Recovery of Medical Costs for Asbestos Disease (Wales) Bill has been opened to consultation after being brought forward by the Pontypridd Assembly Member Mick Antoniw. The bills aim is to gain compensation to be paid into NHS trusts to help with the payment of treatments caused by asbestos related industrial diseases and help take the strain off the already stretched NHS. Wales has a high number of asbestos related disease victims and the number of those diagnosed is set to continue for some time due to the long incubation period for diseases such as asbestosis, mesothelioma and lung cancer.

Currently, sufferers of asbestos related diseases such as mesothelioma, asbestosis and asbestos related lung cancer can claim compensation through Asbestos Advice Helpline from the companies who were responsible for the exposure. If the bill were to go through, it could mean that the burden of asbestos related diseases would be eased for the NHS, with money helping fund treatment and research into the diseases. The claim for compensation to be paid to the NHS would be made after an individual has made a successful personal compensation claim, so would not reduce the amount of a successful claim for an asbestos related disease.

Government statistics show that 4,500 people a year die from asbestos related diseases, so the addition of funding for the NHS would help sufferers get the treatment they need. It would also help the existing funding be put to different uses, thus helping everyone who uses the NHS.

If you have been affected by asbestos related diseases and feel you may be entitled to make a claim against those responsible; please do not hesitate to contact Asbestos Advice Helpline on 0800 884 0300 or through their website here.

Ian Harbridge
Asbestos Advice Helpline
0800 884 0300
Email Information

Source: 

Asbestos Advice Helpline Backs Asbestos Law

Asbestos school demolition advice

Uses of Asbestos

BBC News – Cwmcarn school asbestos: demolition suggested by contractor

Sixth formers were back in lessons in one of the school’s newer buildings


Related Stories

A specialist contractor has advised Caerphilly council to consider demolishing a school closed last week because of asbestos, it has emerged.

The 900-pupil Cwmcarn High School shut last Friday after workmen spotted the potentially hazardous material.

It partially reopened on Friday with sixthformers reporting to the performing arts centre in the morning.

Year 11 pupils return on Monday and Year 10 pupils on Tuesday. Lessons for other pupils resume on 5 November.

The locations for the remaining pupils’ lessons are still to be confirmed.

Caerphilly council has defended its actions in closing the school immediately on receipt of a structural report last Friday which identified asbestos.



The report recommended an immediate notice of prohibited access, although the risk to students and staff from fibres of damaged asbestos was said to be low.

The council has also revealed that the specialist contractors who wrote the report also advised it to “look at the abatement/demolition of Cwmcarn High School, due to the implicated costs of continuing to operate without further risk of exposure”.

The council estimates it would cost millions to remove the asbestos, but says it is considering all options.

The authority will hold a series of meetings with parents next week to provide a further update situation, including arrangements for pupils returning next month after the half-term break.

Officials and the school’s governing body are investigating a range of options for the children’s return to lessons, but it is not clear what the arrangements are.


Start Quote

They haven’t really addressed the problem – there’s still lots of questions to be answered”

End QuoteSally YamamotoParent

A statement on Friday from the school’s governing body and Caerphilly council said more than 100 sixthformers had attended lessons in the performing arts block in the morning.

It said: “Year 11 will return on Monday 22nd October and should report to the Performing Arts block at 8.30am.

“Year 10 pupils will be able to return to lessons at Cwmcarn High School on Tuesday 23rd October and should report to the Performing Arts block at 8.30am.

A special meeting of the council will take place on 23 October to discuss the issues.

The local authority has also provided guidance about the health issues relating to asbestos.

It said breathing it in may take some fibres into the lungs and breathing out will remove some, but a few fibres may be left in the lungs and, over time, as more fibres gather, this will increase the possibility that they may cause harm.

Cwmcarn High SchoolThe school shutdown without warning last Friday after asbestos was found in a structural survey

For these reasons, short term exposure to asbestos is not considered to be harmful, but there may be harmful effects of very long term exposure, the council said.

Parent Sally Yamamoto, whose daughter Nadia attends the school, said: “They haven’t really addressed the problem – there’s still lots of questions to be answered.

“But it’s not the school, it’s the local authority after all,” she added.

“The school have been really good at trying to get work out … I think they’ve really done their best.

“I think the LEA [local education authority] have some questions to answer.”

Education Minister Leighton Andrews announced on Tuesday that all schools in Wales must deliver reports on their asbestos levels by next week.

‘Massive issues’

He described the situation at Cwmcarn “difficult” and said councils had clear legal duties to do annual surveys.

Cwmcarn High SchoolMore than 900 pupils missed classes after Cwmcarn High School shut

The NASUWT teaching union said it was glad the matter was being taken seriously.

But it warned of “massive issues” about raising funds to remove the material at a time of education cuts.

Mr Andrews said Public Health Wales was providing a health-based risk assessment, and Caerphilly council was looking at a number of options to accommodate pupils as a priority.

NASUWT Cymru has asked the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) to investigate the discovery of asbestos at Cwmcarn.

The union said it wanted the HSE to confirm that correct procedures are adhered to.

The HSE has said it was looking to see whether there were grounds for a full investigation.

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Cardiff

Sunday day weather

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  • Sunny Intervals
  • Max: 14°C
  • Min: 11°C
  • Wind: ENE 10mph

Elsewhere on the BBC

  • Gaby AmarantosBrazilian blend

    Gaby Amarantos on mixing rhythms and creating her unique style of music

  • Cyclists with a disability test Germany’s Romantic Road in a scenic adventure holiday





Source article: 

Asbestos school demolition advice

Asbestos school exposure concerns

Uses of Asbestos

BBC News – Cwmcarn High School: Asbestos exposure warning

More than 900 pupils have missed classes since the school was closed


Related Stories

Staff and pupils at a south Wales secondary school could have been exposed to airborne asbestos, a teaching union official has said.

The 900-pupil Cwmcarn High School shut late on Friday after a structural report identified the material.

Rex Phillips of NASUWT Cymru has raised safety concerns, saying high levels of the material had been found throughout the building.

Caerphilly council said public health officials would report on Tuesday.

The announcement that the school was to close with immediate effect came on Friday afternoon.

The council said the action had been taken to safeguard the health and wellbeing of pupils and staff.


WHAT IS ASBESTOS?

  • A hazardous material regularly used in buildings from the 1950s until the late 1990s, especially for fireproofing and insulation. If disturbed, it can cause fatal illnesses.
  • Asbestos is a naturally occurring fibrous mineral that became a popular building material in the 1950s. It is still found in many buildings, including hospitals, schools and homes.
  • Asbestos was widely used as an insulation and fire proofing solution. In particular, it found its way into products like ceiling tiles, pipe insulation, boilers, sprayed coatings and garage roof tiles.
  • Inhaling loose asbestos fibres is known to cause several serious and even fatal lung diseases. It was banned in 1999.
  • As long as the asbestos is well maintained and not disturbed or disintegrating it does not present any immediate hazard to health.

SOURCE: TAKE FIVE AND STAY ALIVE

Education officials, teaching staff and engineers discussed the situation on Monday.

Mr Phillips said the problem was found when a company visited the school to carry out a survey on a boiler room.

He said the asbestos was found to be in airborne particles, with two-thirds of the school “inoperable”.

“They have taken the action to close the building because of that and they have virtually got a sealed building at the school,” he added.

Alternative arrangements

Caerphilly council said the latest updates would be announced on its website.

It added that it was working with the school’s senior leadership team and governors to explore alternative arrangements for pupils and staff, but this was unlikely to be resolved this week.

The authority said every effort was being made to accommodate pupils in years 11, 12 and 13 as a priority.

School head teacher Jacqui Peplinski has sought to reassure parents with a letter.

Asbestos expert Cenric Clement-Evans told BBC Radio Wales it was estimated that 75% of schools in Britain contained asbestos.

“At the time that schools were refurbished and rebuilt, or new-built after the war, perhaps up until the mid-70s, asbestos was seen as a fantastic material,” he said.

“It provided insulation, fireproofing. It was very good and cheap for us in buildings so we used a lot of asbestos and that’s why it’s there.”

Mr Clement-Evans added: “If it’s contained, the UK government’s position is that it can be managed effectively.”

And he said he was campaigning for a central register in Wales to identify where asbestos is present so that it can be monitored.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

Weather

Cardiff

Sunday day weather

Sunny Intervals

  • Sunny Intervals
  • Max: 14°C
  • Min: 11°C
  • Wind: ENE 10mph

Elsewhere on the BBC

  • Gaby AmarantosBrazilian blend

    Gaby Amarantos on mixing rhythms and creating her unique style of music

  • Cyclists with a disability test Germany’s Romantic Road in a scenic adventure holiday





Originally from: 

Asbestos school exposure concerns