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January 17, 2018

Holland man admits he dumped asbestos

Published: Wednesday, 3/4/2015

BORDERLAND

Holland man admits he dumped asbestos

BLADE STAFF

A Holland man admitted Tuesday that he removed and dumped asbestos from the former Champion Spark Plug plant on Upton Avenue.

Ronald Gibson, 56, pleaded guilty in Lucas County Common Pleas Court to engaging in asbestos hazard-abatement activity without a license, engaging in asbestos-removal work without prior written notice to the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, and illegal disposal of construction and demolition debris.

Gibson told the court he was hired to remove the asbestos in the fall of 2012 and did so even though he knew it was illegal because he was “hurting for money.” He said he disposed of the materials in Dumpsters at a Dorr Street mobile home park and an abandoned house off Old State Line Road.

Judge Linda Jennings scheduled sentencing for April 15.


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Holland man admits he dumped asbestos

Moon Area parents voice concerns about asbestos removal

Some parents in the Moon Area School District are concerned about the district’s plan to remove asbestos from two elementary schools during the nine-day spring break instead of over summer vacation.

About 20 parents attended two sessions Tuesday to discuss the removal of asbestos-containing vinyl floor tiles as part of $26.2 million in improvements planned at Allard and Brooks elementary schools.

The asbestos removal is scheduled to begin the evening of March 27 and be completed by April 2 to allow time for Allegheny County to review the project and for the district to install flooring and return furniture to rooms. The district’s spring break is March 28-April 5.

Will Nicastro, department manager with Professional Services Industries Inc. of Pittsburgh, said the floor tiling is “non-friable,” meaning it is resistant to crushing or pulverizing by hand, and it should be easily pried from the floor.

Testing and multiple cleaning processes will be used throughout each phase of the removal project, he said.

Some parents said they felt reassured after hearing the presentation, while others remained adamant that the project should be done over summer break, with the start of the 2015-16 school year delayed by one week.

School directors Jerry Testa and Michael Hauser were the only board members who attended either of the Tuesday sessions. Mr. Testa said he would prefer to delay the start of the 2015-16 school year.

“Based on what I heard tonight, I am even less comfortable than when I voted last Monday,” Mr. Testa said, referring to the Feb. 9 board meeting where directors voted 7-2 to approve plans that included the bidding of the asbestos projects. He and Mr. Hauser were the two dissenters.

It may be less expensive for the district to have the work done over spring break because firms are busy in June with summer construction projects, said Joe Kuchnicki, principal contractor with PSI.

PSI would prefer to do abatement work while students are not in building, he said, although local districts, including Montour and Mt. Lebanon, have done this type of abatement while students are in the building by closing off sections of the school from use. Doug Finke, PSI project manager, said other districts, such as North Hills, have conducted this type of abatement during weekends.

Some were concerned the time frame was too short for the work.

“I don’t want it done helter skelter,” said Basel Masry, an Allard parent. “By rushing it, you are setting it up for a fail.”

Mr. Kuchnicki called the timeline “somewhat of an aggressive schedule, but it is meet-able.”

At the Brooks session, where parents also brought up that concern, superintendent Curt Baker said, “The risk level is exceptionally low. There is no reason to put it off.”

PSI will not be the firm removing the asbestos as indicated during the Feb. 9 board meeting. It will monitor the contractors that are hired to complete the projects. Air quality testing will be completed by PSI throughout the abatement process. On-site tests will be performed before and during the project, including areas outside of the sealed work areas. Final air quality readings will be completed at the company’s main laboratory in Pittsburgh.

Open bidding on the project is to end March 2. The school board is scheduled to vote to select the firm or firms on March 9.

Further asbestos abatement, including insulation and boiler room work at Brooks and window work at Allard, will be completed during the summer. The window work will be done in conjunction with the installation of new windows.

Abatement also is expected to occur during the summer at R. Hyde Elementary in preparation for transforming it into a district learning center.

Sonja Reis, freelance writer: suburbanliving@post-gazette.com.

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Moon Area parents voice concerns about asbestos removal

Warrnambool council depot closes after asbestos scare

ASBESTOS contamination fears were sparked after suspicious-looking sheeting was thrown into a crusher at a Warrnambool depot.

The gates are locked at Warrnambool City Council’s Scott Street depot after an asbestos scare. 141212RG17 Picture: ROB GUNSTONE

The gates are locked at Warrnambool City Council’s Scott Street depot after an asbestos scare. 141212RG17 Picture: ROB GUNSTONE

Warrnambool City Council’s Strong Street depot was in lockdown yesterday after the discovery of material believed to contain asbestos.

About 20 depot staff were working in the vicinity at the time the sheeting was found.

A snap meeting between council chiefs and workers was held yesterday morning.

Australian Services Union regional organiser Mark Brady said the suspicious sheeting was placed in a concrete crusher, leading to concerns over the potential spread of asbestos particles.

“This is going to be a massive cost to the council one way or another,” Mr Brady said.

“What we understand is the sheeting was identified as potentially asbestos on Tuesday, yet it’s only when we get to Thursday when there’s some strong reaction to the problem.

“The concrete crusher reduces material to powder, which is the state at which asbestos is at its most dangerous. If that’s got onto people’s skin, onto clothing and picked up by the wind, that is a real concern.”

Dust-supressing sprinklers were turned on and other precautions taken as safety officials travelled from Geelong yesterday to contain the site and assess if the crushed material was asbestos.

Text messages were sent to Strong Street depot workers on Thursday evening informing them not to go to work yesterday.

The city council confirmed that a small amount of asbestos-like sheeting was found on Tuesday and was bagged and sealed following expert advice.

The sheeting was found with used road-making materials which were being prepared for recycling.

On Wednesday another quantity of sheeting was discovered near stockpiled road materials, which led council officials to close the depot while testing of the material took place.

City council chief executive Bruce Anson said an independent expert was undertaking an extensive audit of the depot yesterday.

“The initial assessment across our entire depot and around its boundaries has shown there is no asbestos contamination beyond the few pieces found that have since been sealed and removed,” Mr Anson said in a statement. “The closure of the depot is a precautionary measure while we determine whether there is a serious problem and, if there is, the extent of it.”

Mr Anson said WorkSafe had been notified and the city council was following recommended procedures.

“The material thought to contain asbestos was hosed down to ensure it was contained,” he said. “We’re keeping our depot staff — who informed us of the suspect material — apprised of the situation.”

Mr Brady said the workers operating the crusher had not been trained to handle asbestos, adding that the incident highlighted the need for greater checks and balances.

“We’re all too aware of the horrors of asbestos from the news over the years,” the ASU official said.

“We need to ensure our work sites are safe and one of the ways to do that is to provide proper training.”

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Warrnambool council depot closes after asbestos scare

Possible asbestos exposure investigated at Huntington Beach schools

Officials have pledged to test all school classrooms in Huntington Beach for asbestos after concerns were raised that construction work may have exposed students on three campuses to the dangerous material.

Two Huntington Beach elementary school campuses remained closed Tuesday for the testing, which officials said they plan to carry out at all 11 schools, mostly on the weekends.

The Ocean View School District has been investigating whether contractors continued to remove asbestos from facilities after the school year began in September, possibly putting students at three elementary school campuses — Hope View, Oak View and Lake View — in contact with dust.

Parents were notified last week that testing would take place over the weekend and that classes would be canceled Monday and Tuesday, the Huntington Beach Independent reported.

Asbestos is a mineral fiber that until the 1970s was used in building products and insulation materials. Inhaling high levels of asbestos fibers — which can be released into the air during construction — can increase the risk of lung disease, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Parents became aware of the asbestos issue last month when district trustee John Briscoe filed a complaint with the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health after learning the material was being removed from several district schools during a modernization effort that began in July.

Cal/OSHA began its own investigation last week, officials said.

“In our abundance of caution, we have decided to temporarily close as we wait for the additional test results to be completed and that they have confirmed that no asbestos is present and that there is no risk,” Hope View Principal Carrie Haskin wrote in a letter to parents.

No other schools are scheduled to be closed for testing.

Though the district maintains that the schools are safe for students, more than 100 people, mostly parents and teachers, attended a community meeting last week to voice their concerns.

“I have been assured by the hired professional architects, contractors, abatement contractors, construction management and environmental testing companies that the schools are safe,” Supt. Gustavo Balderas wrote in a letter to the community. “I have been provided closure reports showing no airborne asbestos after [it] was abated.”

The district is set to host a special board meeting at 7:05 p.m. Tuesday at the Marine View Middle School gym, 5682 Tilburg Drive, to discuss the school closures.

Hannah Fry writes for Times Community News.

Hannah Fry can be reached at hannah.fry@latimes.com or on Twitter: @HannahFryTCN

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times

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Possible asbestos exposure investigated at Huntington Beach schools

Asbestos testing closes 2 Ocean View schools through Tuesday

Asbestos testing closes 2 Ocean View schools through Tuesday

Two Ocean View School District elementary campuses will be closed through Tuesday while the district conducts tests to determine whether there is evidence of potentially dangerous asbestos inside the Huntington Beach classrooms.

The district’s asbestos reports from the past several years show there is debris in the ceiling tiles at Oak View and Hope View elementary schools. With that in mind, and after complaints from parents about how asbestos has been handled during a construction project, the district decided to temporarily close the schools for further testing, officials said.

Parents were notified last week that testing would take place over the weekend and classes would be canceled Monday and Tuesday.

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  • Huntington Beach, CA, United States

  • “In our abundance of caution, we have decided to temporarily close as we wait for the additional test results to be completed and that they have confirmed that no asbestos is present and that there is no risk,” Hope View Principal Carrie Haskin wrote in a letter to parents.

    “We want to assure parents once reports come back that things are safe and their kids are returning to a healthy environment,” said district Assistant Supt. Roni Ellis.

    The district will continue to conduct testing on weekends until all classrooms at all 11 schools have been reviewed, Supt. Gustavo Balderas wrote in a letter to the community. No other schools are scheduled to be closed for testing.

    Parents became aware of the asbestos issue last month when district Trustee John Briscoe filed a complaint with the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health after learning the material was being removed from several district schools during a modernization effort that began in July.

    Asbestos is a mineral fiber that until the 1970s was used in building products and insulation materials. Asbestos fibers from such materials can be released into the air during demolition work, repairs or remodeling. Inhaling high levels of asbestos can increase the risk of lung disease, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

    Though the district maintains that the schools are safe for students, more than 100 people, mostly parents and teachers, attended a community meeting last week to voice their concerns.

    “I have been assured by the hired professional architects, contractors, abatement contractors, construction management and environmental testing companies that the schools are safe,” Balderas wrote. “I have been provided closure reports showing no airborne asbestos after [it] was abated.”

    Still, the district is investigating whether contractors continued to remove asbestos after the school year began in September, possibly putting students at three elementary campuses — Hope View, Oak View and Lake View — in contact with the dust. Cal/OSHA began its own investigation last week, officials said.

    The district will host a special board meeting at 7:05 p.m. Tuesday at the Marine View Middle School gym, 5682 Tilburg Drive, to discuss the school closures.

    This article is from:

    Asbestos testing closes 2 Ocean View schools through Tuesday

    Lords' asbestos roof to be replaced

    Subiaco council votes to replace Lords’ asbestos roof

    WA News

    Date

    Leanne Nicholson

    Roof to be replaced on Lords recreation centre

    Roof to be replaced on Lords recreation centre

    Subiaco council has voted to replace the entire roof of Lords recreation centre after disturbed asbestos forced the immediate closure of the complex.

    The council voted unanimously on Tuesday night to fund the immediate removal and replacement of the asbestos roof four days after the centre was closed for testing when the deadly fibres were disturbed during renovation works.

    Test results for airborne asbestos are expected to be released later this week.

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    Lords' asbestos roof to be replaced

    Asbestos support group

    Asbestos support group

    Daily Echo: Asbestos support group

    Asbestos support group

    Hampshire Asbestos Support Group (HASG) holds its next meeting on Thursday, February 14, in St Mark’s Church, Archers Road, Southampton. It is open to anyone with asbestos-related illnesses or their families, carers and friends.

    See hasag.co.uk or call 023 8001 0015.

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    Asbestos support group

    Elmwood Park's Sealed Air pays $930 million in cash to asbestos trust

    Sealed Air Corp., the Elmwood Park maker of Bubble Wrap, has paid $930 million in cash into a trust for asbestos victims, the company said Tuesday. The payment settles a claim that arose after Sealed Air bought a business from W.R. Grace & Co., which filed for bankruptcy after facing millions of dollars in asbestos claims.

    W.R. Grace emerged from bankruptcy Monday, after almost 13 years, which cleared the way for Sealed Air to pay the settlement.

    “This is very positive news for Sealed Air, as the completion of the settlement has been anticipated for some time and now brings finality to a matter after more than a decade of preparation,” said Jerome A. Peribere, CEO of Sealed Air. “We will no longer incur interest on the settlement, which amounted to $48 million in 2013. Additionally, we anticipate meaningful cash tax benefits over the next several years.”

    In addition to the $930 million in cash, the company also paid 18 million shares of Sealed Air common stock, with a value of more than $540 million, based on Tuesday’s share value.

    The claims against Sealed Air grew out of its $4.3 billion purchase of Cryovac, a flexible packaging business, from W.R. Grace in 1998. Some plaintiffs accused W.R. Grace of fraudulently transferring assets to Sealed Air “to the detriment of creditors holding asbestos claims against Grace.”

    Sealed Air agreed in 2002 to pay $512 million to settle the claims, but that agreement was held up by litigation over the W.R. Grace bankruptcy, which dragged on for almost 13 years, in what is believed to be the longest bankruptcy in U.S. history.

    Sealed Air’s payment grew to $930 million because of interest. The total value of the W.R. Grace-related asbestos trusts, which will be used to pay people injured by asbestos, is almost $4 billion.

    In a research note, analysts Ghansham Panjabi and Mehul Dalia of R.W. Baird said the resolution of the W.R. Grace agreement is worth about $2 a share to Sealed Air, because Sealed Air will no longer face interest costs on the settlement, and it will be able to take a tax deduction for the settlement amount.

    The analysts called the event “a modest positive” for Sealed Air shares.

    W.R. Grace, a Columbia, Md.-based chemical and materials manufacturer that was founded in 1854, was hit hard by asbestos injury litigation.

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    Elmwood Park's Sealed Air pays $930 million in cash to asbestos trust

    Uxbridge Middle School to be closed a second day for asbestos cleanup

    UXBRIDGE — McCloskey Middle School will be closed for a second day Wednesday as a ceiling-to-floor cleaning is completed by a licensed asbestos abatement contractor. School officials said results from air-quality tests Monday were acceptable, however.

    School officials sent parents an email and phone message Monday night saying the middle school, which houses Grades 6, 7 and 8, would be closed Tuesday after environmental tests showed that flooring material removed over the summer contained asbestos.

    Superintendent of Schools Kevin M. Carney said in an interview that he learned at 3:45 p.m. Monday that asbestos was present in tiles that had been found last week in a Dumpster behind the school. The tiles came from work to replace carpets in three classrooms over the summer.

    He said he was surprised that tiles were underneath the carpets, since most carpets in the district lay on top of concrete or wood.

    Mr. Carney sent parents a second email Tuesday afternoon informing them that the pre-cleaning air-quality tests done Monday night were favorable, meaning that exposure to airborne asbestos particles was below the exposure limits set by the state Department of Environmental Protection.

    “That’s a great, great sign,” Mr. Carney said.

    He said in the email that the decision to keep the school closed a second day, while the building was being thoroughly cleaned, was made to ensure the safety of students and staff and to adhere to regulations set by the Department of Labor Standards and the Department of Environmental Protection.

    Second and final test results were expected by the end of Wednesday.

    Asbestos includes fibrous minerals that have been used for insulation and fireproofing, wallboard, flooring, brakes, textiles and other commercial products. Tiny amounts of asbestos are generally present in the air. But if asbestos-containing material is handled and microscopic fiber particles separate, they can be inhaled.

    According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, long-term exposure to asbestos may increase the risk of lung disorders, including cancer. The risk is particularly increased for smokers or people with pre-existing lung disease.

    In 1999, the Virginia A. Blanchard School in North Uxbridge, which had been an early childhood education center, was closed because of extensive asbestos, among other building problems.

    The McCloskey Middle School, built in 1937, served as Uxbridge High School until the new high school was built off Quaker Highway and opened in 2012.

    “We’re not sure how they didn’t pick up the presence of asbestos previously,” said one parent of a sixth-grade student, who asked that her name not be printed to protect her daughter. “The presence of asbestos is alarming.”

    “There’s asbestos material in any old building,” Mr. Carney said. “It’s how well it’s contained. We will proceed cautiously for sure.”

    Mr. Carney said once the immediate situation is dealt with, he wanted to find out when the building workers knew there were tiles under the carpet and whether they took the necessary precautions.

    “We’re so thankful for the patience of people,” Mr. Carney said. “I know it’s disruptive.”

    Read the article: 

    Uxbridge Middle School to be closed a second day for asbestos cleanup

    Asbestos school HSE probe call

    Uses of Asbestos

    Cwmcarn High SchoolMore than 900 pupils have missed classes since the school was closed on Friday

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    A teaching union says it has asked the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) to investigate the discovery of asbestos at a south Wales secondary school.

    The 900-pupil Cwmcarn High School was shut late on Friday after a structural report identified the material.

    Geraint Davies of NASUWT Cymru said he wanted the HSE to confirm that correct procedures are adhered to.

    The HSE said it was looking to whether there are grounds for a full investigation.

    Meanwhile, Welsh Liberal Democrat leader Kirsty Williams has called for a national audit of asbestos in schools in Wales.


    Start Quote

    When a school of 900 pupils has had to close because asbestos was found in airborne particles, I think that people across Wales have a right to know if asbestos is a danger in their local school”

    End QuoteKirsty Williams AMWelsh Liberal Democrat leader

    Caerphilly council has said public health officials would report on the situation at the school on Tuesday.

    The announcement that the school was to close with immediate effect came on Friday afternoon.

    The council said the action had been taken to safeguard the health and wellbeing of pupils and staff.

    Mr Davies told BBC Wales on Tuesday: “In simple terms this is a health and safety matter and the Health And Safety Executive provides independent advice on such matters.

    “In view of the seriousness of what has happened at Cwmcarn it’s only fair to all concerned, be it teachers and anciliary staff, parents and pupils and indeed the council itself, for such independent advice to be available.”

    An HSE spokesman confirmed: “We are looking into the issue of asbestos at the school. We have to see whether there are grounds for a full investigation.”

    NASUWT spokesman Rex Phillips had earlier raised safety concerns, saying high levels of the material had been found throughout the building.

    He said staff and pupils at the school could have been exposed to airborne asbestos.

    Mr Phillips said the problem was found when a company visited the school to carry out a survey on a boiler room.

    ‘Hidden killer’

    He said the asbestos was found to be in airborne particles, with two-thirds of the school “inoperable”.

    “They have taken the action to close the building because of that and they have virtually got a sealed building at the school,” he added.


    Start Quote

    Natalie Stock

    Everybody knew about it but I’m glad they are getting rid of it.”

    End QuoteNatalie StockParent

    In the wake of the closure Ms Williams called on the Welsh government to conduct a national audit of asbestos in schools.

    “Asbestos is a hidden killer and I am very concerned that pupils, staff and teachers at our schools could be unknowingly exposed to asbestos,” she said.

    “I do not want to cause undue alarm, however when a school of 900 pupils has had to close because asbestos was found in airborne particles, I think that people across Wales have a right to know if asbestos is a danger in their local school.”

    The Welsh government has been asked for comment.

    Caerphilly council said the latest updates would be announced on its website.

    It added that it was working with the school’s senior leadership team and governors to explore alternative arrangements for pupils and staff, but this was unlikely to be resolved this week.

    The authority said every effort was being made to accommodate pupils in years 11, 12 and 13 as a priority.

    It is reported that pupils at the school have been given work to do at home via social networking sites.

    Parents with pupils at the school reacted to the closure in Cwmcarn on Tuesday.

    Natalie Stock, whose 12-year-old son Jake is in Year 8 said: “The closure of the school was a shock. I don’t think they’ve handled it too well.”

    With regard to the presence of asbestos at the school she said: “Everybody knew about it but I’m glad they are getting rid of it.”

    Her sister Jolene White, 33, whose 12-year-old daughter Olivia is a a year 7 pupil, said: “It’s a bit of an inconvenience.

    “She thinks it’s brilliant having extra time off school.

    “Obviously their safety has to come first. I would rather they didn’t have to close it down so they could sort it out.

    “I don’t like the ideas of the school being closed permanently.”

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    Asbestos school HSE probe call