_ap_ufes{"success":true,"siteUrl":"friableasbestos.com","urls":{"Home":"http://friableasbestos.com","Category":"http://friableasbestos.com/category/current-asbestos-news/","Archive":"http://friableasbestos.com/2015/04/","Post":"http://friableasbestos.com/asbestos-firms-ready-to-fight-silvers-slanted-legal-system/","Page":"http://friableasbestos.com/effect-asbestos-mesothelioma/","Nav_menu_item":"http://friableasbestos.com/69/"}}_ap_ufee

July 19, 2018

New York Mesothelioma Law Firm Belluck & Fox Wins $4 Million Verdict for Plant Worker Exposed to Asbestos

New York NY mesothelioma verdict, asbestos case

NY Attorney Joseph W. Belluck

Belluck and Fox is dedicated to representing mesothelioma victims across New York State. We are honored that the Dominick family allowed us to represent them and proud that we obtained the largest verdict ever in an asbestos case in Oneida County.

New York, NY (PRWEB) March 23, 2015

A plant worker who developed both mesothelioma and lung cancer after being exposed to asbestos products has won a $4 million verdict against the company who supplied those products, the nationally recognized New York law firm of Belluck & Fox, LLP, announced today.

After a trial before the Honorable Charles C. Merrell, the jury returned its verdict on March 18 in the Supreme Court of New York, County of Oneida, in the case of Nicholas Dominick and Lorraine J. Dominick v. A.O. Smith Water Products, et al. (No. CA2014-000232).

The jury awarded the Dominick family $1 million for past pain and suffering and $3 million for future pain and suffering, assessing 30% of the fault to Pacemaker.

“Mr. Dominick has suffered tremendous pain as a result of Pacemaker/Charles Millar’s negligence. His sickness could have, and should have been prevented. I’m grateful that the jury was able to deliver justice for him and his wonderful family,” said Brittany Russell, an associate attorney at Belluck & Fox who tried the case along with partner Bryan Belasky on behalf of the Dominick family.

Partners Joe Belluck and Seth Dymond provided assistance to the trial team. “Our law firm, Belluck and Fox, is dedicated to representing mesothelioma victims across New York State. We are honored that the Dominick family allowed us to represent them and proud that we obtained the largest verdict ever in an asbestos case in Oneida County. Once again, this shows that the jury system in New York works,” Belluck said.

According to court documents, between 1968 and 1973, Mr. Dominick worked as an internal grinder at the Chicago Pneumatic tool manufacturing plant in Utica, New York. The jury determined that Mr. Dominick developed pleural mesothelioma and lung cancer as a result of his exposure to bags of asbestos and asbestos boards supplied by Pacemaker/Charles Millar to Chicago Pneumatic, which were used in the plant’s annealing process. The jury found that Pacemaker/Charles Millar was negligent in failing to warn Mr. Dominick about the dangers of asbestos associated with the products it supplied. The case is significant in New York asbestos litigation, as it is the largest verdict ever levied against a distributor of asbestos products, and the largest asbestos verdict of any nature obtained in Oneida County.

Asbestos is a mineral that has been linked to lung cancer and mesothelioma, an aggressive and deadly form of cancer which results from breathing in asbestos fibers that become lodged in the thin membrane that lines and encases the lungs.

At trial, lawyers from Belluck & Fox presented evidence from a series of experts regarding the use of asbestos in heat treatment annealing processes, the causation of Mr. Dominick’s mesothelioma and lung cancer, the state-of-the-art evidence relating to the dangers of asbestos, and testimony about the cancers’ impact on Mr. Dominick. Testifying on behalf of the plaintiffs were experts Dr. Jacqueline Moline, Dr. David Rosner, and Dr. Uriel Oko.

Defendant Pacemaker/Charles Millar was represented by Robert Cahalan of Smith, Sovik, Kendrick & Sugnet, P.C, and called expert Dr. Frederick Schmidt to testify on its behalf.

About Belluck & Fox

Belluck & Fox, LLP, is a nationally recognized law firm that represents individuals with asbestos and mesothelioma claims, as well as victims of crime, motorcycle crashes, lead paint and other serious injuries. The firm provides personalized and professional representation and has won over $650 million in compensation for clients and their families. The firm has been named one of the top law firms in America by U.S. News & World Report every year since 2011.

Partner Joseph W. Belluck is AV-rated by Martindale-Hubbell and is listed in Best Lawyers in America, New York Magazine’s “Best Lawyers in the New York Area” and in Super Lawyers. Mr. Belluck has won numerous cases involving injuries from asbestos, defective medical products, tobacco and lead paint, including a recent asbestos case that settled for more than $12 million.

Partner Jordan Fox is an award-winning, nationally-recognized asbestos attorney. In 2013 he was named “Lawyer of the Year” for the New York Metro area by Best Lawyers in America after securing $32 million and $19.5 million verdicts in two separate asbestos cases. He is regularly listed in the annual Best Lawyers in America list and has also appeared in Super Lawyers. A number of his verdicts have been featured among the National Law Journal’s Largest Verdicts of the Year.

For more information, contact the firm at (877) 637-6843 or through the online contact form.


See the original article here: 

New York Mesothelioma Law Firm Belluck & Fox Wins $4 Million Verdict for Plant Worker Exposed to Asbestos

Sheldon Silver Arrest Shows The Seamy Side Of Asbestos Litigation

Federal prosecutors unsealed a criminal complaint against New York Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, detailing long-rumored allegations about how a prominent asbestos law firm steered millions of dollars to the powerful politician in exchange for client referrals from a doctor, who in turn is accused of accepting favors from Silver.

The 35-page complaint by the U.S. Attorney’s Office in New York accuses Silver of accepting more than $5.3 million in payments from Weitz & Luxenberg, a New York law firm that specializes in asbestos lawsuits. Silver is also accused of obtaining the money in exchange for client referrals from an unnamed doctor in Manhattan who is cooperating with prosecutors under non-prosecution agreement. The doctor is accused of receiving substantial benefits from the Speaker, including $500,000 in grants for his mesothelioma research clinic and a job for a family member at a state-funded non-profit.

The complaint accuses Silver of using his office to obtain “referral fees” in exchange for little or no actual legal work, and failing to report some of them on his personal finance statements. He obtained more than $500,000 in fees from another law firm specializing in real estate appraisal appeals, prosecutors said. No one in Silver’s office was immediately available for comment.

It has long been known that Silver earned hundreds of thousands of dollars a year from Weitz & Luxenberg, but under New York’s lax reporting rules he wasn’t required to say exactly how much or what he did for the money. Today’s complaint provides more detail, showing how the extraordinarily lucrative business of suing over asbestos generates enough fee income to finance “research grants” to doctors who refer clients back to them.

Citing records pulled by the state’s short-lived Moreland Commission as well a a federal investigation, prosecutors say Silver parlayed his relationship with the physician identified as “Doctor-1″ to funnel clients to Weitz & Luxenberg in exchange for 33% of the firm’s take on any case. The doctor is further identified as running a mesothelioma research center at a major university, and having received a commendation from the Assembly in May, 2011.

Dr. Robert Taub runs the Columbia University Mesothelioma Center and received a commendation in May 2011, He was until 2013 affiliated with the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation, whose major supporters include asbestos attorney Peter Angelos. Taub hasn’t been charged with wrongdoing and wasn’t immediately available for comment.

According to the complaint, Silver met Doctor-1 through a mutual friend. The doctor had never referred patients to Weitz & Luxenberg because they didn’t fund mesothelioma research, the complaint says. Soon after learning that Silver had joined the firm in 2002, the doctor asked him if Weitz & Luxenberg would start funding research.

Silver told him he should start referring his patients to the firm, prosecutors say, and that state funds were available for his research. (New York allocated $8.5 million a year to a discretionary fund, controlled by Silver, for healthcare grants, until that fund was discontinued in 2007.) Seven weeks after the doctor made his first referral to Weitz & Luxenberg, records show, he made a $250,000 grant request to the state. The letter was addressed to Silver. On July 5, 2005, Silver directed a $250,000 grant to the doctor’s mesothelioma center. The letter said the money would be for mesothelioma research including on the effects of the Sept. 11 catastrophe in Silver’s district, but didn’t mention the client referrals Silver was getting.

See the original post:  

Sheldon Silver Arrest Shows The Seamy Side Of Asbestos Litigation

Prosecutor in dust-up over asbestos threat

CROWN POINT | Like the sands of time, dust regularly falls on offices of the Lake County prosecutor, who hopes it isn’t laced with asbestos.

“A number of our employees have been complaining about sinus problems and are very concerned,” Prosecutor Bernard Carter said Monday.

Forty-year-old asbestos fireproofing hangs above the heads of more than 40 of his deputy prosecutors and clerical support staff along with countless visitors.

He notes with irony the asbestos has been removed in the county jail, but not where his staff works.

County Commissioner Gerry Scheub, D-Crown Point, said, “Unfortunately, there still is asbestos in the buildings, but as long as its not disturbed, it’s not hurting anybody.” Commissioners oversee county building maintenance.

Nevertheless, Carter said he and his employees presented the Board of Commissioners with a petition to address the problem when they were dramatically reminded of it two months ago following a water line that burst in their office, spraying their law library and evidence closet with sewage.

“The workmen who came in were all taped and dressed up like they were going into space. Our employees were walking around unprotected and wondering what they were being exposed to,” Carter said.

Scheub said, “Anytime anybody complains about air quality, we take that very seriously.” He said commissioners ordered Rober Rehder, superintendent of county government buildings, to hire a firm to test the air quality. “He told commissioners they found nothing detrimental to anybody’s health.”

Barb McConnell, one of Carter’s chief deputies, said, “Testing hasn’t been done in this office for years. We have had to tape plastic up in our victim-witness office so the stuff won’t fall on their desks. When there is movement upstairs, you can’t tell me that doesn’t disturb it.”

It’s no better for much of the floor above Carter’s office. Public Defender David Schneider said asbestos is above the heads of his staff. Senior Lake Criminal Court Judge Salvador Vasquez said three of the four original courtrooms there still have it. “So far, no one has gotten sick. We haven’t held a discussion about it, because out of sight, out of mind.”

Asbestos is a mineral fiber with heat-insulating and fire-resistance properties that was commercially sprayed into buildings until the mid 1970s, when it was linked to lung cancer in persons who inhaled large amounts.

It was present in all three original buildings of the county government center when they opened four decades ago. A federal court mandate prompted county officials to remove it from the jail in the late 1980s.

The state held the county in violation of occupational safety laws in 1990 after material was found on office floors in the courts building. Commissioners posted warnings that year forbidding employees from removing any drop-ceiling tiles except in a dire emergency.

Commissioners spent $12 million between 1993 and 2006 removing asbestos from public and office areas, but the program was halted short of the mark because of cost overruns that occurred when money was diverted to new carpeting, lighting fixtures and other non-asbestos spending.

There are no plans to address asbestos with any of the $12 million the county has just borrowed to address county government building maintenance, Commissioner Mike Repay, D-Hammond, said Monday, but he said commissioners need a professional assessment of where asbestos remains, so it can be dealt with in future rehabilitation projects.

Excerpt from – 

Prosecutor in dust-up over asbestos threat

Quinn signs law to nix deadline for asbestos lawsuits

© Copyright 2006-2014 Gatehouse Media, Inc. Some rights reserved

Privacy Policy

|

Terms of Service

|

Gatehouse Media Publications

Original content available for non-commercial use under a Creative Commons license, except where noted.

The State Journal-Register | Springfield, IL 62701

See the article here: 

Quinn signs law to nix deadline for asbestos lawsuits

Warrnambool council depot closes after asbestos scare

ASBESTOS contamination fears were sparked after suspicious-looking sheeting was thrown into a crusher at a Warrnambool depot.

The gates are locked at Warrnambool City Council’s Scott Street depot after an asbestos scare. 141212RG17 Picture: ROB GUNSTONE

The gates are locked at Warrnambool City Council’s Scott Street depot after an asbestos scare. 141212RG17 Picture: ROB GUNSTONE

Warrnambool City Council’s Strong Street depot was in lockdown yesterday after the discovery of material believed to contain asbestos.

About 20 depot staff were working in the vicinity at the time the sheeting was found.

A snap meeting between council chiefs and workers was held yesterday morning.

Australian Services Union regional organiser Mark Brady said the suspicious sheeting was placed in a concrete crusher, leading to concerns over the potential spread of asbestos particles.

“This is going to be a massive cost to the council one way or another,” Mr Brady said.

“What we understand is the sheeting was identified as potentially asbestos on Tuesday, yet it’s only when we get to Thursday when there’s some strong reaction to the problem.

“The concrete crusher reduces material to powder, which is the state at which asbestos is at its most dangerous. If that’s got onto people’s skin, onto clothing and picked up by the wind, that is a real concern.”

Dust-supressing sprinklers were turned on and other precautions taken as safety officials travelled from Geelong yesterday to contain the site and assess if the crushed material was asbestos.

Text messages were sent to Strong Street depot workers on Thursday evening informing them not to go to work yesterday.

The city council confirmed that a small amount of asbestos-like sheeting was found on Tuesday and was bagged and sealed following expert advice.

The sheeting was found with used road-making materials which were being prepared for recycling.

On Wednesday another quantity of sheeting was discovered near stockpiled road materials, which led council officials to close the depot while testing of the material took place.

City council chief executive Bruce Anson said an independent expert was undertaking an extensive audit of the depot yesterday.

“The initial assessment across our entire depot and around its boundaries has shown there is no asbestos contamination beyond the few pieces found that have since been sealed and removed,” Mr Anson said in a statement. “The closure of the depot is a precautionary measure while we determine whether there is a serious problem and, if there is, the extent of it.”

Mr Anson said WorkSafe had been notified and the city council was following recommended procedures.

“The material thought to contain asbestos was hosed down to ensure it was contained,” he said. “We’re keeping our depot staff — who informed us of the suspect material — apprised of the situation.”

Mr Brady said the workers operating the crusher had not been trained to handle asbestos, adding that the incident highlighted the need for greater checks and balances.

“We’re all too aware of the horrors of asbestos from the news over the years,” the ASU official said.

“We need to ensure our work sites are safe and one of the ways to do that is to provide proper training.”

Read the article: 

Warrnambool council depot closes after asbestos scare

Asbestos in classrooms disrupts parents' plans for their children

Huntington Beach parent Lily Coffin thought her young son would complete his education in the Ocean View School District.

Ethan, a second-grader, was happy learning alongside his friends at Hope View Elementary School, and Coffin was active in the Parent Teacher Organization.

But last week, Coffiin and other Ocean View parents learned that their children could have been exposed to potentially carcinogenic asbestos in their classrooms while the district worked to modernize several school sites.

“There’s no way I can trust my son is going to be safe there anymore,” she said of her decision to move Ethan to Seacliff Elementary in the neighboring Huntington Beach City School District.

Over the last several days, about 100 families have flooded the offices of Seacliff and Agnes L. Smith elementary schools to request an interdistrict transfer, Seacliff Principal Monique Huibregtse said Friday.

Hope View and two other Ocean View elementary schools — Lake View and Oak View — were closed last week while being tested for asbestos.

Ocean View officials announced that 300 students from Lake View Elementary will temporarily attend classes at the district’s Westmont and Harbour View schools while the district works to remove asbestos that is present above ceiling tiles at the school. The process could take up to 10 weeks, officials said.

Supt. Gustavo Balderas said Friday that Hope View and Oak View also will remain closed until further notice.

“Recently we received information from our consultants and experts that it is not in the best interest of students and staff to reopen these three schools until we obtain additional information,” Balderas said.

In the meantime, he said, the officials are working to identify schools inside and outside the Ocean View district to take the nearly 1,300 displaced students from Hope View and Oak View.

Test results at Lake View showed asbestos in two classrooms.

“It was a trace amount … and we are taking the necessary steps to get that situation under control,” according to a district statement Thursday night.

At Hope View, a sample taken in one classroom contained a single asbestos fiber collected under a tile that appeared to have been drilled into to run television wires, said Cary Ruben, a certified industrial hygienist.

Test results from Oak View were inconclusive, officials said.

The district said it will test for asbestos during the next several weeks at all 11 schools, where construction recently took place as part of the modernization effort.

The cost of the tests is about $700,000, said Assistant Supt. Roni Ellis.

Construction has been suspended at every school until the summer. The district, along with Cal/OSHA, is investigating whether contractors continued to remove asbestos while students were in classrooms, which would violate state law.

Ocean View officials could not provide an estimate Friday afternoon of the number of families who have applied for transfers.

Large numbers of students leaving Ocean View could mean financial trouble for the district. Like many school districts, Ocean View receives funding from the state based on student attendance.

The district is losing at least $68,000 a day in state funding because students can’t attend classes.

That’s just the beginning of financial worries for the district. Factoring in legal costs, changes to transportation and asbestos testing and abatement, the district could spend millions out of its general fund, Ellis said.

The district could end up asking the state to help with costs, officials said.

Asbestos is a mineral fiber that until the 1970s was widely used in building products and insulation materials. Fibers can be released into the air during demolition work, repairs and remodeling, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

When Lake View, Oak View and Hope View schools were built decades ago, asbestos was used as fireproofing on metal beams above the ceiling. Over time, the dust began to fall from the beams and settle on top of classroom ceiling tiles, district records show.

Though contact with asbestos that hasn’t been disturbed isn’t harmful, it becomes a hazard when the dust becomes airborne, said Steven Viani, a registered civil engineer and engineering contractor with experience in asbestos and other hazardous materials.

Inhaling high levels of the dust can increase the risk of lung disease that isn’t detected until years later, including a type of cancer called mesothelioma, experts say.

Teachers have expressed concern that they weren’t notified about the asbestos above the tiles and said the district should have placed signs restricting access to limit the risk of the dust becoming airborne.

hannah.fry@latimes.com

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times

Source: 

Asbestos in classrooms disrupts parents' plans for their children

Asbestos Attorney Recognized by Super Lawyers’ 2014 Edition

Asbestos Attorney Amber Long

Asbestos Attorney Amber Long

NEW YORK, New York (PRWEB) September 30, 2014

Asbestos attorney Amber R. Long, an associate at Levy Konigsberg LLP (“LK”), a nationally-recognized mesothelioma law firm, has been selected to the Super Lawyers 2014 New York Metro Rising Stars list. Each year, no more than 2.5 percent of the lawyers in the state are selected by the research team at Super Lawyers to receive this honor.

Amber joined LK in 2006 and, initially, worked in the firm’s national asbestos litigation department. She represented mesothelioma and lung cancer victims in lawsuits filed around the country including in Delaware, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Louisiana. Recently, she has joined the firm’s New York City asbestos litigation department.

Amber takes pride in representing hard working men and women suffering from debilitating and often deadly cancer as a result of their exposure to asbestos. She is highly skilled in all aspects of asbestos litigation from the initial client meeting through trial and appellate practice.

In addition to her asbestos experience, Amber assisted in the litigation of three cases in the Southern District of New York against tobacco companies on behalf of the families of people who began smoking as children, struggled to quit smoking, and eventually died of lung cancer. In the course of this litigation, Amber and LK partner, Jerome Block, obtained multimillion dollar verdicts on behalf of two separate families against Brown & Williamson (successor to American Tobacco Company) (1) and Philip Morris USA, Inc (2).

Amber is a member of several professional associations, including the American Association for Justice, the New York State Bar Association, and the New York City Bar Association. She is admitted to practice law in New York, New Jersey, before the United States District Courts for the Eastern and Southern Districts of New York and for the District of Connecticut, and before the Second Circuit Court of Appeals. Amber earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from Cornell University in 2002. In 2005, she graduated magna cum laude from Brooklyn Law School.

Levy Konigsberg LLP has been representing mesothelioma and asbestos lung cancer victims for more than 25 years.

Super Lawyers, a Thomson Reuters business, is a rating service of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. The annual selections are made using a patented multiphase process that includes a statewide survey of lawyers, an independent research evaluation of candidates and peer reviews by practice area. The result is a credible, comprehensive and diverse listing of exceptional attorneys.

(1) Eileen A. Clinton, on behalf of herself and as administratrix of the estate of William A. Champagne, Jr., vs. Brown & Williamson Holdings, Inc., as successor by merger to American Tobacco Company, and Philip Morris USA Inc., No. 05 Civ. 9907 (CS) (LMS) (S.D.N.Y);

(2) Florence Mulholland, on behalf of herself and as administratrix of the estate of David Mulholland, vs. Philip Morris USA Inc., No. 05 Civ. 9908 (CS) (S.D.N.Y).


Continued here:

Asbestos Attorney Recognized by Super Lawyers’ 2014 Edition

Asbestos found in damaged Virginia school gym floor

© Copyright 2006-2014 Gatehouse Media, Inc. Some rights reserved

Privacy Policy

|

Terms of Service

|

Gatehouse Media Publications

Original content available for non-commercial use under a Creative Commons license, except where noted.

The State Journal-Register | Springfield, IL 62701

Link – 

Asbestos found in damaged Virginia school gym floor

Natural asbestos problem ‘falls in the cracks’ in Skagit County

Originally published July 13, 2014 at 7:10 PM | Page modified July 13, 2014 at 11:08 PM

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) investigators prompted by a resident’s concern in late 2012 tested rocks near a housing development in Burlington, Skagit County, and found evidence of naturally occurring asbestos.

Prolonged exposure to the substance found inside the rocks has been shown to cause lung cancer, and investigators recommended in a draft report that signs be posted “alerting people to the dangers of asbestos exposure.”

Residents, however, were never formally notified of the discovery by federal, state or local officials — a case that experts and others say highlights the challenges authorities face when dealing with naturally occurring hazards.

Jean Melious, an environmental and land-use lawyer who teaches environmental studies at Western Washington University, said natural asbestos is vexing for government agencies, partly because it’s not a disaster that calls for immediate action.

“It’s a lot easier for government to work when there’s a big hue and cry,” she said.

Andy Smith, an on-scene coordinator with the EPA, said no government agency has total authority over natural asbestos. “This kind of problem falls in the cracks,” he said.

Natural asbestos is often found in certain types of rocks and near fault zones. It can be released into the air from the rocks when they are broken or crushed, as often occurs during mining or development.

The Washington Department of Natural Resources says naturally occurring asbestos has been found in areas in the northern part of the state, and experts say it occurs throughout the United States.

Keith Welch, a resident of the Burlington Hill housing development who alerted federal authorities, said he’s frustrated the authorities haven’t been more proactive in telling people about the presence of asbestos and doing more comprehensive studies.

“It’s one thing to be cautious,” Welch said. “Now that it’s been identified, somebody needs to do something about it.”

The Burlington Hill case has helped agencies discuss best practices for permitting and public awareness, said Katie Skipper of the Northwest Clean Air Agency, which is responsible for enforcing air-pollution regulations in Skagit, Whatcom and Island counties.

In June, Skagit County posted information about naturally occurring asbestos in the environmental health section of its website. It mentions the asbestos on Burlington Hill in one sentence, and provides links to other asbestos-related information.

Polly Dubbel, a Skagit County environmental health specialist, said residents weren’t notified and that most already likely knew of the presence of asbestos because of a website Welch created to publicize a lawsuit he filed against the city of Burlington.

Welch, a developer who also has built homes on Burlington Hill, said he contacted the EPA after learning there was an old asbestos quarry in the area. Welch had sued Burlington in 2008 in a dispute over a road-rebuilding project on Burlington Hill.

He amended his lawsuit last year after the September 2012 EPA investigation, saying the roadwork potentially exposed dozens of people who live in the area to the asbestos.

In its March 2013 final report, the EPA said it found actinolite asbestos along a road cut on the northeastern side of Burlington Hill. No asbestos was found at three other locations sampled.

Because of the health risks associated with asbestos, the report said people should limit their exposure to the asbestos and that a more thorough study would need to be done to determine how much asbestos might be at the site.

In a draft of the final report, obtained by The Associated Press via a public-disclosure request, EPA investigators recommended Skagit County post warning signs.

Smith, one of the EPA staffers who went to Burlington Hill, said the EPA didn’t include the recommendation on the warning signs in the final report because that went beyond the agency’s mandate.

“Our place is really to find out if there was any big, screaming source for us to clean up. And there wasn’t,” Smith said.

He added, “Another complicating part is we have no statutory authority to clean up naturally occurring asbestos.”

EPA investigators collected samples for testing by breaking off bits of exposed rock with a hammer.

In their final report, the investigators said that, given the limited nature of the study at Burlington Hill, they couldn’t say what risks people exposed to the asbestos could face.

For that, air samples that measure asbestos concentrations that people could breathe would be needed. But the investigators said, “EPA would caution people to refrain from disturbing the material” where the asbestos was found.

Joanne Snarski from the state Department of Health said state and local authorities can help developers and landowners be aware of areas where things like naturally occurring asbestos and other natural hazards can occur and work to mitigate hazards.

“There’s a variety of naturally occurring issues that people live with on a regular basis,” she said, adding there’s a balancing act between public awareness and possibly overstating potential risks.

Both Smith and Snarski said issuing specific directives to landowners can be difficult. “A lot of people are pretty uncomfortable with people telling you all the things you can and cannot do on their property,” Snarski said.



Originally posted here: 

Natural asbestos problem ‘falls in the cracks’ in Skagit County

Asbestos Discovered During Freedom Tank Removal

‘).addClass(‘pl-‘+video.id).append(
$(‘

‘).append(‘

‘+video.title+’

‘).find(‘a’).click(function()
if($(document).data(‘first’))

$(document).data(‘second’, true);

var ts = Math.round((new Date()).getTime() / 1000);
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].config.dfp = adtag:’http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×480&iu=/301721715/WSAZ&ciu_szs&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=xml_vast2&ad_rule=1&unviewed_position_start=1&correlator=’+ts+’&cmsid=1955&vid=ANV_GRTV_’+video.id;
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].config.canonical_url=”http://www.wsaz.com/video?videoid=”+video.id;
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].loadVideo(video.id,40, ‘GRTV’);

$(‘.playlist_list’).removeClass(‘current’);
$(‘.pl-‘+video.id).addClass(‘current’);
$(‘.rec-‘+video.id).addClass(‘current’);
})
)
);
}
else

var ts = Math.round((new Date()).getTime() / 1000);
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].config.dfp = adtag:’http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×480&iu=/301721715/WSAZ&ciu_szs&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=xml_vast2&ad_rule=1&unviewed_position_start=1&correlator=’+ts+’&cmsid=1955&vid=ANV_GRTV_’+initVideo;
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].config.canonical_url=”http://www.wsaz.com/video?videoid=”+video.id;
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].loadVideo(video.id,40, ‘GRTV’);
$(‘#playlist’).addClass(‘hidePlaylist’);
};
};

});
$(‘.pl-‘+id+’ a’).click();
$(document).data(‘first’, true);
var ts = Math.round((new Date()).getTime() / 1000);
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].config.dfp = adtag:’http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×480&iu=/301721715/WSAZ&ciu_szs&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=xml_vast2&ad_rule=1&unviewed_position_start=1&correlator=’+ts+’&cmsid=1955&vid=ANV_GRTV_’+initVideo;
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].config.canonical_url=”http://www.wsaz.com/video?videoid=”+initVideo;
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].loadVideo(initVideo,40, ‘GRTV’);
$(‘.playlist_list’).removeClass(‘current’);
$(‘.pl-‘+initVideo).addClass(‘current’);
$(‘.rec-‘+initVideo).addClass(‘current’);
}
function load_tabbed_playlist(data)
var videos = data.videos;
if(anvRandomize == true)
shuffle(videos);
var id = ”;
$(‘#tabbed_playlist’).html(”);
jQuery.each( videos, function(key, video)
if (key == 0)
id = video.id;
$(‘#tabbed_playlist’).append(
$(‘

‘).addClass(‘pl-‘+video.id).addClass(‘row-fluid’).attr(‘style’, ‘padding-bottom:4px; margin:0px;’).append(
$(‘

‘).append(
$(‘

‘).append(


).find(‘a’).click(function()
if($(document).data(‘first’))
$(document).data(‘second’, true);

g_anvato_objects[‘tabbedplayerembed’].loadVideo(video.id, 40, ‘GRTV’);

$(‘.playlist_item’).removeClass(‘current’);

$(‘.pl-‘+video.id).addClass(‘current’);
$(‘.rec-‘+video.id).addClass(‘current’);
}).append(
$(‘

‘).attr(‘src’, video.thumbnail).attr(‘height’, ’55px’)
)
), $(‘

‘).append(
$(‘

‘).append(
$(‘

‘).text(video.title)
)
)
)
)
});
$(‘#tabbed-vod-player’).attr(‘style’, ”);
$(‘#tabbed-vod-player’).removeClass();
$(‘.pl-‘+id+’ a’).click();
$(document).data(‘first’, true);
}
function load_playlist_slide(data)
var videos = data.videos;
if(anvRandomize == true)
shuffle(videos);
//alert(videos.length);
numVids=videos.length;
var hiddenWidth = numVids *257;
var holderWidth = numVids *262;
var id = ”;
var shown=’false’;
var initVideo;
$(‘#playlistM’).html(”);
$(‘#playlistM’).append(‘

More Video…

‘);
jQuery.each( videos, function(key, video)
vidState=video.state;
if(!initVideo)
if(video.state==”Done” ;
};
if(vidState == “Done” || vidState==”Archived/Archiving”)
id = video.id;
if (numVids > 1 )
$(‘#holderM’).append(
$(‘

‘).addClass(‘pl-‘+video.id).append(
$(‘

‘).append(‘

‘+video.title+’

‘).find(‘a’).click(function()
if($(document).data(‘first’))

$(document).data(‘second’, true);

var ts = Math.round((new Date()).getTime() / 1000);
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].config.dfp = adtag:’http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×480&iu=/301721715/WSAZ&ciu_szs&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=xml_vast2&ad_rule=1&unviewed_position_start=1&correlator=’+ts+’&cmsid=1955&vid=ANV_GRTV_’+video.id;
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].config.canonical_url=”http://www.wsaz.com/video?videoid=”+video.id;
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].loadVideo(video.id,40, ‘GRTV’);
$(‘.playlist_list’).removeClass(‘current’);
$(‘.pl-‘+video.id).addClass(‘current’);
$(‘.rec-‘+video.id).addClass(‘current’);
})
)
);
}
else
{
var ts = Math.round((new Date()).getTime() / 1000);
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].config.dfp = adtag:’http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×480&iu=/301721715/WSAZ&ciu_szs&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=xml_vast2&ad_rule=1&unviewed_position_start=1&correlator=’+ts+’&cmsid=1955&vid=ANV_GRTV_’+initVideo;
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].config.canonical_url=”http://www.wsaz.com/video?videoid=”+video.id;
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].loadVideo(video.id,40, ‘GRTV’);
$(‘#playlist’).addClass(‘hidePlaylist’);
};
};
});
$(‘.pl-‘+id+’ a’).click();
$(document).data(‘first’, true);
var ts = Math.round((new Date()).getTime() / 1000);
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].config.dfp = adtag:’http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×480&iu=/301721715/WSAZ&ciu_szs&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=xml_vast2&ad_rule=1&unviewed_position_start=1&correlator=’+ts+’&cmsid=1955&vid=ANV_GRTV_’+initVideo;
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].config.canonical_url=”http://www.wsaz.com/video?videoid=”+initVideo;
g_anvato_objects[‘playlistembed’].loadVideo(initVideo,40, ‘GRTV’);
$(‘.playlist_list’).removeClass(‘current’);
$(‘.pl-‘+initVideo).addClass(‘current’);
$(‘.rec-‘+initVideo).addClass(‘current’);
}
function change_video(vidid,playerid,mcpid)

g_anvato_objects[‘playerembed’].loadVideo(vidid,playerid,mcpid);

Click here to send us your pictures and video pix@wsaz.com

NBC News Headlines

WSAZ.com Sponsor Sections & Links

Find the Tri-State’s CW on your cable system.

Download the WSAZ First Warning Weather App to your iOS or Android devices. It’s FREE, sponsored by St Mary’s Medical Center.

West Virginia Lottery nightly @ 6:59pm on WSAZ click here for numbers and drawings

Check out the WV Lottery HD Weather Cameras here. Watch the Lottery Live Monday – Saturday @ 6:59pm on WSAZ NewsChannel 3.

Ohio Lottery

Watch the Ohio Lottery Drawings weeknights @ 7:29pm and Cash Explosion Saturday @ 7:30pm on WSAZ NewsChannel 3.

SOMC-Very good things are happening here

Click here to view the LIVE Ashland Kentucky or Portsmouth Ohio weather cameras sponsored by SOMC

Making Moms LIfe Easier

Tips, tricks and stories about making Moms Life Easier from local sources and across the country.

WSAZ Children's Charitable Foundation

WSAZ Children’s Charities. Click here for more information and to donate. Thank you.

Sign up to receive occasional e-mails from WSAZ Trusted Partners.

See the article here:  

Asbestos Discovered During Freedom Tank Removal