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February 19, 2018

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization Thanks 2014 Sponsors, Donors, and Volunteers Who Led a Year of Change

LOS ANGELES–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), the largest independent non-profit organization in the U.S. which combines education, advocacy, and community to protect public health and asbestos victims’ civil rights recognizes Sponsors, Donors, and Volunteers who were instrumental in the 2014 ADAO year of impact. As the organization plans for its 2015 conference, leadership takes a moment to specifically call out the names of those who have been so pivotal to this year’s success.

“Sometimes it’s hard to believe we’re coming up on our Eleventh Annual International Asbestos Awareness Conference, Where Knowledge and Action Unite, which will be held April 17-19, 2015 in Washington, DC,” stated ADAO President, Linda Reinstein. “We’ve accomplished so much in the first ten years since ADAO was founded in 2004. We’ve welcomed more than 150 conference speakers from across the globe, presented in 19 countries, and built a network of more than 40,000. We offer a heartfelt thanks to the sponsors of our previous conferences and take this opportunity to particularly thank our 2014 donors and sponsors, who helped us take asbestos awareness to new levels of success. We excitedly look at collaborative efforts that work to end the tragedies associated with this lethal mineral.”

ADAO recognizes its 2014 Sponsors and Donors:

2014 Sponsors

Platinum Sponsors

Silver Sponsor

  • Early, Lucarelli, Sweeney and Meisenkothen, LLC

2014 Donors

Alton Miles for Meso Event
Diamond Donor

  • Emily Bankhead

Emerald Donors

  • Tom O’Neil Memorial Donations from Family and Friends
  • Tom’s Friends at the Antelope Club in Clearwater Florida
  • The Trafton and Maude Crandall Foundation
  • The Von St. James Family
  • Jill Cagle

Sapphire Donors

  • Marli Beer
  • Michele Mikulic

Garnet Donors

  • Esther O’Driscoll
  • Paul & Yvonne Hall

About the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was founded by asbestos victims and their families in 2004. ADAO is the largest non-profit in the U.S. dedicated to providing asbestos victims and concerned citizens with a united voice through our education, advocacy, and community initiatives. ADAO seeks to raise public awareness about the dangers of asbestos exposure, advocate for an asbestos ban, and protect asbestos victims’ civil rights. For more information, visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org.

Contact:

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO)

Kim Cecchini

Media Relations

202-391-5205


Kim@asbestosdiseaseawareness.org

Link to article: 

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization Thanks 2014 Sponsors, Donors, and Volunteers Who Led a Year of Change

Vivienne Westwood Tries To Give David Cameron Asbestos For Christmas

Fashion designer Vivienne Westwood has attempted to deliver asbestos as a Christmas present to David Cameron in a protest against fracking.

The 73-year-old, her son and a protester dressed as Santa Claus in a gas mask, turned up outside the gates of Downing Street with holding a clear box filled with the poisonous substance.

Westwood said she wanted to wish the PM a “merry fracking Christmas” but police did not allow the dubious gift to reach him.

vivienne westwood

Westwood with Santa

Westwood, who was also at Downing Street with her businessman son Joseph Corre, was campaigning about the alleged health risks linked to fracking, with the campaign Talk Fracking.

SEE ALSO:
That Vivienne Westwood ‘Eat Less’ Row Has Just Become Even More Awkward
Westwood Blogs: Big Ag – “Eat Less”

Malcolm McLaren, Corre’s father, died of cancer due to asbestos, and his mother Westwood warned that the controversial hydraulic fracturing technique used to extract oil and gas could become “the next asbestos or thalidomide”.

After the box of asbestos was rejected, Westwood and her son delivered “independent medical reports” on the consequences of fracking to the PM.

vivienne westwood

Westwood got to Downing Street – but the “present” wasn’t allowed in

vivienne westwood

Westwood warned fracking could become “the next asbestos or thalidomide”.

Asked if she expected the Prime Minister to listen to their message, Westwood said: “Will David Cameron listen to us? He lost a child, he must have some sympathy, and he’s not connecting the dots.”

“They link very clearly the chemicals used in fracking industry to some really horrible, serious illnesses,” 47-year-old Corre said.

“Birth defects in children, horrible cancers, skin diseases, rashes, nosebleeds, stunted growth, all kinds of things.

“We are lucky to have this information in advance from the terrible situation that his happening right now in the United States.

“We have the opportunity now, and I hope David Cameron takes it, to put an end to what could be something quite disastrous for the UK.

“David Cameron has no democratic mandate to be pushing this through on to the British people. This is something the entire country is going to start waking up to.”

The protest came after New York state governor Andrew Cuomo’s administration announced yesterday that it would ban fracking after a report concluded that it poses potential health risks.

Corre said that his inspiration for taking a stance against fracking was his father’s death from cancer aged 64.

“He died a really horrible death. It was quite something and I wouldn’t want to wish that on to anybody or anybody’s family.”

The protesters claimed that chief scientific adviser Professor Sir Mark Walport warned in his annual report that the Government has not given proper consideration to the potential health risks of fracking.

But Walport denied that the view that fracking could be the next asbestos or thalidomide should be attributed to him.
Rather, it was the view of another author, Andy Stirling, who contributed an evidence document to the annual report.

Sir Mark said: “With regard to fracking, the hydraulic fracturing of shale to obtain natural gas and oil, I fully endorse the report of the Royal Society and the Royal Academy of Engineering.

“Of course, methane is a fossil fuel, but as long as it is burned efficiently and fugitive emissions of methane gas are minimised, it is a less harmful fossil fuel than coal and oil, and is an important way-station on the global journey towards low-carbon energy.

“The scientific evidence is clear that any environmental or geological risks can be managed effectively in the UK as long as operational best practices are implemented and enforced through effective regulation.”

Downing Street declined to respond to Ms Westwood’s comments about Cameron’s son.

Gaythorne asbestos meeting

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Amanda Richards, general manager of Queensland’s Asbestos-Related Disease Society said northside residents were now worried after several “dumps” of old asbestos sheeting were located.

“Every day we are getting more phone calls from people who lived in the area or who worked at the factory,” Ms Richards told Radio 4BC.

Ms Richards said people told her organisation of different dumping grounds for broken-up asbestos from the factory.

“It seems to be spreading out wider and wider every time I get another phone call,” she said.

She said the concerns had emerged after newer residents move into the suburb and began to create gardens and renovate older homes.

“They are starting to find asbestos in their yard. It may even be that they may not even be able to dig because their house may be on an asbestos dump.”

She said residents were finding small pieces of older blue and brown asbestos in the garden.

However she in one area she went to look at near Kedron Brook Creek there was “sheet upon sheet upon sheet” of asbestos.

She said local residents told her that trucks from the factory would dump asbestos near a drain that runs into Kedron Brook.

Ms Richards said she had spoken with residents about “older dimpled fibro” sheeting made from asbestos.

Concerns were first raised last month about the former Wunderlich plant in suburban Gaythorne.

Residents told a law firm specialising in asbestos-related claims of seeing clouds of dust in streets around the factory which left windows and washing coated in white powder.

It has been reported that 20 cases of asbestos- related compensations claims with former residents have been finalised, though this could not be confirmed on Tuesday night.

Ms Richards said it was now a Queensland Government responsibility to repair.

“Now that we know that these dumps are around, we need the government to deal with it,” she said.

“And whether it is public land or private land, something has to be put in place to either seal the asbestos off, or dig it up and dump it properly in the mines site.”

A Queensland Health spokesperson could not be contacted on Tuesday night.

ABC Television reported that Queensland Health representatives at the public meeting told residents that because the asbestos being found was old, any risk was “low”.

However Fairfax Media understands a state government investigation will identify where asbestos is being found in Gaythorne and Mitchelton and the history of the Wunderlich factory site.











Original article – 

Gaythorne asbestos meeting

ADAO Hosts “Jammin’ for Asbestos Awareness” Concert with the Bob Rahe Family, Featuring Renowned National and Local …

LOS ANGELES–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), the largest independent non-profit organization in the U.S. which combines education, advocacy, and community to help ensure justice for asbestos victims; today announced the “Jammin’ for Asbestos Awareness” Concert September 26 in Omaha, Nebraska. Hosted in conjunction with the Bob Rahe Family, the event features top national and local performers who are joining together to celebrate the life of asbestos victims.

The concert, which coincides with National Mesothelioma Awareness Day, was inspired by the memory of Bob Rahe, who lost his battle to mesothelioma. ADAO is sponsoring the concert to further its efforts as the leader in building asbestos awareness communities in the fight against asbestos.

“As the only organization dedicated to combining education, advocacy, and community through a truly global, volunteer-driven effort, ADAO is excited to support the Jammin’ for Asbestos Awareness Concert as another great example of how we can all come together to fight deadly asbestos diseases,” stated ADAO Co-Founder and President Linda Reinstein. “We owe our sincere thanks to our volunteers, interns, supporters, donors, patients and their families, LeadershipScience Advisory Board, and our National Spokesperson Jordan Zevon, who will be featured at the event. Our network includes over 20,000 individuals eager to live in a world without asbestos; we expresses our sincere gratitude to the Bob Rahe Family for being a part of this network, and organizing this event in memory of Bob.”

“The Bob Rahe Family supports the efforts of ADAO in all respects,” stated the family spokesperson for the event. “Bob Rahe was a father, brother, and uncle who came into contact with asbestos during a summer job. We had no idea that over 30 years later, he would be diagnosed with a deadly cancer relating to this exposure. Many people are unaware that the U.S. continues to import asbestos into our country, and that we are still utilizing products that contain this poisonous hazard. We are organizing this event to promote education and awareness. Maybe, one day, with all of us armed with much more knowledge than we had yesterday, we can look towards a cure.”

The concert will take place at 7 pm on September 26 at the Slowdown, located at 729 North 14th Street in Omaha; doors open at 6 pm. Interested parties can purchase tickets online or at the door for $20 each. The first 50 ticket holders to enter the Slowdown will receive a free event t-shirt.

PERFORMERS:

Local Bands:
The Jiggawatts, CleverLumpy GravyMandown, and Cosmic Radio

National Singers/Musicians:
Jordan Zevon, ADAO National Spokesperson
Troi Atkinson, Mesothelioma Patient

Despite its known dangers, there is still no global ban on asbestos, and it continues to claim lives. Exposure to asbestos, a human carcinogen, can cause mesothelioma, lung, gastrointestinal, laryngeal, and ovarian cancers; as well as non-malignant lung and pleural disorders. The World Health Organization estimates that 107,000 workers around the world will die every year of an asbestos-related disease, equaling 300 deaths per day.

About the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was founded by asbestos victims and their families in 2004. ADAO is the largest non-profit in the U.S. dedicated to providing asbestos victims and concerned citizens with a united voice through our education, advocacy, and community initiatives. ADAO seeks to raise public awareness about the dangers of asbestos exposure, advocate for an asbestos ban, and protect asbestos victims’ civil rights. For more information, visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org.

Contact:

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO)

Kim Cecchini, 202-391-5205

Media Relations


Kim@asbestosdiseaseawareness.org

Link to original: 

ADAO Hosts “Jammin’ for Asbestos Awareness” Concert with the Bob Rahe Family, Featuring Renowned National and Local …

Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency faces the chop

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Mr Tighe has spent nine months in the new job and has already taken a particular interest in Canberra’s pressing problem of 1050 homes containing remnant loose amosite asbestos in the form of Mr Fluffy insulation. Mr Tighe has labelled these homes unliveable and has called on the ACT and Commonwealth governments to come together to seek a solution for affected families.

Meanwhile, asbestos disease support groups have warned of the human cost of abandoning a whole-of-government approach and accused the Coalition of a split over the issue.

Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency head Peter Tighe.

Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency head Peter Tighe. Photo: Louie Douvis

When Labor set up the agency last year following the recommendations of a two-year review into Australia’s asbestos problems, it received bipartisan support from the Coalition.

At the time the legislation was being tabled, Liberal Senator Eric Abetz told the Senate: “Now that we as a community are fully aware of all the dangers of asbestos and the effects that it has on people exposed to it, it makes good sense for all sides of politics and for unions and employers to join together to try to overcome the legacy issues that are clearly out there. Those legacy issues will remain with us as a country for at least another 30 years.”

Senator Abetz also highlighted the flaws in the existing approach to asbestos management throughout Australia. “The involvement of multiple governments across these diverse areas means that efforts to date to address asbestos issues have been fragmented and duplicative,” he said.

Senator Abetz is now the Employment Minister in charge of the agency. A spokeswoman said on Thursday: “The Commission of Audit’s proposals are recommendations to government; they are not recommendations by government. No decisions have yet been made in relation to the agency. The government remains committed to working with the states and territories to remove asbestos risks and this will not change.”

But seven asbestos disease support groups – including the Bernie Banton Foundation, Asbestos Diseases Society of Australia and the Asbestos Victims Association – warned there would be a human cost of abandoning a whole-of-government approach. They are joined by the Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union, which has also called for continued funding of the agency to maintain safeguards for workers.

Australia has the highest per capita rate of asbestos diseases in the world, with the deadly substance still found in millions of homes and workplaces.

Asbestos has claimed the lives of more than 33,000 Australians, and the groups said in a joint statement “an independent, national agency is a significant step in the fight against asbestos diseases, providing a strong, focused, consistent, co-ordinated national approach to improved asbestos education and removal activities”.

ACT Work Safety Commissioner Mark McCabe, who is the local appointee to the agency, said it would be “a huge loss if the agency folded”.

“It is co-ordinating a national response to the management of asbestos and taking a leadership role to ensure it is done appropriately,” he said. “Without that, the potential is a continued fragmented approach to what is one of the most serious safety issues confronting our society”.

The head of the Fluffy Owners and Residents Action Group Brianna Heseltine said the agency had played a vital role in informing owners and residents about Mr Fluffy’s troubling legacy on their homes.

“Mr Tighe’s call for the demolition of our homes put Canberra on high alert about the serious health risks posed by the likelihood of ongoing loose-fill asbestos contamination, and drew attention to the absence of legislative protections for residents,” she said. “The ACT government’s February 18 letter was conspicuously silent on the main issue at stake for our community – health – focusing instead on the increased burdens owners must bear when carrying out even minor internal works.

“Owners and residents are likely to feel left high and dry if the agency is abolished only weeks after putting this vital issue on the map.”











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Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency faces the chop

Geologists find natural asbestos fibers in Southern Nevada

LAS VEGAS — Removing asbestos from an old building can be hazardous and expensive. So what happens if the ground outside is covered with the stuff for miles around?

Thats what a team of University of Nevada, Las Vegas geologists is trying to figure out after the surprise discovery of potentially toxic, asbestos-type minerals in rocks and dust from Boulder City to the southeastern edge of the Las Vegas Valley.

UNLV geology professor Brenda Buck said this marks the first discovery of naturally occurring asbestos fibers in Southern Nevada.

A peer-reviewed study detailing the find was published last month in the journal of the Soil Science Society of America.

So how worried should everyone be?

At this point we know enough to know there is a hazard. We dont know what the risk is, Buck told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. Theres a lot of work that needs to be done. Until we know more, it would be a good idea to avoid dust from those areas.

That could be a tall order.

The study area takes in all of Boulder City and a wide swath of the Eldorado Valley, with tendrils that reach to the shore of Lake Mead and into the oldest parts of Henderson.

Its not everywhere, but I think youre going to have a hard time not finding it, Buck said. In every sample we looked at we found it. We found it pretty easily, too. I didnt have to look very hard.

For one test, Buck spent about three hours walking her horse along a dirt road in Boulder City. When she was done, she found asbestos fibers on her pants and her shoes.

The last thing we want to do is upset people or cause a panic. But on the other side, we dont want to give people assurances we cant give, said UNLV geologist Rodney Metcalf, who partnered with Buck on the study. We cant in good conscience say theres no problem.

The long, thin minerals were forged roughly 13 million years ago in the roots of volcanoes, also known as plutons.

Boulder City sits on top of one of these plutons, Metcalf said.

(Page 2 of 3)

The fibers have been weathering from the ground for the past 12 million years or so, giving them plenty of time to spread out, Buck said.

She specializes in something called medical geology, basically the study of the health impacts of minerals. She was in the midst of sampling arsenic in the dust blowing from Nellis Dunes when she came across a fibrous mineral in one of her samples. She later started talking to Metcalf about the asbestos-like fibers he was studying in northwestern Arizona, and the two decided to go looking for trouble in similar rock deposits in Southern Nevada.

What they mostly found was a mineral called actinolite, one of six types of asbestos regulated as a toxic substance by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Buck said she notified several people at the EPA about her discovery.

Asbestos fibers cant be absorbed through the skin, but if inhaled or swallowed they can spawn a range of deadly diseases that might not develop for a decade or decades.

The real pathway to humans is in the air, Metcalf said. The fibers are too tiny to be seen with the naked eye and so light that they can stay aloft indefinitely once theyve been stirred up by the wind or the tires on a vehicle.

Asbestos exposure is linked to mesothelioma, cancer of the lungs, larynx and ovaries, depressed immune function, and other disorders.

Theres no known safe amount, Buck said. The good news is not everyone who is exposed gets sick.

Buck, Metcalf and company plan to continue their research and expand their study area under a three-year grant from the Bureau of Land Management.

That work will include taking a closer look at other potential trouble spots in Clark County, most of it contained within the roughly 1,200 square miles of desert between U.S. 95 and the Colorado River from Boulder City to the southern tip of the state.

Buck said the bureau wants to know more about where such deposits are and what kind of risks they pose. Theyre worried about their workers, she said.

Meanwhile, researchers from the University of Hawaii are in the early stages of tests to determine how carcinogenic the fibers in Southern Nevada might be. They also plan to conduct a health assessment to see if any documented cases of mesothelioma, a rare cancer closely associated with asbestos, could be the result of environmental exposure in or around Boulder City, Buck said.

(Page 3 of 3)

Metcalf said asbestos is actually a loaded term, with varying definitions used by doctors, geologists and environmental regulators. For example, he said, the fibers he has found in Mohave County, Ariz., do not meet the regulatory definition of asbestos. But that doesnt mean theyre safe. In fact, they are similar to those found in Libby, Mont., where so much toxic soil was spread around by a nearby mine that the entire small town has been declared a Superfund site by the Environmental Protection Agency.

You get this debate about is this asbestos or is it not, Metcalf said. Its really not the issue. The issue is, is it toxic.

Buck grew up in Montana and has cousins who got sick and died in Libby.

She said she started taking special precautions in the field after the first fibers were found around Boulder City.

As soon as I knew they were there, I sure as hell did. I wear a mask, Buck said.

The discovery also forced her to revamp her lab at UNLV to make it safer.

The whole point is dont let it get into the air. You cant just drag it in and expose everyone to it, Buck said.

For the same reason, Buck has decided not to take college students into the field with her to help collect samples as she normally would. She doesnt want to expose them to something with the potential to shorten their lives

Theyre just so young, Buck said.

See the article here:

Geologists find natural asbestos fibers in Southern Nevada

Geologists find natural asbestos fibers in Nevada

LAS VEGAS — Removing asbestos from an old building can be hazardous and expensive. So what happens if the ground outside is covered with the stuff for miles around?

Thats what a team of University of Nevada, Las Vegas geologists is trying to figure out after the surprise discovery of potentially toxic, asbestos-type minerals in rocks and dust from Boulder City to the southeastern edge of the Las Vegas Valley.

UNLV geology professor Brenda Buck said this marks the first discovery of naturally occurring asbestos fibers in Southern Nevada.

A peer-reviewed study detailing the find was published last month in the journal of the Soil Science Society of America.

So how worried should everyone be?

At this point we know enough to know there is a hazard. We dont know what the risk is, Buck told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. Theres a lot of work that needs to be done. Until we know more, it would be a good idea to avoid dust from those areas.

That could be a tall order.

The study area takes in all of Boulder City and a wide swath of the Eldorado Valley, with tendrils that reach to the shore of Lake Mead and into the oldest parts of Henderson.

Its not everywhere, but I think youre going to have a hard time not finding it, Buck said. In every sample we looked at we found it. We found it pretty easily, too. I didnt have to look very hard.

For one test, Buck spent about three hours walking her horse along a dirt road in Boulder City. When she was done, she found asbestos fibers on her pants and her shoes.

The last thing we want to do is upset people or cause a panic. But on the other side, we dont want to give people assurances we cant give, said UNLV geologist Rodney Metcalf, who partnered with Buck on the study. We cant in good conscience say theres no problem.

The long, thin minerals were forged roughly 13 million years ago in the roots of volcanoes, also known as plutons.

Boulder City sits on top of one of these plutons, Metcalf said.

(Page 2 of 3)

The fibers have been weathering from the ground for the past 12 million years or so, giving them plenty of time to spread out, Buck said.

She specializes in something called medical geology, basically the study of the health impacts of minerals. She was in the midst of sampling arsenic in the dust blowing from Nellis Dunes when she came across a fibrous mineral in one of her samples. She later started talking to Metcalf about the asbestos-like fibers he was studying in northwestern Arizona, and the two decided to go looking for trouble in similar rock deposits in Southern Nevada.

What they mostly found was a mineral called actinolite, one of six types of asbestos regulated as a toxic substance by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Buck said she notified several people at the EPA about her discovery.

Asbestos fibers cant be absorbed through the skin, but if inhaled or swallowed they can spawn a range of deadly diseases that might not develop for a decade or decades.

The real pathway to humans is in the air, Metcalf said. The fibers are too tiny to be seen with the naked eye and so light that they can stay aloft indefinitely once theyve been stirred up by the wind or the tires on a vehicle.

Asbestos exposure is linked to mesothelioma, cancer of the lungs, larynx and ovaries, depressed immune function, and other disorders.

Theres no known safe amount, Buck said. The good news is not everyone who is exposed gets sick.

Buck, Metcalf and company plan to continue their research and expand their study area under a three-year grant from the Bureau of Land Management.

That work will include taking a closer look at other potential trouble spots in Clark County, most of it contained within the roughly 1,200 square miles of desert between U.S. 95 and the Colorado River from Boulder City to the southern tip of the state.

Buck said the bureau wants to know more about where such deposits are and what kind of risks they pose. Theyre worried about their workers, she said.

Meanwhile, researchers from the University of Hawaii are in the early stages of tests to determine how carcinogenic the fibers in Southern Nevada might be. They also plan to conduct a health assessment to see if any documented cases of mesothelioma, a rare cancer closely associated with asbestos, could be the result of environmental exposure in or around Boulder City, Buck said.

(Page 3 of 3)

Metcalf said asbestos is actually a loaded term, with varying definitions used by doctors, geologists and environmental regulators. For example, he said, the fibers he has found in Mohave County, Ariz., do not meet the regulatory definition of asbestos. But that doesnt mean theyre safe. In fact, they are similar to those found in Libby, Mont., where so much toxic soil was spread around by a nearby mine that the entire small town has been declared a Superfund site by the Environmental Protection Agency.

You get this debate about is this asbestos or is it not, Metcalf said. Its really not the issue. The issue is, is it toxic.

Buck grew up in Montana and has cousins who got sick and died in Libby.

She said she started taking special precautions in the field after the first fibers were found around Boulder City.

As soon as I knew they were there, I sure as hell did. I wear a mask, Buck said.

The discovery also forced her to revamp her lab at UNLV to make it safer.

The whole point is dont let it get into the air. You cant just drag it in and expose everyone to it, Buck said.

For the same reason, Buck has decided not to take college students into the field with her to help collect samples as she normally would. She doesnt want to expose them to something with the potential to shorten their lives

Theyre just so young, Buck said.

More – 

Geologists find natural asbestos fibers in Nevada

Imported asbestos getting past Australian customs

Imported asbestos getting past Australian customs
Imported asbestos getting past Australian customs

Large shipments of products containing asbestos are entering Australia undetected by customs officials and it has some groups worried about worker safety.

Fibres were recently found in almost a dozen train engines and it is feared many more dangerous imports are slipping through.

While the manufacture of asbestos has been banned in Australia for more than quarter of a century, it is still rife in China, Russia and Brazil.

“It’s cheap to produce a product for housing and things like that, but it’s also killing people,” Terry Miller from the Asbestos Victims Association said.

Products containing the deadly fibres are then exported around the globe, including to Australia.

Last month, asbestos was found in the engines of ten trains during routine testing, sparking fears for worker safety.

“Our security system in Australia is so lax and through customs, if it looked like asbestos, these guys picked it, they should’ve done an analysis themselves,” Ian Sheppard from the Asbestos Diseases Society said.

It follows the recall of more than 20,000 Great Wall and Chery vehicles with asbestos gaskets last year.

In June, customs officials in Adelaide intercepted and destroyed a shipment of motorcycles containing asbestos.

Mechanics admit they do not expect to find asbestos in motorbikes and therefore do not undertake precautionary measures, but they fear cheap imported parts could be putting them at risk.

Those caught trying to bring asbestos merchandise into the country face fines of up to $850,000.

Source: 

Imported asbestos getting past Australian customs

Imported asbestos products getting past Australian customs

Imported asbestos getting past Australian customs
Imported asbestos getting past Australian customs

Large shipments of products containing asbestos are entering Australia undetected by customs officials and it has some groups worried about worker safety.

Fibres were recently found in almost a dozen train engines and it is feared many more dangerous imports are slipping through.

While the manufacture of asbestos has been banned in Australia for more than quarter of a century, it is still rife in China, Russia and Brazil.

“It’s cheap to produce a product for housing and things like that, but it’s also killing people,” Terry Miller from the Asbestos Victims Association said.

Products containing the deadly fibres are then exported around the globe, including to Australia.

Last month, asbestos was found in the engines of ten trains during routine testing, sparking fears for worker safety.

“Our security system in Australia is so lax and through customs, if it looked like asbestos, these guys picked it, they should’ve done an analysis themselves,” Ian Sheppard from the Asbestos Diseases Society said.

It follows the recall of more than 20,000 Great Wall and Chery vehicles with asbestos gaskets last year.

In June, customs officials in Adelaide intercepted and destroyed a shipment of motorcycles containing asbestos.

Mechanics admit they do not expect to find asbestos in motorbikes and therefore do not undertake precautionary measures, but they fear cheap imported parts could be putting them at risk.

Those caught trying to bring asbestos merchandise into the country face fines of up to $850,000.

Read original article: 

Imported asbestos products getting past Australian customs

Asbestos fears: concern hundreds exposed during Logan council work

A former Logan City council worker says he was told to dump asbestos cement in general landfill and fears hundreds of people may have been exposed to the deadly fibres.

Scott Campbell was in charge of a team of men who laid footpaths across the Logan region, south of Brisbane.

From 1999 to 2003, his team replaced old asbestos Telstra pits with plastic pits.

He says he was exposed to deadly asbestos fibres every day as he laid down nearly half the footpaths in Logan suburbs.

“When you’re doing footpaths you just scrape the grass off the top and a lot of time you hit these pits,” he said.

“Because they’re only five to 10 millimetres thick, they just explode.”

Despite raising concerns, Mr Campbell says the workers were not given safety gear and were told to dump asbestos cement in general landfill.

“You’ve got to compete with contractors so you’ve got to do everything on the sly – you’ve got to take shortcuts and that’s the way it was handled,” he said.

Crews smash asbestos pit in front of school

He says hundreds of asbestos pits were mishandled.

In one instance, crews hit a pit in front of Crestmead State School as children were leaving to go home for the day.

He says they often disturbed old asbestos pits in front of passers-by.

“Because council had a lot more overheads than contractors, we had to cut a lot more corners to compete in the open market with contractors,” he said.

Mr Campbell now worries he will contract an asbestos-related disease.

A spokesman for Logan City Council says it takes both the safety of employees and correct asbestos handling and management procedures very seriously.

“Council is not aware of the specific allegations being raised, however would be happy to investigate the detailed allegations should the former employee wish to raise them directly with council,” the spokesman said.

More workers falling ill from asbestos exposure

The ABC has also learnt that a growing number of former Telstra workers are contracting deadly asbestos-related diseases.

Raymond Colbert from the Asbestos Related Disease Support Society Queensland says the overall number of workers falling ill from asbestos is steadily on the rise.

“[There’s] a lot more places it’s coming from now. You’ve got the people who are disturbing the existing product and they’re doing it without that training and without that supervision,” he said.

Among those are Telstra staff who built or maintained the pits.

“They should be sent a letter: ‘You may have been exposed, monitor your health’ and all that is is getting regular chest x-rays,” he said.

More than 120 compensation claims have been made to Telstra in the past decade. Eighty people have received payouts and 11 claims are still pending.

A Telstra spokesman says the telco aims to manage compensation claims of any type to ensure they are handled sensitively and expeditiously.

“We handle asbestos claims on a case-by-case basis and claims are met from general operating costs,” the spokesman said.

Asbestos support group solicitor Thady Blundell says there is serious concern about Telstra workers.

“We’re starting to see people now develop asbestos disease who were exposed in the ’70s and ’80s, so there’s been a regular incidence of asbestos disease amongst Telstra workers,” he said.

“These pits and pipes were used all over the country.”

Original source – 

Asbestos fears: concern hundreds exposed during Logan council work