_ap_ufes{"success":true,"siteUrl":"friableasbestos.com","urls":{"Home":"http://friableasbestos.com","Category":"http://friableasbestos.com/category/current-asbestos-news/","Archive":"http://friableasbestos.com/2015/04/","Post":"http://friableasbestos.com/asbestos-firms-ready-to-fight-silvers-slanted-legal-system/","Page":"http://friableasbestos.com/effect-asbestos-mesothelioma/","Nav_menu_item":"http://friableasbestos.com/69/"}}_ap_ufee

October 18, 2018

Asbestos roofing fully removed from fire damaged warehouse

Crew from Queensland Asbestos Management Services complete their final asbestos clean at the fire damaged warehouse in North Mackay.
Crew from Queensland Asbestos Management Services complete their final asbestos clean at the fire damaged warehouse in North Mackay. Peter Holt

ASBESTOS roof sheeting has been fully removed from the fire damaged warehouse in North Mackay that housed the Boomerang Secondhand store destroyed by fire in late April.

Reconstruction work on the World War Two era building on Harbour Road is expected to begin within weeks once final clearance is given by Work Health and Safety Queensland..

The cleanup of the historic Walkers Market shed began in mid-July and the slow process involved removing the asbestos debris after the roof collapsed during the blaze.

A crew from Queensland Asbestos Management Services (QAMS) are finalising their decontamination work to ensure all particles are removed with a final clean of the timber framework.

QAMS employees work on demolition of Walkers Market shed on Harbour Road, Mackay. Photo Peter Holt / Daily Mercury
QAMS employees work on demolition of Walkers Market shed on Harbour Road, Mackay. Photo Peter Holt / Daily Mercury Peter Holt

A Work Health and Safety Queensland spokesman said the asbestos contaminated material and debris was transported to an asbestos waste facility in accordance with government requirements.

Police have charged two youths with arson as a result of the fire.

QAMS employees work on demolition of Walkers Market shed on Harbour Road, Mackay. Photo Peter Holt / Daily Mercury
QAMS employees work on demolition of Walkers Market shed on Harbour Road, Mackay. Photo Peter Holt / Daily Mercury Peter Holt

Source article:

Asbestos roofing fully removed from fire damaged warehouse

What to do when you find asbestos in your home

VICTORIA – Renovations can be stressful for a homeowner, especially when dealing with an older home where asbestos may be hiding under old flooring or around heating ducts.

Before Madeleine Bragg and her husband bought their 1940s home in Fernie, B.C., they had it inspected for asbestos, which was commonly mined and used for its high tolerance to heat. Roof tiles and insulation were tested and the conclusion was their new home was free of asbestos.

Story continues below

Unfortunately it wasn’t until they began renovating and were ripping up the old linoleum flooring in the kitchen that they discovered their home did, in fact, have asbestos.

Pulling up the flooring revealed a second layer of linoleum that had a paper lining containing asbestos.

“I was six months pregnant. I was flipping out,” says Bragg. “I thought it was so awful and if I had known asbestos was in the house we wouldn’t have bought it, or would have paid significantly less for it.”

The couple looked into removing the asbestos themselves, but when they realized the costs of the disposal bags and having to ship it out of town to be properly discarded, they opted to have professionals do the job for them.

Mid-construction the Braggs had to leave their home to be bagged and correctly treated before work could resume.

Summer Green, owner of RemovAll Remediation Services in Victoria, says it is possible for homeowners to do a smaller job themselves if they follow proper guidelines, such as those from WorkSafeBC.

“If it was my daughter, and her husband wanted to deal with asbestos on his own, I would say wet it down, follow the approved guidelines, and they would probably be OK,” says Green.

Many of the guidelines in place for abatement and removal are meant to protect construction workers and contractors who may come into contact with asbestos on a regular basis, but homeowners should be cautious and informed when removing asbestos.

According to Green, any home built before the 1990s could contain asbestos in the insulation and drywall and around boilers and pipes.

“Older houses are often heated by boilers and hot water registers,” she says. “Those pipes were covered in asbestos, often 80 to 90 per cent asbestos. With forced air heating they used duct tape, but at that time it was asbestos tape. Any white tape you see on your ducts contains asbestos, and they don’t even bother testing it.”

Many homeowners are unaware they have asbestos in their house until they become involved in a home renovation project where testing is required for work permits.

Green says it is possible for people to have lived in a house containing asbestos for many years without any health problems because issues arise only when asbestos fibres are released into the air.

“You can go up in an attic and breathe in fibreglass insulation and it can get in your lungs, and it can cause problems, but with fibreglass insulation the fibres are straight fibres,” says Green. “But with an asbestos fibre no matter how small you make it or break it down they are constantly splitting and have a barb on them.”

Fibreglass fibres can be coughed out of someone’s lungs, but with asbestos, Green says, fibres hook into the walls of your lungs and you can’t get them out.

According to the Government of Canada, potential health problems from asbestos exposure include asbestosis (scarring of the lungs which makes it hard to breathe), mesothelioma (a cancer of the lining of the chest or abdominal cavity) and lung cancer.

The cost of removing asbestos has begun to affect not only the way homeowners proceed with renovations, but it can also affect the cost of purchasing and insuring a home.

“In real estate, inspectors are noticing asbestos in the insulation on the forced air ducts or pipes, and homeowners have to deal with it before a house is sold,” says Green.

“Mortgage companies are saying they won’t finance until the asbestos is gone, and insurance companies may not insure without a clearance letter, which can affect the price of a home.”

© The Canadian Press, 2014


Report an error

View original article:

What to do when you find asbestos in your home

Demolition company fined for dumping asbestos waste

Demolition company fined for dumping asbestos waste

Published: 11:45AM Thursday May 15, 2014 Source: ONE News

  • Asbestos waste (Source: Supplied)

    Asbestos waste – Source: Supplied

A demolition and digger hire company has been fined $67,687 for illegally disposing of asbestos-contaminated demolition waste and clearing native vegetation.

The charges relate to illegal activities at the defendant’s property, including disposing of demolition waste containing asbestos in April last year, clearing native vegetation in a special ecological area and illegal filling between August 2010 and April last year.

The prosecution was brought jointly by Tauranga City Council and Bay of Plenty Regional Council and the affected site is now listed with both councils as contaminated.

In 2013 the two councils both received complaints about demolition material containing asbestos being taken from a church demolition site in Fraser Street to the Grange Road site bordering the reserve. The demolition work was being carried out by C Side Services, a company owned by Stephen Craig Walling.

Samples dug up at the Grange Road site owned by ‘C’ Side Services tested positive for white, brown and blue asbestos, and Mr Walling was issued an abatement notice to stop work. He said he was putting clean-fill, dirt and concrete onto the property to form a driveway to a house site and to create a grassed garden area with exotic palms. He said he had taken 15 truckloads of demolition waste from the church to the Grange Road site and had also allowed two other contractors to deposit concrete and dirt there.

A total of 372 square metres of the Special Ecological Area and its five metre buffer zone had been cleared of vegetation and a concluded that material containing asbestos at the site posed an immediate and long-term risk to human health if no management controls were put in place.

The fines include $22,687 for asbestos disposal, $22,000 for clearing the special ecological area and $23,000 for illegal filling. The defendant is also required to re-vegetate the area and remediate the contaminated land.

    Copyright © 2014, Television New Zealand Limited. Breaking and Daily News, Sport & Weather | TV ONE, TV2 | Ondemand

    Link:

    Demolition company fined for dumping asbestos waste

    Locals criticise asbestos waste plan

    Read the article:

    Locals criticise asbestos waste plan

    Asbestos discovery blocks Boulder City bypass


    Continued here:

    Asbestos discovery blocks Boulder City bypass

    Asbestos removed from school


    More »





    Continue reading:

    Asbestos removed from school

    Asbestos tracking software lets NT schools breathe easier

    A new centralised information management system is being deployed to help maintain asbestos registries as an audit is conducted of government-run Northern Territory schools.

    Seventy-three out 75 public schools in the territory have buildings that are known to contain asbestos.

    “As we all know, [builders] were supposed to stop using asbestos in the mid ’80s, but they kept using the product until they ran out or had pressure put on them to stop using it,” said Kevin Anderson, a project manager for Building Services at the NT’s Department of Infrastructure.

    Buildings that were completed before 31 December, 2003, may contain asbestos, Anderson said. Mostly of the asbestos is non-fibrous, though some buildings contain the more dangerous friable or fibrous asbestos. Inhalation of asbestos can have deadly consequences, including lung cancer and mesothelioma.

    Details of asbestos and any asbestos-removal work at schools are maintained in a hardcopy register that contractors carrying out building or maintenance works need to familiarise themselves with before any construction or refurbishment takes place.

    Queensland-headquartered engineering and environmental consulting firm OCTIEF won a $763,000 territory government tender in January to carry out a full asbestos audit in public schools and put an electronic register system in place and maintain it for 12 months.

    To maintain the centralised register, a newly released software system – OCTFOLIO – is being used.

    “It’s bringing the old, cumbersome hard copy asbestos register up to today’s standard in regards to making an electronic copy so we can update it easily, and keep track of the asbestos removal,” Anderson said.

    Although the system allows for centralised tracking of known asbestos in schools, hardcopy registers must still be maintained for inducting builders before works are undertaken. Additionally, Anderson said that an alert system lets schools know when their register is due for auditing.

    “Every year you’re supposed to do an audit on your registers, then every five years it’s got to be audited by people who are trained to be able to identify asbestos,” he said.

    Schools will be able to update their registers quickly and then produce a hardcopy based on the central database, Anderson said. “So contractors coming in [to the school] when they sign in, they are actually indicating that they’ve viewed the asbestos register and they’re pretty confident it’s up to speed and up to date.”

    “When you remove the asbestos-containing material, and there are many, many forms of it, you can now update the register straight away. That’s the main thing – with the old, manual system it just was too hard for people to keep it up to date.”

    Excerpt from: 

    Asbestos tracking software lets NT schools breathe easier

    Willow Grove man charged with illegal asbestos removal

    David Mermelstein, 53, of Elkins Park, was indicted Aug. 27 following a grand jury investigation on five counts of illegal removal of asbestos, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Philadelphia.

    In April 2001, Mermelstein, who owns a business in Willow Grove, purchased a large, old furniture warehouse in Northeast Philadelphia, which he operated under the name of Red, White and Black Furniture, at 10175 Northeast Ave., according to the indictment. Insulated pipes that ran throughout the building were covered with insulation made of or containing asbestos, it says.

    The indictment alleges that from September 2009 through April, 2010, after learning the cost of proper asbestos removal, Mermelstein hired day laborers instead of licensed asbestos contractors to remove asbestos from the commercial property. Mermelstein directed the removal of asbestos by these laborers without telling them they were removing asbestos and without proper safety equipment and “in a manner that did not comply with asbestos work practice standards” required by federal law, the indictment says.

    If convicted, Mermelstein faces a maximum possible sentence of 25 years imprisonment and a fine of $1.25 million.

    The case was investigated by the Environmental Protection Agency and the City of Philadelphia’s Air Management Services. It is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Virgil B. Walker and Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Patricia Miller.

    David Mermelstein, 53, of Elkins Park, was indicted Aug. 27 following a grand jury investigation on five counts of illegal removal of asbestos, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Philadelphia.

    In April 2001, Mermelstein, who owns a business in Willow Grove, purchased a large, old furniture warehouse in Northeast Philadelphia, which he operated under the name of Red, White and Black Furniture, at 10175 Northeast Ave., according to the indictment. Insulated pipes that ran throughout the building were covered with insulation made of or containing asbestos, it says.

    The indictment alleges that from September 2009 through April, 2010, after learning the cost of proper asbestos removal, Mermelstein hired day laborers instead of licensed asbestos contractors to remove asbestos from the commercial property. Mermelstein directed the removal of asbestos by these laborers without telling them they were removing asbestos and without proper safety equipment and “in a manner that did not comply with asbestos work practice standards” required by federal law, the indictment says.

    If convicted, Mermelstein faces a maximum possible sentence of 25 years imprisonment and a fine of $1.25 million.

    The case was investigated by the Environmental Protection Agency and the City of Philadelphia’s Air Management Services. It is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Virgil B. Walker and Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Patricia Miller.

    Continued:  

    Willow Grove man charged with illegal asbestos removal

    Asbestos removal at Wyckoff school is annual project

    Asbestos removal in the boiler room at Sicomac School in Wyckoff was performed in mid August in preparation for the installation of new boilers in 2014, according to Superintendent of Schools Richard Kuder. Signs posted on the door are required by law.

    “No one is allowed to enter the school until the site is cleared with air sampling,” Kuder said in an email last week. “It is common that we do some type of asbestos removal work every year in the schools.”

    All work is “properly permitted and approved within strict state and federal guidelines,” Kuder said.

    Kuder said the school was expected to open “within a day or two.”

    The asbestos removal cost $32,400 and was performed by Lesco Services Inc. out of Wallington.

    See the original article here – 

    Asbestos removal at Wyckoff school is annual project

    Report downplays asbestos risk at gallery renovation

    A compliance report received by the City of Greater Geraldton has revealed that the amount of airborne asbestos during work to remove the asbestos roof of the Regional Art Gallery was “significantly below” the acceptable level.

    Work on the facility last month sparked some community concern about the risk of air-borne contamination in the CBD.

    Environment Site Services monitored the work and concluded it was fully compliant with all codes of practice endorsed by the National Association of Testing Authorities.

    Mayor Ian Carpenter welcomed the report.

    “The City takes its duty of care very seriously and only employers contractors who adhere to all codes of practice, so the report is very reassuring,” he said.

    The roof replacement contract was let to local business Crothers Constructions and work was expected to be completed this month.

    Mr Carpenter said a new air conditioning system would be installed later in the year.

    He said the major upgrade of the building would elevate the art gallery into an A-class gallery.

    Read original article: 

    Report downplays asbestos risk at gallery renovation