_ap_ufes{"success":true,"siteUrl":"friableasbestos.com","urls":{"Home":"http://friableasbestos.com","Category":"http://friableasbestos.com/category/current-asbestos-news/","Archive":"http://friableasbestos.com/2015/04/","Post":"http://friableasbestos.com/asbestos-firms-ready-to-fight-silvers-slanted-legal-system/","Page":"http://friableasbestos.com/effect-asbestos-mesothelioma/","Nav_menu_item":"http://friableasbestos.com/69/"}}_ap_ufee

September 20, 2018

Woman whose cancer was linked to asbestos died of ‘natural causes’

Woman whose cancer was linked to asbestos died of ‘natural causes’

Woman whose cancer was linked to asbestos died of ‘natural causes’

Woman whose cancer was linked to asbestos died of ‘natural causes’



First published


A WOMAN who suffered from cancer strongly linked to asbestos died despite avoiding exposure to it, an inquest heard.

Janet Binding, of Durland Close, New Milton, died on November 4 after contracting mesothelioma, a lung cancer usually caused by asbestos exposure. The 72-year-old had no occupational or family links to the substance, her husband Peter told the Winchester inquest.

She was admitted to Oakhaven Hospice in Lymington on October 15, Dr Frank McGinn said in a statement and died on November 4.

Senior central Hampshire coroner Grahame Short said there have been cases of “spontaneous” contraction of the disease and recorded a verdict of death by natural causes.

Original article: 

Woman whose cancer was linked to asbestos died of ‘natural causes’

Asbestos gave railway worker cancer, inquest hears

Asbestos gave Eastleigh railway worker cancer, inquest hears

Asbestos gave railway worker cancer, inquest hears

Asbestos gave railway worker cancer, inquest hears



First published




Hampshire Chronicle: Photograph of the Author

by

AN Eastleigh man who worked for 40 years at the town’s railway works died of cancer caused by prolonged exposure to asbestos, an inquest heard.

Eric Williams, 73, was employed at the works from 1956 to 1995 and was constantly exposed to the deadly dust which when inhaled can cause mesothelioma decades later.

He joined as apprentice aged 15 and worked his way up to chief foreman.

In a statement made shortly before his death in August, Mr Williams, of Passfield Avenue, said in the 1950s the carriages used to be sprayed with asbestos at night: “The asbestos hanged in the air. It was clearly visible. The asbestos dust and debris we gathered and recycled it as a filler and plugs.

In the 1960s Mr Williams renovated carriages: “A huge amount of dust was created. Asbestos was allowed to fall to the floor. I was showered in the face with asbestos dust. It created dust hanging in the air like mist.

“At no time was I ever warned about the dangers of being exposed to asbestos. No protection was provided, not even a mask.”

Senior Coroner Grahame Short at an inquest in Winchester ruled that the death from mesothelioma was caused by industrial disease.

Mr Short added: “Far too many men working in the carriage works have died as a result of this particular cancer.”

Visit site:  

Asbestos gave railway worker cancer, inquest hears

Enhanced regulations for work involving asbestos to be introduced

SINGAPORE: The Workplace Safety and Health (WSH) Council and the Ministry of Manpower have announced enhanced regulations for work involving asbestos, a substance that could potentially cause lung cancer.

Many older buildings, especially those built before 1990, may have asbestos-containing materials. These include corrugated roofs, ceiling boards and partition walls.

The new WSH (Asbestos) Regulations will replace the existing Factories (Asbestos) Regulations and take effect from May 1.

The new regulations come after three rounds of public consultations conducted last year.

Under the new regulations, an expert must be appointed to ascertain if asbestos-containing materials are present before starting demolition or renovation works on buildings built before 1 January 1991.

If asbestos is present, it must be removed before demolition can commence. The removal can only be carried out by an approved asbestos removal contractor, under proper supervision.

“This will ensure that workers carry out these work activities under proper management and protection. It will also prevent the release of asbestos fibres into the air which can affect the public,” said Senior Minister of State for Health and Manpower Dr Amy Khor.

To help the industry comply with the regulations, a new set of WSH guidelines on the management and removal of asbestos has been developed to guide contractors and building owners on the proper management of asbestos-containing materials.

In addition, a video has been produced with the aim of educating stakeholders on the health effects of asbestos exposure. The video will illustrate examples of where asbestos can be found and measures to apply in the management and removal process. 

Read the article: 

Enhanced regulations for work involving asbestos to be introduced