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January 18, 2018

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) Applauds Sens. Boxer and Markey for Introducing The Alan Reinstein and …

WASHINGTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), which combines education, advocacy, and community to help ensure justice for asbestos victims, today announced its support for the Alan Reinstein and Trevor Schaefer Toxic Chemical Protection Act, introduced by Senators Barbara Boxer (D-CA), Ranking Member of the Environment and Public Works Committee, and Edward Markey (D-MA), Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Superfund, Waste Management, and Regulatory Oversight. The bill provides critical safeguards to protect children and communities from the dangers of toxic chemicals and specifically calls for a ban on asbestos.

The legislation, aimed specifically at reforming the 1976 Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), includes these key provisions:

  • Protects children and vulnerable populations from harmful toxins
  • Provides stronger safety standards and quicker safety reviews of chemicals
  • Ensures exposure from chemical spills and leaks are addressed
  • Requires the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to act quickly to consider a ban on asbestos
  • Maintains states’ rights to protect people from dangerous toxic chemicals

The bill is named in honor of two cancer victims – Alan Reinstein and Trevor Schaefer. Alan lost his battle to mesothelioma in 2006 at the age of 66 and was the beloved husband of ADAO President Linda Reinstein, who co-founded ADAO in 2004. Trevor Schaefer, a victim of toxic exposure, was diagnosed with brain cancer at the age of 13.

Ms. Reinstein stated: “ADAO applauds Senator Boxer and Senator Markey for their leadership in helping to take further steps to eliminate exposure to asbestos, a known carcinogen that has caused the most occupational deaths in history. This bill, named after my late husband Alan, represents not only his courageous battle with mesothelioma, which he lost nine years ago, but it also represents the hundreds of thousands of other asbestos victims – past, present, and future – along with Americans who’ve been affected by other toxic chemicals. Asbestos is still legal and lethal in the United States, and the Alan Reinstein and Trevor Schaefer Toxic Chemical Protection Act will enable the EPA to, once and for all, ban asbestos. ADAO has worked with a coalition of more than 450 organizations, who support real TSC reform. I am certain everyone will be supportive and grateful for its introduction and passage.”

Conversely, ADAO strongly opposes the legislation introduced earlier this week by U.S. Sens. David Vitter (R-LA) and Tom Udall (D-N.M.) inappropriately named the “The Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act”. The bill purportedly designed to protect the public from toxic substances would allow asbestos to remain legal and widely used in the U.S.

“The fact that the Vitter-Udall bill will not even restrict, much less ban, the deadly substance that claims 30 lives a day is nothing short of a national travesty,” said Reinstein. “Any Senator who supports this industry proposal is in essence supporting the continuation of the toll asbestos has already had on millions of American families. The bill, embraced by the chemical industry, will only expose future generations to asbestos and many other highly toxic chemicals.”

Despite its known dangers, the U.S. has failed to ban asbestos and imports continue. Each year, asbestos claims the lives of 10,000 Americans. Exposure to asbestos, a human carcinogen, can cause mesothelioma, lung, gastrointestinal, laryngeal, and ovarian cancers; as well as non-malignant lung and pleural disorders. The World Health Organization estimates that 107,000 workers around the world will die every year of an asbestos-related disease, equaling 300 deaths per day.

About the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was founded by asbestos victims and their families in 2004. ADAO is the largest non-profit in the U.S. dedicated to providing asbestos victims and concerned citizens with a united voice through our education, advocacy, and community initiatives. ADAO seeks to raise public awareness about the dangers of asbestos exposure, advocate for an asbestos ban, and protect asbestos victims’ civil rights. For more information, visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org.

Contact:

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO)

Kim Cecchini

Media Relations

202-391-5205


Kim@asbestosdiseaseawareness.org

Source: 

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) Applauds Sens. Boxer and Markey for Introducing The Alan Reinstein and …

Statement from Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) Opposing Senate "Chemical Safety" Bill which Lets …

WASHINGTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), which combines education, advocacy, and community to help ensure justice for asbestos victims, today issued this statement from ADAO President and Co-Founder Linda Reinstein, in opposition to the legislation introduced today by U.S. Sens. David Vitter (R-LA) and Tom Udall (D-N.M.) inappropriately named the “Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act”. The bill purportedly designed to protect the public from toxic substances would allow asbestos to remain legal and widely used in the U.S.

“Asbestos exposure in the U.S. alone is responsible for at least 10,000 Americans dying each year from asbestos-related diseases,” said Linda Reinstein, president and co-founder of the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization. “The fact that the Vitter-Udall bill will not even restrict, much less ban, the deadly substance that claims 30 lives a day is nothing short of a national travesty. Any Senator who supports this industry proposal is in essence supporting the continuation of the toll asbestos has already had on millions of American families.”

The bill, embraced by the chemical industry, is widely considered to be worse than the current federal chemicals law, the Toxic Substances Control Act, or TSCA – a law so broken that EPA was unable to ban asbestos back in 1989.

“Any ‘chemical safety’ bill that does not ban asbestos isn’t worth the paper it’s printed on,” added Reinstein. “No other toxic chemical claims more lives and leaves more families without mothers, fathers, sons and daughters than asbestos. And the legislation offered by Mr. Udall and Mr. Vitter will only expose future generations to asbestos and many other highly toxic chemicals.”

About the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was founded by asbestos victims and their families in 2004. ADAO is the largest non-profit in the U.S. dedicated to providing asbestos victims and concerned citizens with a united voice through our education, advocacy, and community initiatives. ADAO seeks to raise public awareness about the dangers of asbestos exposure, advocate for an asbestos ban, and protect asbestos victims’ civil rights. For more information, visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org.

Contact:

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO)

Kim Cecchini

Media Relations

202-391-5205


Kim@asbestosdiseaseawareness.org

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Statement from Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) Opposing Senate "Chemical Safety" Bill which Lets …

Asbestos specialists to check NBN sites

The discovery of asbestos in pipes and pits owned by Telstra remains a safety concern, the boss of the company building the national broadband network says.

Telstra has stopped work preparing underground pipes and pits currently used by copper phonelines to house its fibre-optic cables, and deployed 200 specialists to look into breaches in asbestos management by its contractors.

The telco giant launched an audit of contractors this week after finding several cases of “non-compliant asbestos management and removal”.

“Telstra retain ownership of the pit and pipe infrastructure and retain the primary responsibility for the remediation of its infrastructure to make it fit for NBN practice,” NBN Co chief executive Mike Quigley told a parliamentary hearing on Thursday.

Prime Minister Julia Gillard said she expected Telstra to follow Australia’s asbestos laws amid fears workers may have been exposed to the hazardous fibre.

Ms Gillard told parliament there were no shortcuts in dealing with asbestos.

“All safety procedures must be adhered to,” she said.

Communications Minister Stephen Conroy said he had informed Telstra chief executive David Thodey of his concerns.

Senator Conroy said Telstra had an obligation to ensure its pits and ducts were safe, secure and ready for network builder NBN Co.

Telstra chief operations officer Brendon Riley said the telco would take every precaution to strengthen its asbestos management.

The Office of Asbestos Safety had also been tasked with co-ordinating a national response to the incidents, he said.

Mr Quigley said he welcomed Telstra’s audit.

“We are extremely concerned anytime we hear proper processes have not been followed.”

Mr Quigley said the number one priority for NBN Co was the health and safety of its contractors, workers and communities.

There were issues at sites with asbestos in Ballarat, Hobart and South Australia.

Mr Quigley said Telstra and NBN Co would work together to further improve how they notified people of asbestos activity in their areas.

NBN Co is leasing the pits and ducts from Telstra for its cable rollout.

Liberal senator Michael Ronaldson asked Senator Conroy if he agreed with Communications Electrical and Plumbing Union official David Mier’s comparison of the rollout to the government’s failed pink batts insulation scheme.

“Telstra has acknowledged that the handling of the material has been insufficient, hasn’t followed procedure and requirements,” Senator Conroy replied.

Australia Post says it has stopped delivering mail to a western Sydney street amid fears of asbestos contamination near a pit at Penrith.

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Asbestos specialists to check NBN sites