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October 20, 2018

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) Announces Unity and Remembrance Brunch Sunday, April 19

WASHINGTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), which combines education, advocacy, and community to prevent exposure and ensure justice for asbestos victims, today announced the Unity and Remembrance Brunch to close out its 11th Annual Asbestos Awareness Conference on April 17 – 19, 2015, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, VA.

The brunch, which takes place from 9:30-11:30 am on Sunday, April 19, is an annual tradition for the ADAO community and brings together asbestos victims, loved ones, and supporters with select presentations and musical performances in an intimate setting, culminating with an inspirational candle lighting ceremony. This year’s agenda includes:

  • Opening remarks from Dr. Richard Lemen, ADAO Science Advisory Board Co-Chair
  • Keynote speech from Sue Vento, Widow of the late Congressman Bruce Vento
  • Presentation from Lou Williams, Mesothelioma Warrior; Australian Director, Global Ban Asbestos Network (GBAN); and Social Media Awareness Officer, Asbestos Diseases Foundation of Australia (ADFA)
  • Performance by Jill Cagle, Mesothelioma Widow and Singer
  • Performance of “I’m Not Ready Yet” by Folk Rock Artist, Troi Atkinson
  • Candle Lighting led by Ellen Trunkelrott, ADAO Board Member

“This year’s conference comes on the heels of the introduction of the “The Alan Reinstein and Trevor Schaefer Toxic Chemical Protection Act.” (S. 725) led by Senators Barbara Boxer and Edward Markey” which would ensure the EPA could ban asbestos,” stated Linda Reinstein, President and Co-Founder of ADAO. “Our Unity and Remembrance Brunch is a key example of our continued spirit of hope, and the shared commitment to work towards an asbestos free global community. I am hopeful that one day, the tragedy of asbestos will be a thing of the past, negating the need for such a gathering.”

“The Unity and Remembrance Brunch is important to me – I’m dying of mesothelioma,” said Lou Williams. “If only asbestos had been banned in Australia and around the world when the science confirmed asbestos caused disease and deaths, I might not be suffering today from a preventable and deadly asbestos-caused cancer. But I will not die in vain and remain hopeful that through unity, we will one day see a global ban on asbestos. It is my most important dying wish.”

ADAO’s 11th Annual Asbestos Awareness Conference features more than 40 renowned medical experts and asbestos victims from ten countries, focusing on the latest advancements in asbestos disease prevention, treatment for mesothelioma and other asbestos-caused diseases, and global ban asbestos advocacy. To register for ADAO’s 2015 conference, click here.

Despite its known dangers, asbestos remains legal and lethal in the USA and imports continue. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung, gastrointestinal, laryngeal, and ovarian cancers; as well as non-malignant lung and pleural disorders. The World Health Organization estimates that 107,000 workers around the world will die every year of an asbestos-related disease, equaling 300 deaths per day.

About the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was founded by asbestos victims and their families in 2004. ADAO is the largest non-profit in the U.S. dedicated to providing asbestos victims and concerned citizens with a united voice through our education, advocacy, and community initiatives. ADAO seeks to raise public awareness about the dangers of asbestos exposure, advocate for an asbestos ban, and protect asbestos victims’ civil rights. For more information, visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org. ADAO, a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, does not make legal referrals.

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Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) Announces Unity and Remembrance Brunch Sunday, April 19

ADAO Announces Global Experts to Present at the 2015 Conference

LOS ANGELES–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), which combines education, advocacy, and community to help ensure justice for asbestos victims, today announced the speakers scheduled to present at the upcoming 11th Annual Asbestos Awareness Conference, “Where Knowledge and Action Unite” , April 17-19 2015 at the Crystal Gateway Marriot in Arlington, VA. ADAO also will be celebrating its 11th year of asbestos awareness success since the organization’s inception in 2004. ADAO is the only U.S. nonprofit that organizes annual conferences dedicated to preventing and eliminating asbestos-caused diseases.

Nearly 40 renowned experts and asbestos victims from ten countries will present the latest advancements in disease prevention, global advocacy, and treatment for mesothelioma and other asbestos-caused diseases. The April 18, 2015, conference includes four powerful, cutting–edge sessions:

  • Progress and Challenges from the Frontline
  • Medical Advancements: Diagnosing and Treating Mesothelioma and Other Asbestos-Related Diseases
  • Prevention: What Is It? Where Is It? What Do I Do?
  • Advocacy: Global Ban Asbestos Action

The conference underscores ADAO’s new “Hear Asbestos. Think Prevention.™” campaign, which is focused on continual global efforts aimed at preventing asbestos exposure to help end the tragedy of asbestos disease. ADAO began as a grassroots advocacy, spurred by Alan Reinstein’s mesothelioma diagnosis, beloved husband of the organization’s Co-Founder and President, Linda Reinstein.

“I look at where ADAO has come since I began this journey as the confused and angry wife of an innocent asbestos victim and it has made me realize even more how we are all connected by a strong thread of hope that weaves itself across continents and lives,” stated Ms. Reinstein. “As we celebrate the 11th year anniversary of ADAO and welcome our global supporters and speakers to this year’s conference, I’m reminded more than ever that there is strength in numbers.”

Collaborating with organizations around the world for a global asbestos ban since its inception in 2004, ADAO has become a leader in social media advocacy and community outreach for asbestos victims, their families, and loved ones to share support, resources, and provide hope. ADAO has shifted education and awareness activities into high gear – with an unparalleled effort to educate the public and medical community about asbestos-related diseases and preventing exposure. Responsible for three Surgeon General asbestos warnings and ten Senate Resolutions designating April as Asbestos Awareness Week each year, ADAO is recognized as one of the largest organizations fighting for justice on behalf of asbestos victims in the US and abroad.

The recently finalized conference list of speakers includes a highly esteemed group of research, advocacy, and medical experts from ten countries:

  • Arturo Aguilar, Filmmaker, Mexico
  • Syed Mezab Ahmed, World Asbestos Congress, Pakistan
  • Troi Atkinson, Mesothelioma Patient and 2015 Honoree, USA
  • Emily Bankhead, Mesothelioma Widow and 2014 Honoree, USA
  • Dr. Brad Black, Chief Executive Officer and Medical Director at Center for Asbestos Related Disease and ADAO Science Advisory Board, USA
  • Jill Cagle, Mesothelioma Widow and Singer, USA
  • Dr. Robert Cameron, University of California, Los Angeles and The West Los Angeles VA, USA
  • Barry Castleman, ScD, Author of the “Asbestos: Medical and Legal Aspects,” and ADAO Science Advisory Board, USA
  • Mark Catlin, Service Employees International Union, USA
  • Earl Dotter, Photojournalist, USA
  • Geoff Fary, Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency, Chairman, Australia
  • Professor Dean Fennell, Chair of Thoracic Medical Oncology, University of Leicester and 2015 Honoree, United Kingdom
  • Dr. Raja Flores, Chairman, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Mount Sinai Health System and Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization Science Advisory Board, USA
  • Dr. Arthur Frank, Professor of Public Health and Chair Emeritus of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the Drexel University School of Public Health and ADAO Science Advisory Board Co-Chair, USA
  • Fernanda Giannasi, Associação Brasileira dos Expostos ao Amianto (ABREA), Brazil
  • Marc Hindry, Association Nationale de Défense des Victimes de l’Amiante (ANDEVA), France
  • Dr. Philippe Gomes Jardim, The Brazilian Labor Public Ministry, Brazil
  • Doug Larkin, Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization, Co-Founder, USA
  • Richard Lemen, PhD, MSPH, Assistant Surgeon General, USPHS (ret.), Rear Admiral, USPHS (ret.) and ADAO Science Advisory Board Co-Chair, USA
  • Dr. Guadalupe Aguilar Madrid, Mexico
  • Dr. Luis Antonio Camargo De Melo, General Labour Prosecutor, Brazil
  • Captain Aubrey K. Miller, M.D., M.P.H., Senior Medical Advisor, Office of the Director, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, USA
  • Celeste Monforton, DrPH, MPH, Professorial Lecturer Dept of Environmental & Occupational Health Milken Institute School of Public Health George Washington University, USA
  • Patrick J. Morrison, Assistant to the General President for Occupational Health, Safety and Medicine, USA
  • Sandra Neuenschwander, Mesothelioma Mother, USA
  • Dr. Christine Oliver, Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization Science Advisory Board, USA
  • Ellen Patton, Mesothelioma Patient and 2015 Honoree, USA
  • Dr. Jorma Rantanen, Professor at International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH) and 2015 Honoree, Finland
  • Linda Reinstein, Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization, President/CEO, USA
  • Barry Robson, Asbestos Diseases Foundation of Australia (ADFA), Australia
  • Domani Tripam, Mesothelioma Daughter, USA
  • Ellen Tunkelrott, Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization Board Member, USA
  • Sue Vento, Widow of the late Congressman Bruce Vento, USA
  • Cameron Von St James, Mesothelioma Husband, USA
  • Yvonne Waterman, Ph.D. LL.M., The Netherlands
  • Dr. John Wheeler, Associate Director for Science at CDC/ATSDR, USA
  • Lou Williams, Mesothelioma Patient and Asbestos Diseases Foundation of Australia (ADFA), Australia
  • Jordan Zevon, Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization Spokesperson and Musician, USA

Despite its known dangers, there is still no global ban on asbestos, and it continues to claim lives. Exposure to asbestos, a human carcinogen, can cause mesothelioma, lung, gastrointestinal, laryngeal, and ovarian cancers; as well as non-malignant lung and pleural disorders. The World Health Organization estimates that 107,000 workers around the world will die every year of an asbestos-related disease, equaling 300 deaths per day.

ADAO will hold its Eleventh Annual International Asbestos Awareness Conference on April 17 – 19, 2015, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, VA.

About the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was founded by asbestos victims and their families in 2004. ADAO is the largest non-profit in the U.S. dedicated to providing asbestos victims and concerned citizens with a united voice through our education, advocacy, and community initiatives. ADAO seeks to raise public awareness about the dangers of asbestos exposure, advocate for an asbestos ban, and protect asbestos victims’ civil rights. For more information, visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org.

Contact:

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO)

Kim Cecchini

Media Relations

202-391-5205


Kim@asbestosdiseaseawareness.org

See the original article here:  

ADAO Announces Global Experts to Present at the 2015 Conference

Monks' Secret: Asbestos Lurking Beneath Byzantine Wall Paintings

Hundreds of years before asbestos became ubiquitous in the construction industry, Byzantine monks used the fibrous material in plaster coatings underlying their wall paintings during the late 1100s, new research shows.

Asbestos is a type of natural, rock-forming mineral known for its ability to separate into long, flexible fibers. It has long been thought that asbestos fibers, which are corrosion- and combustion-resistant, were first integrated into such things as plaster, finish coatings and floors after the Industrial Revolution.

But while investigating the 12th-century paintings in the Byzantine monastery Enkleistra of St. Neophytos in Cyprus, UCLA researchers discovered the magnesium silicate mineral, chrysotile (white asbestos), in the finish coating of the plaster underneath a portion of a wall painting. The chrysotile provided a smooth layer with a mirrorlike surface for the painting. [See Photos of the Byzantine Monastery and 12th-Century Paintings]

“[The monks] probably wanted to give more shine and different properties to this layer,” said UCLA archaeological scientist Ioanna Kakoulli, lead author of the new study, published online last month in the Journal of Archaeological Science. “It definitely wasn’t a casual decision — they must have understood the properties of the material.”

A long history of use

Though all six asbestos minerals are now known to be carcinogenic, people have taken advantage of the fibrous materials’ unique properties for millennia. About 4,500 years ago, artisans mixed asbestos minerals with clay to produce stronger pottery. And 2,000 years ago, asbestos fibers were woven into textiles to make fireproof napkins (that were “washed” by tossing them into fire), or to make a special fabric that could separate human ashes from funeral pyre material during cremations, Kakoulli said. “It was considered to have magical powers,” she told Live Science.

In the late 19th century, people used asbestos in industrial products — including cements, wall plasters, joint (drywall) compounds, fire-retardant coatings and roofing, among other things — to increase their durability, insulation and weathering protection.

Given this history, Kakoulli and her colleagues weren’t expecting to find asbestos on the walls of Enkleistra of St. Neophytos. They initially set out to see if there was any change in the materials used to create the monastery’s numerous wall paintings over time.

“We wanted to see how the technological part of making these paintings follows or reveals anything of what we see in their iconography and style,” Kakoulli said.

The researchers analyzed some of the paintings on site using various techniques, including infrared, ultraviolet and X-ray fluorescence imaging. They also collected micro-samples of the paintings and further analyzed their molecular and elemental makeup with powerful scanning electron microscopes and other methods.

A surprising find

One of the paintings they inspected depicted the “Enthroned Christ” holding a book with a red frame. When they analyzed the red frame, they found an asbestos-rich layer that was applied as a finish coating between a red paint layer and a plaster layer made up mostly of plant fibers. “So far, we’ve only found it in relation to those red pigments,” Kakoulli said.

Interestingly, the main deposits of asbestos in Cyprus come from a high-elevation area approximately 38 miles (60 km) from the monastery, which is near the coast. This location suggests the monks may have been involved in a kind of interregional trade for the asbestos.

The discovery raises many questions, such as why the asbestos was used in this context (and only for the red frame in the painting). It’s also curious why the fibrous material apparently wasn’t used again in coatings until the 19th century. [Image Gallery: Stunning Byzantine Mosaic]

The scientists are now searching for answers. They plan to return to Cyprus to characterize more of the paintings at Enkleistra of St. Neophytos. Kakoulli also hopes to revisit other wall paintings she’s previously studied in Cyprus, to see if they also contained asbestos.

“I have a feeling that it’s something that can be easily missed,” Kakoulli said. “This was quite an accidental discovery.”

Two online reports provide further details on the project.

Follow Joseph Castroon Twitter. Follow us @livescience, Facebook& Google+.

Copyright 2014 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

From: 

Monks' Secret: Asbestos Lurking Beneath Byzantine Wall Paintings

ADAO Announces 10th Annual International Asbestos Awareness Conference Honorees

LOS ANGELES–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

Today, the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), the largest non-profit dedicated to preventing asbestos-related diseases, announced its Sunday keynote speaker and honorees for the upcoming Tenth Annual International Asbestos Awareness Conference, entitled Where Knowledge and Action Unite.

The conference will be held April 4 – 6, 2014, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, VA. More than 30 renowned medical experts and asbestos victims from ten countries will speak on the latest advancements in asbestos disease prevention, treatment for mesothelioma and other asbestos-caused diseases, and global ban asbestos advocacy. The conference will also include an Awards and Recognition Dinner and a Unity and Remembrance Brunch. The 2014 Sunday keynote speaker will be Ms. Susan Vento, widow of the late Congressman Bruce Vento, who died of mesothelioma in 2000.

“The 2014 ADAO conference is an event like no other. It builds on nine years of increasingly successful events for the unified asbestos disease awareness community,” said Dr. Richard Lemen, retired U.S. Assistant Surgeon General and ADAO Science Advisory Board Co-Chair. “I am truly excited to be a part of this global conference.”

“As ADAO unveils our 10th annual conference, we are reminded that while we have greatly advanced education, asbestos is still legal and lethal in the United States,” stated Linda Reinstein, President/CEO and Co-Founder of ADAO. “More than 31 million tons of asbestos have been used since 1900 and imports continue today. Asbestos is an invisible toxin that kills 30 Americans each day and prevention remains the only cure.”

Each year, ADAO’s conference recognizes outstanding individuals and organizations from around the world that serve as a voice for asbestos victims, raising awareness and advocating for a worldwide asbestos ban. ADAO is delighted to announce the 2014 ADAO Honorees which include: Congressman Henry Waxman, Dr. David Egilman, Dr. Ken Takahashi, The Association Nationale de Défense des Victimes de l’Amiante (ANDEVA), Bill Ravanesi, Congressman Bruce Vento (posthumously), Janelle Bedel (posthumously), Heather Von St. James, and Lou Williams.

To register for ADAO’s 2014 conference, visit the following link: http://bit.ly/18UUGWH

About the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was founded by asbestos victims and their families in 2004. ADAO is the largest non-profit in the U.S. dedicated to providing asbestos victims and concerned citizens with a united voice through our education, advocacy, and community initiatives. ADAO seeks to raise public awareness about the dangers of asbestos exposure, advocate for an asbestos ban, and protect asbestos victims’ civil rights. For more information, visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org.

Contact:

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO)

Kim Cecchini, 202-391-5205

Media Relations


Kim@asbestosdiseaseawareness.org

Visit source:  

ADAO Announces 10th Annual International Asbestos Awareness Conference Honorees

Asbestos policy review could save lives


Asbestos policy review could save lives


GEORGINA STYLIANOU

Last updated 05:00 20/11/2013

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An EQC policy of covering up asbestos in hundreds of quake-damaged Canterbury homes could be overhauled by the Government amid concerns about serious health risks.

Government officials have previously raised concerns about the way asbestos is being handled in post-earthquake Canterbury, but say the introduction of the Health and Safety at Work Bill next month will make guidelines more clear for construction workers.

Staff from WorkSafe – the new health and safety regulator – were in Christchurch yesterday and told The Press it would be naive to think there would not be asbestos-related illnesses in the future.

The Earthquake Commission (EQC) has previously said up to 43,000 Christchurch homes due for quake repairs could contain the potentially fatal substance.

It estimated that in 10 per cent of cases, asbestos found in ceilings or walls was encased behind plasterboard, instead of being removed.

A Fletcher spokesman said about 15 to 16 per cent of houses that tested positive for asbestos were being encased.

The chairman of the WorkSafe establishment board, Gregor Coster, believed the encasement policy should be “reconsidered carefully” because it posed serious health risks in the future.

“An electrician might be rewiring a house and is put at risk and this is not what we should be doing in terms of managing health and safety,” he said.

An EQC spokesman yesterday said if there were any changes to regulations it would comply.

Coster said contractors across the region needed to be better at testing for asbestos.

“The truth of the matter is I am concerned about the potential exposure . . . particularly during that early demolition phase,” he said.

Geoffrey Podger, the acting chief executive of the WorkSafe establishment unit, said only a certain percentage of asbestos breaches in the city were identified.

“Our inspectors can’t be everywhere, but equally if everyone could carry out their legislative duties, they wouldn’t need to be,” he said.

MBIE health and safety inspector Steve Moran said the influence of big project management firms – including Arrow International and Fletcher – was having a “huge effect in lifting the performance of smaller companies”.

Canterbury District Health Board medical officer of health Dr Alistair Humphrey, who has been fighting for EQC to review its encasement policy since 2011, said it would have been cost-effective and logical to remove asbestos from houses when repairs were being done.

He urged the Government to follow in the footsteps of Australia and make a commitment to remove asbestos.


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However, it was good news the policy could be reviewed.

“The Christchurch community and the New Zealand population will reap the benefits of [WorkSafe and MBIE’s] courage,” Humphrey said.

– © Fairfax NZ News

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Asbestos policy review could save lives

Asbestos halts work on roof replacement at Science and Technology Museum

The Canada Science and Technology Museum has halted work on replacing its roof after asbestos was discovered in roofing materials in the nearly 50-year-old building.

The museum discovered earlier this month, on the first day of the renovation project, that cement in the roof had a one-per-cent concentration of asbestos, said Fernand Proulx, the interim president and CEO of the Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation.

“As we started taking some of the membrane off, we notice some of the materials didn’t look quite like concrete,” Proulx said Friday.

When testing confirmed the presence of asbestos, the museum corporation halted work and brought in Stantec Consulting Ltd. to test air quality, beginning the evening of Oct. 16.

The tests did not detect the presence of asbestos fibre, and showed only “minimal or non-existent particulate readings, well below required standards,” the corporation said in a news release.

Proulx said the museum is now conducting air quality tests on a regular basis. “We’ve had zero traces at this point and we’re monitoring it,” he said.

The museum plans to reseal the roof over the next two or three days and postpone the roof replacement for several months while it figures out how to proceed, Proulx said. “Because of the asbestos, we’re going to have to have a different approach to take (the old roof) out.”

While Proulx stressed there was no risk to museum visitors or staff, he said the problem will cause “a little disturbance” in the museum, with plastic protecting some of the artifacts. He doesn’t expect the problem to interfere with the public’s ability to visit the museum.

“If through any kind of adjustments to the ceiling there was any kind of risk where the air quality was diminished, we’d have to take other actions at that point,” he said. “But we’re pretty confident we can manage it.”

The St. Laurent Boulevard museum is housed in a former bakery warehouse that is needs $3.4 million in major structural repairs, according to the museum corporation’s 2013-14 budget.

The budget estimated the cost of the roof replacement at $2.5 million, but Proulx said that is likely to rise because of the asbestos problem.

He said it may be possible to do “a little bit” of the work on the roof before the summer if the museum corporation decides to do it in phases. “With all the tourists, it’s not the kind of construction you want to have in a peak summer season,” he said.

dbutler@ottawacitizen.com

twitter.com/ButlerDon

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Asbestos halts work on roof replacement at Science and Technology Museum

At SUNY-ESF, SALTS Lab Focuses on Asbestos, Airborne Fibers


At SUNY-ESF, SALTS Lab Focuses on Asbestos, Airborne Fibers

Syracuse Asbestos Laboratory Testing Service earns New York State Department of Health certification

Newswise — As universities nationwide are under pressure to prove their economic viability and value to the community and prospective students, a team at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) in the Salt City is accomplishing just that with the new testing lab called SALTS.

Syracuse Asbestos Laboratory Testing Service, founded by microscopy experts on the ESF campus in Syracuse, N.Y., has earned New York State Department of Health certification as an official testing lab for airborne fibers as of November 2012. SALTS staffers examine filtered samples from air monitors at construction sites, schools or other structures for the kind of microscopic fibers that could indicate the presence of asbestos or other contaminants that would require special handling or remediation at the site.

The lab has been busy in its first months of full operation and is processing multiple sets of samples weekly with eight to 12 samples per set, said Robert P. Smith, lead technical director of SALTS and assistant director of the N.C. Brown Center for Ultrastructure Studies at ESF. The cost for the service is competitive with other labs and varies depending on the desired six- or 24-hour turnaround time, Smith said.

Turnaround time can be essential particularly if concern about suspect material has shut down a public building, stopped a renovation or forced residents from apartments, he noted.

In the start-up phase, the first six months of 2013, the lab generated nearly $10,000 in revenue for the N.C. Brown Center with another $2,000 outstanding, said Dr. Susan Anagnost, SALTS technical director and director of the N.C. Brown Center. Fees charged for the lab service help offset maintenance expenses for the costly equipment used in the center, said Anagnost, who also is chair of the Department of Sustainable Construction Management and Engineering at SUNY-ESF.

The process of getting the lab certified and into full operation has taken almost two years. Anagnost and Smith earned their certifications in asbestos analysis in 2011 at the McCrone Institute in Chicago. Now Smith teaches students a course in fiber analysis that leads to their state certification.

It’s not often that a student can take one course and with that class alone become a valuable commodity in the employment market but that’s what happens at SALTS for those microscopy students who complete the certification process. Of the four students he has trained, four are employed by SALTS now and the lab has a continuing need for more, he said.

Tiffany Brookins-Little is an undergraduate studying biotechnology and works as client services associate and analyst for the lab. She plans to use her microscopy skills in medical research. In her work at the lab, Brookins-Little notes, she gains problem-solving and leadership skills along with specific knowledge about the six different types of asbestos. The other employees are Kaitlyn Smith, an ESF biology graduate; Jeremy Sullivan, a master of science candidate in chemistry; and Taylor Della Rocco, a sophomore majoring in environmental science.

SALTS staffers do not gather fibers in the field, but rather examine samples supplied by contractors. After slides are prepared from the samples, SALTS technicians search by light microscopy for the presence of fibers as small as 5 microns long with the distinctive shape and in the numbers that U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration or National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health rules say require more extensive testing and perhaps remediation.

Students in Smith’s class gain essential expertise in the operation of various microscopes that make them highly valuable in research and in the commercial market, he said. Microscopy involves not only knowing how to operate each type of microscope, but also knowing which type suits a particular kind of research, how samples must be prepared for their reliable interpretation and proper record keeping and maintenance. The complexity of the field of microscopy and the need for skills in it for research, scholarship and industry has led ESF to create a new minor in microscopy that includes the use of both light and electron microscopes, Anagnost said.

The lab’s work is not limited to asbestos although it created a fine acronym, she said. The microscope reveals details about many different materials. While the problem of asbestos contamination could be finite, it’s not likely to go away soon nor is the prospect of fiber contamination. The lab was created in response to a demand from contractors experiencing considerable delays in getting results from labs backlogged with requests for testing, Smith said. Dr. Beth Arthur, a recent staff research scientist was instrumental in recognizing how the lab could meet the needs of industry and she gathered much of the documentation needed for certification of the lab, noted Anagnost.

Demand has been sufficient for SALTS to begin to seek backing for adding a new transmission electron microscope (TEM), which would be used in research and teaching as well as asbestos determination, said Anagnost. Certain types of samples require TEM for asbestos identification, and a locally operated machine such as this would shorten the turnaround time for local contractors.

The 30-year-old transmission electron microscope at ESF in its own pristine room is booked for use. A log shows recent users from Syracuse University, ESF and industry in Central New York have had need for the instrument even as much more modern equipment has come on the market. While scanning electron microscopes scan the surface of an object, transmission electron microscopes transmit an electron beam through a thin section of material allowing observations on a cellular level. There’s much more to be revealed by the latest technology, however.

“The new ones easily see and identify atoms,” Smith said.

Anyone wishing to contact the SALTS lab can email salts@esf.edu.


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At SUNY-ESF, SALTS Lab Focuses on Asbestos, Airborne Fibers

Asbestos Testing Certificate Awarded to Syracuse NY College

asbestos lawsuit at lawfuel.comSyracuse, New York – The State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY ESF) in Syracuse, New York has recently been awarded a certification as an official testing facility for air samples by the New York State Department of Health. Named SALTs, the Syracuse Asbestos Laboratory Service will not only be able to test air samples collected from construction zones and schools for asbestos but will be able to provide businesses a clear understanding of the potential hazards in the ambient air.

Structured as a fully-functional business, SALTs is competitive with other certified testing facilities. However, the advantage of SALTs is the close association with SUNY ESF: students will have a first hand experience of analyzing indoor air quality as well as handling the complex equipment required for testing.

Though the acronym directly points to one common, yet dangerous air pollutant – asbestos – SALTs analyzes air samples for a variety of other contaminates. Students and staff of SALTs do not collect air samples but rely on clients to provide the samples for analysis.

Asbestos is a highly toxic, naturally occurring mineral used primarily in building materials before 1980. Virtually every structure built in the middle of the twentieth century in the United States contains some form of asbestos products. Generally, asbestos was combined with other materials such as concrete to strengthen the original material and provide heat insulating properties.

Friable asbestos or asbestos that has become airborne through disturbing or damaging the material poses a considerable health threat. Exposure to friable asbestos can lead to lung cancer, asbestosis and mesothelioma cancer. For any property undergoing construction, knowing whether asbestos is present and whether the asbestos has become airborne is critical. SALTs like other certified testing facilities aims to ensure clients a complete understanding of how toxic the air in a work space is. Working unprotected in an environment with unsafe levels of asbestos or other pollutants is dangerous.

This article – 

Asbestos Testing Certificate Awarded to Syracuse NY College

Asbestos exposure, asbestosis, and smoking combined greatly increase lung cancer risk

Apr. 12, 2013 — The chances of developing lung cancer associated with asbestos exposure, asbestosis and smoking are dramatically increased when these three risk factors are combined, and quitting smoking significantly reduces the risk of developing lung cancer after long-term asbestos exposure, according to a new study.

“The interactions between asbestos exposure, asbestosis and smoking, and their influence on lung cancer risk are incompletely understood,” said lead author Steven B. Markowitz, MD DrPH, professor of occupational and environmental medicine at the School of Earth & Environmental Sciences at Queens College in New York. “In our study of a large cohort of asbestos-exposed insulators and more than 50,000 non-exposed controls, we found that each individual risk factor was associated with increased risk of developing lung cancer, while the combination of two risk factors further increased the risk and the combination of all three risk factors increased the risk of developing lung cancer almost 37-fold.”

The findings were published online ahead of print publication in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

The study included 2,377 long-term North American insulators and 54,243 male blue collar workers with no history of exposure to asbestos from the Cancer Prevention Study II. Causes of death were determined from the National Death Index.

Among non-smokers, asbestos exposure increased the rate of dying from lung cancer 5.2-fold, while the combination of smoking and asbestos exposure increased the death rate more than 28-fold. Asbestosis increased the risk of developing lung cancer among asbestos-exposed subjects in both smokers and non-smokers, with the death rate from lung cancer increasing 36.8-fold among asbestos-exposed smokers with asbestosis.

Among insulators who quit smoking, lung cancer morality dropped in the 10 years following smoking cessation from 177 deaths per 10,000 among current smokers to 90 per 10,000 among those who quit. Lung cancer rates among insulators who had stopped smoking more than 30 years earlier were similar to those among insulators who had never smoked.

There were a few limitations to the study, including the fact that smoking status and asbestosis were evaluated only once and that some members of the control group could have been exposed to relatively brief periods of asbestos.

“Our study provides strong evidence that asbestos exposure causes lung cancer through multiple mechanisms,” said Dr. Markowitz. “Importantly, we also show that quitting smoking greatly reduces the increased lung cancer risk seen in this population.”

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The above story is reprinted from materials provided by American Thoracic Society (ATS).

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Asbestos exposure, asbestosis, and smoking combined greatly increase lung cancer risk

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization Praises Senator Baucus for Introducing the Ninth Annual Resolution …

LOS ANGELES–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

The Asbestos
Disease Awareness Organization
 (ADAO), which combines education,
advocacy and community as the leading U.S. organization serving as the
voice of asbestos victims, today applauds Senator Max Baucus (D-MT) and
cosponsors for again introducing Senate Resolution 66 designating the
first week of April as “National Asbestos Awareness Week” that seeks to
“raise public awareness about the prevalence of asbestos-related
diseases and the dangers of asbestos exposure.”

“ADAO applauds the U.S. Senate for its introduction of the Ninth
Annual Resolution
recognizing National Asbestos Awareness Week,”
said Linda Reinstein, President and Co-Founder of the Asbestos Disease
Awareness Organization. “As a mesothelioma
widow
, it is still shocking to me that most Americans are unaware
that asbestos has not been banned and exposure continues at home, work,
and in our children’s schools. Since 2005, educational collaborative
efforts have increased, as prevention remains the only cure for
mesothelioma and other asbestos-caused diseases. We know education saves
dollars and lives and ADAO looks forward to the U.S. Senate unanimously
passing this important Resolution designating April 1 – 7 to be a week
of awareness to protect families throughout the nation.”

“Sadly, we do not have a cure for cancers caused by asbestos, but they
are preventable. Asbestos Awareness Week promotes saving lives through
prevention. On behalf of ADAO, thank you Senator Baucus, and your
supporters Senator Barbara Boxer (D-CA), Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL),
Senator Johnny Isakson (R-GA), Senator Patty Murray (D-WA), Senator
Harry Reid (D-NV), and Senator Jon Tester (D-MT) for helping us save
lives through designating a week for asbestos disease awareness to
remind the American public that asbestos-related diseases still occur
but that the good news is they can be prevented,” said Dr. Richard A.
Lemen, ADAO
Science Advisory
 Co-Chair and retired Assistant Surgeon General.

Asbestos is a known human carcinogen and exposure can cause
mesothelioma, lung, gastrointestinal, laryngeal and ovarian cancers, as
well as non-malignant lung and pleural disorders. The World
Health Organization estimates that 107,000 workers around the world will
die every year of an asbestos-related disease –
 equaling 300 deaths
per day.

ADAO will hold its Ninth
Annual International Asbestos Awareness Conference
 on March 23 in
Washington, D.C. To register for ADAO’s 2013 conference, visit the
following link: http://bit.ly/Svdp0c

About Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was founded by asbestos
victims and their families in 2004. ADAO seeks to give asbestos victims
and concerned citizens a united voice to raise public awareness about
the dangers of asbestos exposure. ADAO is an independent global
organization dedicated to preventing asbestos-related diseases through
education, advocacy, and community. For more information, visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org.

Contact:

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO)

Doug Larkin

Director of Communications

202-391-1546


doug@asbestosdiseaseawareness.org
www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org

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The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization Praises Senator Baucus for Introducing the Ninth Annual Resolution …