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April 20, 2018

ADAO Applauds U.S. Surgeon General for Statement on the Dangers of Asbestos in Support of National Asbestos Awareness …

WASHINGTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), which combines education, advocacy, and community to prevent exposure and ensure justice for asbestos victims, today announced its strong support for the statement from Vice Admiral Vivek H. Murthy, U.S. Surgeon General, that reaffirms the dangers of asbestos. According to the statement: “National Asbestos Awareness Week is April 1-7 – a good time to remind Americans about the health dangers of asbestos exposure. Asbestos, a natural mineral fiber that is found in rock and soil, was widely used as insulation and fireproofing material in homes, commercial buildings, ships and other products, such as paints and car brakes. In recent years, asbestos use has decreased dramatically after it was linked to illnesses, including lung cancer, mesothelioma, and asbestosis.” He continued, “because of its use in so many products, asbestos is still of special concern.”

Since 2004, ADAO has been working with Congress and the White House to prevent asbestos exposure in efforts to eliminate deadly asbestos-related diseases. The U.S. Surgeon General’s Statement coincides with National Asbestos Awareness Week, (April 1 – 7) as designated by the Senate in its 11th consecutive annual resolution that includes an indisputable list of facts about the dangers of asbestos. This important educational week raises public awareness about the prevalence of asbestos-related diseases and the dangers of asbestos exposure and coincides with the international educational campaign – Global Asbestos Awareness Week.

“It is unconscionable that our country continues to import deadly asbestos and that it continues to be used in products that we are unknowingly exposed to,” stated Linda Reinstein, ADAO Co-Founder and President. “We are grateful to U.S. Surgeon General Murthy for his statement reaffirming the dangers of asbestos, helping to spread the word that there is no safe level of exposure. It is especially meaningful on the second day of Global Asbestos Awareness Week, which ADAO has dedicated to the previous U.S. Surgeon General Statements and the past 11 U.S. Senate Resolutions. More than fifty countries have banned asbestos, but the U.S. is not one of them. 10,000 Americans die each year due to asbestos exposure and the time for a ban is long overdue. Millions of tons of asbestos remain in U.S. homes, schools, offices, and factories. Enough is truly enough.”

Despite its known dangers, asbestos remains legal and lethal in the USA and imports continue. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung, gastrointestinal, laryngeal, and ovarian cancers; as well as non-malignant lung and pleural disorders. The World Health Organization estimates that 107,000 workers around the world will die every year of an asbestos-related disease, equaling 300 deaths per day.

ADAO’s 11th Annual Asbestos Awareness Conference features more than 40 renowned medical experts and asbestos victims from ten countries, focusing on the latest advancements in asbestos disease prevention, treatment for mesothelioma and other asbestos-caused diseases, and global ban asbestos advocacy. To register for ADAO’s 2015 conference, click here.

About the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was founded by asbestos victims and their families in 2004. ADAO is the largest non-profit in the U.S. dedicated to providing asbestos victims and concerned citizens with a united voice through our education, advocacy, and community initiatives. ADAO seeks to raise public awareness about the dangers of asbestos exposure, advocate for an asbestos ban, and protect asbestos victims’ civil rights. For more information, visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org. ADAO, a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, does not make legal referrals.

Contact:

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO)

Kim Cecchini

Media Relations

202-391-5205


Kim@asbestosdiseaseawareness.org

More – 

ADAO Applauds U.S. Surgeon General for Statement on the Dangers of Asbestos in Support of National Asbestos Awareness …

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) Announces Unity and Remembrance Brunch Sunday, April 19

WASHINGTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), which combines education, advocacy, and community to prevent exposure and ensure justice for asbestos victims, today announced the Unity and Remembrance Brunch to close out its 11th Annual Asbestos Awareness Conference on April 17 – 19, 2015, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, VA.

The brunch, which takes place from 9:30-11:30 am on Sunday, April 19, is an annual tradition for the ADAO community and brings together asbestos victims, loved ones, and supporters with select presentations and musical performances in an intimate setting, culminating with an inspirational candle lighting ceremony. This year’s agenda includes:

  • Opening remarks from Dr. Richard Lemen, ADAO Science Advisory Board Co-Chair
  • Keynote speech from Sue Vento, Widow of the late Congressman Bruce Vento
  • Presentation from Lou Williams, Mesothelioma Warrior; Australian Director, Global Ban Asbestos Network (GBAN); and Social Media Awareness Officer, Asbestos Diseases Foundation of Australia (ADFA)
  • Performance by Jill Cagle, Mesothelioma Widow and Singer
  • Performance of “I’m Not Ready Yet” by Folk Rock Artist, Troi Atkinson
  • Candle Lighting led by Ellen Trunkelrott, ADAO Board Member

“This year’s conference comes on the heels of the introduction of the “The Alan Reinstein and Trevor Schaefer Toxic Chemical Protection Act.” (S. 725) led by Senators Barbara Boxer and Edward Markey” which would ensure the EPA could ban asbestos,” stated Linda Reinstein, President and Co-Founder of ADAO. “Our Unity and Remembrance Brunch is a key example of our continued spirit of hope, and the shared commitment to work towards an asbestos free global community. I am hopeful that one day, the tragedy of asbestos will be a thing of the past, negating the need for such a gathering.”

“The Unity and Remembrance Brunch is important to me – I’m dying of mesothelioma,” said Lou Williams. “If only asbestos had been banned in Australia and around the world when the science confirmed asbestos caused disease and deaths, I might not be suffering today from a preventable and deadly asbestos-caused cancer. But I will not die in vain and remain hopeful that through unity, we will one day see a global ban on asbestos. It is my most important dying wish.”

ADAO’s 11th Annual Asbestos Awareness Conference features more than 40 renowned medical experts and asbestos victims from ten countries, focusing on the latest advancements in asbestos disease prevention, treatment for mesothelioma and other asbestos-caused diseases, and global ban asbestos advocacy. To register for ADAO’s 2015 conference, click here.

Despite its known dangers, asbestos remains legal and lethal in the USA and imports continue. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung, gastrointestinal, laryngeal, and ovarian cancers; as well as non-malignant lung and pleural disorders. The World Health Organization estimates that 107,000 workers around the world will die every year of an asbestos-related disease, equaling 300 deaths per day.

About the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was founded by asbestos victims and their families in 2004. ADAO is the largest non-profit in the U.S. dedicated to providing asbestos victims and concerned citizens with a united voice through our education, advocacy, and community initiatives. ADAO seeks to raise public awareness about the dangers of asbestos exposure, advocate for an asbestos ban, and protect asbestos victims’ civil rights. For more information, visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org. ADAO, a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, does not make legal referrals.

Read this article: 

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) Announces Unity and Remembrance Brunch Sunday, April 19

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) Praises Senate for Passing the Bipartisan 11th Annual "National …

WASHINGTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), which combines education, advocacy, and community to prevent exposure and ensure justice for asbestos victims, today praised the Senate for the passage of a resolution establishing the Eleventh Annual “National Asbestos Awareness Week.” This important educational week raises public awareness about the prevalence of asbestos-related diseases and the dangers of asbestos exposure and coincides with the international educational campaign – Global Asbestos Awareness Week. The Senate Resolution is led by Senator Edward J. Markey (D-MA) and cosponsors – Senators Cory Booker (D-NJ), Barbara Boxer (D-CA), Ben Cardin (D-MD), Mike Crapo (R-ID), Steve Daines (R-MT), Dick Durbin (D-IL), Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), Johnny Isakson (R-GA), Patty Murray (D-WA), Harry Reid (D-NV), Chuck Schumer (D-NY), Jon Tester (D-MT), and Elizabeth Warren (D-MA).

Despite its known dangers, asbestos remains legal and lethal in the USA and imports continue. Exposure to asbestos can cause mesothelioma, lung, gastrointestinal, laryngeal, and ovarian cancers; as well as non-malignant lung and pleural disorders. The World Health Organization estimates that 107,000 workers around the world will die every year of an asbestos-related disease, equaling 300 deaths per day.

Linda Reinstein, President and Co-Founder of ADAO, expressed her gratitude commenting: “On behalf of ADAO, I would like to thank Senator Markey, Co-Sponsors, and full Senate for unanimously passing the 11th Annual ‘National Asbestos Awareness Week’ Resolution. We are extremely pleased to have such strong bipartisan backing of this critical resolution once again so that we can continue our concerted efforts to educate the public on the dangers of asbestos and build a legacy of hope for victims of asbestos each year.” She continued, “Most Americans can’t identify asbestos or manage the risk associated with repairs, renovation, construction, or disasters. The powerful 15 facts outlined in the resolution underscore the dangers of asbestos. Since 1900, the USA has consumed 31 million metric tons of asbestos, which has caused one of the largest man-made disasters. Each year, 10,000 Americans die from preventable asbestos-caused diseases. We are hopeful and encouraged by efforts to reform the outdated Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) from 1976 that has failed to ban asbestos and protect Americans from nearly 84,000 chemicals that have been grandfathered into commerce.”

“My decision to lead the sponsorship of this resolution was an easy one to make as I firmly believe that the key to ending asbestos related deaths is education and prevention and I applaud ADAO for its work to help further this important goal,” stated Senator Edward Markey. “The establishment of the Eleventh Annual Asbestos Awareness Week comes on the heels of my co-introduction, with Senator Barbara Boxer, of another important piece of legislation – the Alan Reinstein and Trevor Schaefer Toxic Chemical Protection Act, S. 725 – which seeks to protect children and communities from the dangers of toxic chemicals and specifically calls for a ban on asbestos. I remain enormously encouraged by the bipartisan efforts taking place to end exposures to toxic substances like asbestos.”

Senator Barbara Boxer said: “Asbestos is one of the most dangerous substances known to humankind – it takes 10,000 lives a year. National Asbestos Awareness Week is an important reminder of why we need to fight to ensure that our families and children are protected from this lethal hazard. That is why Senator Markey and I recently introduced S. 725, the Alan Reinstein and Trevor Schaefer Toxic Chemical Protection Act, which specifically addresses the threat posed by asbestos.”

ADAO has worked with members of the Senate since its founding in 2004 to unanimously pass annual asbestos awareness resolutions and has secured three U.S. Surgeon General asbestos statements in 20092013, and 2014 educating Americans about the dangers of asbestos and steps to prevent exposure. A copy of the resolution can be found here.

ADAO will hold its 11th Annual Asbestos Awareness Conference on April 17 – 19, 2015, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, VA. More than 40 renowned medical experts and asbestos victims from ten countries will speak on the latest advancements in asbestos disease prevention, treatment for mesothelioma and other asbestos-caused diseases, and global ban asbestos advocacy. To register for ADAO’s 2015 conference, click here.

About the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was founded by asbestos victims and their families in 2004. ADAO is the largest non-profit in the U.S. dedicated to providing asbestos victims and concerned citizens with a united voice through our education, advocacy, and community initiatives. ADAO seeks to raise public awareness about the dangers of asbestos exposure, advocate for an asbestos ban, and protect asbestos victims’ civil rights. For more information, visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org. ADAO, a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, does not make legal referrals.

Contact:

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO)

Kim Cecchini

Media Relations

202-391-5205


Kim@asbestosdiseaseawareness.org

This article: 

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) Praises Senate for Passing the Bipartisan 11th Annual "National …

U.S. Legal Support Announced Robert Tooker as Regional Director of Complex Asbestos Litigation

HOUSTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

U.S. Legal Support Inc., a preeminent provider of full-service court reporting, record retrieval, eDiscovery and trial services, announced Robert Tooker as Regional Director of Complex Asbestos Litigation.

Rob Tooker, an expert in complex asbestos litigation, has over 25 years of experience in asbestos matters. He brings to the role years of experience running the boutique court reporting agency Tooker and Antz, focused on asbestos litigation. Tooker provides a strong understanding of the special requirements and characteristics within asbestos litigation.

“Rob brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise as the Regional Director of Complex Asbestos Litigation,“ said Charles F. Schugart, U.S. Legal Support President & CEO. “His client-first focus and expertise make him an ideal fit to lead asbestos litigation at U.S. Legal Support.”

U.S. Legal Support’s reporters, available throughout the United States, have reported over 15,000 asbestos depositions. They are experts in unique asbestos technology, specializing in all matters of asbestos including, mesothelioma, lung cancer, asbestosis, interstitial fibrosis, pleural plaques and wrongful death.

Their service offering includes:

• Video services available throughout the United States

• Day-in-the-life video

• Asbestos calendar team

• Asbestos production team

• Asbestos billing options

• Split billing of originals

• Conference call set-up

• Expert deposition by phone

• Nationwide set-up of large conference rooms

• Asbestos database of over 15,000 transcripts (Available in 2015)

For more information contact Robert Tooker, Regional Director of Complex Asbestos Litigation, at rtooker@uslegalsupport.com.

About U.S. Legal Support

U.S. Legal Support, Inc., founded in 1996, is a privately held company with over 60 offices located across the United States. As one of the leading providers of litigation services, they are the only litigation support company that provides court reporting, record retrieval, eDiscovery and trial services to major corporations and law firms nationwide. www.uslegalsupport.com

Contact:

U.S. Legal Support Inc.

Melissa Delgadillo

800.567.8757


mdelgadillo@uslegalsupport.com

View original post here:

U.S. Legal Support Announced Robert Tooker as Regional Director of Complex Asbestos Litigation

Asbestos at federal building was a surprise to electrician

Ottawa electrician Denis Lapointe says he was exposed to asbestos and other toxins at work for 16 years, and only recently learned the full extent of his potential exposure after filing access to information requests.

The 54-year-old licensed electrician and former public servant had a right to know he was working around hazardous substances.

Now he wonders how many other workers at the Canada Revenue Agency buildings at 875 Heron Rd. may have been inadvertently exposed to asbestos.

Lapointe worked for the CRA from 1992 to 2008 and over that time, the Heron Road taxation facility accommodated thousands of workers.

His job involved drilling and pulling wires through walls, floors and ceilings. He says since he didn’t know he could be disturbing asbestos all those years — his fellow workers wouldn’t have known either.

“I was exposed and I wasn’t properly protected, and here I was walking through this place, using air hoses and whatnot and blowing it to other people, so I have a conscience…That eats me up,” says Lapointe.

Lapointe has obtained documents that show the asbestos contamination was and continues to be present on all floors of the building where he worked. Lapointe says he had to get the reports through access to information requests.

Denis St. Jean, the national health and safety officer for the Public Service Alliance of Canada, says Lapointe should have been informed of the dangers in his workplace.

“Since 1986 the Canada Labour Code applies. There should have been at least some risk assessments on whether or not these buildings have asbestos containing materials … so they can have readily available that information for their workers,” St. Jean says.

A 2014 consultant's report found the CRA building at 875 Heron Rd. would need to remove asbestos containing materials and debris in order to comply with federal regulations. (Julie Ireton/CBC)A 2014 consultant’s report found the CRA building at 875 Heron Rd. would need to remove asbestos containing materials …Poll question

On mobile?Click here to vote on whether employers should have to tell their employees about asbestos or not.

Years of asbestos reports

Decades of asbestos assessment reports for 875 Heron Rd. show contamination in certain areas that would be of concern to tradespeople or maintenance workers.

A consultant’s report from October 2014 reads: “Based on the findings of the reassessment, the facility is not in compliance. In order to bring the subject facility into compliance with applicable regulations, GEC [the consultant] recommends repair and or removal of damaged ACMs [asbestos containing materials] as well as asbestos-containing debris.”

It is not clear what policy or code the building does not comply with.

Public Works and Government Services Canada owns the building.

In a statement, the department says it “proceeds regularly with assessments of all building conditions including asbestos-containing materials. This report pertaining to 875 Heron Rd. is part of our regular due diligence, to ensure that the building conditions comply with all codes and regulations.”

The department says there are only small amounts of asbestos in remote areas of the building. But as a tradesperson, Lapointe assesses it differently.

– DATABASE: 16 carcinogens in Canadian workplaces

“It’s everywhere. It lines all kinds of piping, it lines ventilation piping, it’s in plaster, it’s in grout that finishes the walls, it’s in the cement where you’re chipping, and the tiles. It’s identified everywhere,” he says.

Bob Kingston, a health and safety expert and national president of the Agriculture Union, a component of the country’s biggest public service union, says the federal government is too often allowed to get away with safety breaches.

“In the federal public service they just say we’re working on it and that’s good enough. They come back every year, and as long as they have some report saying they’re working on it everything is fine,” Kingston says.

Lapointe sent for health testing in 1998

For years, Lapointe, a non-smoker, has suffered from poor health and breathing problems, although he has not been diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease. He’s been searching for answers from his former employer – CRA – as well as other departments, including Public Works and Health Canada.

He’s trying to figure out what he was exposed to in the workplace and what could be making him sick. He knows the latency for asbestos-related disease can be 10 to 40 years.

During Lapointe’s sleuthing, he says he discovered correspondence showing his employer knew he’d potentially been exposed to asbestos as far back as 1998, when he and three other electricians were sent for chest X-rays and pulmonary tests.

The letter from CRA to Health Canada reads: “There is a possibility that in performing their duties over the past few years that one or all of them could have been inadvertently exposed to asbestos-containing material.”

Lapointe says he wasn’t told about the potential asbestos exposure. He thought he was tested because of chemical exposure in the building.

Denis Lapointe filed access to information requests to try to find out what he might have been exposed to in the workplace, which may have led to health problems. (Julie Ireton/CBC)Denis Lapointe filed access to information requests to try to find out what he might have been exposed to in the …“What other reason would there have been? I can’t say what I thought then because I really didn’t know. Just the fact I wasn’t being provided [the information] is a pretty good start that I wasn’t supposed to know.”

Lapointe says he was never given the results of those medical tests, but documents he’s received show he was diagnosed with pulmonary restrictions on several occasions. The testing stopped in 2004 without explanation, he says.

“They never told me there was any concerns,” he says.

Labour Canada now investigating

Lapointe’s concerns about the building and his health issues have now led to an investigation by the federal Labour Department.

A health and safety officer is now looking into asbestos, air quality and other potential safety issues. Lapointe and two other workers filed joint grievances detailing their health concerns and took their issues to the Public Service Labour Relations Board.

Occupational health and safety specialist Laura Lozanski says in her experience there’s a lack of enforcement and political will when it comes to protecting workers.

The former nurse who oversees occupational health for the Canadian Association of University Teachers says this case raises serious issues.

“Workers have the right to go into a workplace and expect their workplace to be safe. That’s the law,” she says.

Also Read

More – 

Asbestos at federal building was a surprise to electrician

U.S. Chamber Commends House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Asbestos Trust Transparency Legislation

WASHINGTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

Lisa A. Rickard, president of the U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal
Reform (ILR), made the following statement regarding today’s hearing on
the “Furthering Asbestos Claim Transparency (FACT) Act of 2015” (H.R.
526) in the U.S. House Judiciary Committee. The legislation would
require asbestos personal injury settlement trusts, which currently
operate with little oversight and transparency, to report on their
claims.

“We applaud Representatives Blake Farenthold and Tom Marino for
introducing this legislation, and the House Judiciary Committee for
holding today’s hearing. Abuse of the asbestos compensation system is a
national problem, and the recent indictment in New York with allegations
of kickbacks and self-dealing is just the latest example. Evidence of
plaintiffs’ lawyers manipulating and withholding key information
continues to unfold in the Garlock bankruptcy case, which stands
out as ‘exhibit A’ of the systemic fraud in asbestos litigation.

“Exploitation of the system drains the funds available to deserving
claimants and forces solvent companies, as well as their shareholders
and employees, to pay more than their fair share when claimants ‘double
dip’ in court and in the trust systems. The FACT Act would diminish the
damaging economic ripple effect of these abuses, without impacting
legitimate asbestos claims.”

ILR seeks to promote civil justice reform through legislative,
political, judicial, and educational activities at the national, state,
and local levels.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is the world’s largest business federation
representing the interests of more than 3 million businesses of all
sizes, sectors, and regions, as well as state and local chambers and
industry associations.

www.uschamber.com

         

@USChamber

         

www.freeenterprise.com

Contact:

U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform (ILR)

Justin Hakes, 202-463-3156

Read original article:

U.S. Chamber Commends House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Asbestos Trust Transparency Legislation

>ANSA-ANALISI Fresh hope for families of Eternit asbestos victi

>ANSA-ANALISI Fresh hope for families of Eternit asbestos victi

Former company owner could face charges over 263 asbestos deaths

(ANSA) – Rome, November 20 – Families of victims of deadly
asbestos poisoning took hope Thursday after prosecutors in Turin
completed a homicide probe into former Eternit owner Stephan
Schmidheiny that could see him face charges over 263 deaths,
said ANSA sources.
That came one day after Italy’s highest appeals body, the
Court of Cassation, overturned an 18-year prison sentence
against the Swiss tycoon, whose now-defunct Eternit ran several
asbestos cement plants blamed for more than 2,000 deaths.
Grieving families of victims, outraged over Wednesday’s
supreme court decision, took hope from the Turin case as well as
from government pledges on Thursday to change the statute of
limitations law that led to the annulment of the sole conviction
in the asbestos environmental disaster.
Schmidheiny had been charged with failing to provide
adequate safety measures at the plants, but the high court said
the case had timed out.
Schmidheiny has denied the charges.
In a statement Thursday, the Cassation Court added its
remit was to deal only with the issue of an asbestos
environmental disaster from 1986, the year an Eternit factory
closed, rather than with individual cases of illnesses and
deaths.
The objective “was to ascertain whether or not the disaster
occurred,” the Court said in a note.
Turin prosecutors opened three separate cases related to
the Eternit factories, including one involving murder
allegations against Schmidheiny.
The second case refers to
Italians who died after working in Eternit plants in Switzerland
and Brazil, and the third concerns a major quarry near Turin
that produced asbestos and was connected to Eternit.
Premier Matteo Renzi meanwhile said he would change Italy’s
statute of limitations, a promise supported by leaders of the
Lower House and Senate who said they reached an agreement on the
procedure for moving Renzi’s bill through parliament.
“If a case like Eternit is a timed-out crime, then we have
to change the rules of the game on the statute of limitations,”
Renzi told RTL radio station.
“We can’t have the nightmare of the statute of limitations
(in these cases).
You cannot deprive people of the demand for
justice,” Renzi said.
“I was struck, as an ordinary citizen, by the interviews
with the families (of the victims).
They made me shudder a
little”.
About 150 people belonging to an Eternit victims group
protested Wednesday outside the Cassation Court including many
from Casale Monferrato in Piedmont, and others from different
regions of northern Italy as well as people from Switzerland and
Brazil.
Their leader Romana Blasotti, 85, lost five family members
to asbestos-related diseases, which can often take many years to
appear.
One of the most common diseases, mesothelioma, can take
decades after contamination to make itself known, making
liability hard to prove.
“We want justice, and we believe that we will have it,
after 35 years of struggle,” said Blasotti, whose husband died
in 1983, followed by a sister, a niece, a cousin and a daughter.
“When we started our battle, we knew we had to do it for
our young people…but we did not succeed.
The death rate in
Casale continues at a rate of 50 to 60 deaths per year,” she
said.
Paolo Liedholm of Casale Monferrato, who lost his mother to
asbestos-related illness, was bitter about Wednesday’s decision,
saying people continue to die with no recourse.
“Now we have clearly established this: if you want to kill
someone in Italy the best means is asbestos because it is
legal,” he said.
He added that victims believe the peak in asbestos-related
deaths has not yet occurred because of the time it takes for the
disease to appear.
Asbestos-linked tumours have been reported among Eternit
staff, their families and people living near the factories who
were affected by asbestos dust in the air, while hundreds more
fell ill.
Employees and their families have long claimed that Eternit
did little or nothing to protect its workers and residents
living around its factories from the dangers of asbestos.
The Italian National Magistrates Association (ANM) said
Thursday that it has been calling for Italy’s statute of
limitations laws to be changed for years.
“Magistrates have been raising the problem of the statute
of limitations for years”, Rodolfo Sabelli, president of the ANM
said.

Read this article – 

>ANSA-ANALISI Fresh hope for families of Eternit asbestos victi

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) to Present at American Public Health Association (APHA) 142nd Annual …

LOS ANGELES–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), the largest independent non-profit organization in the U.S. which combines education, advocacy, and community to help ensure justice for asbestos victims; has been selected to present at the American Public Health Association 142nd Annual Meeting and Expo November 15-19 in New Orleans.

APHA’s Annual Meeting & Exposition is where public health professionals convene, learn, network and engage with peers. The annual meeting is focused on strengthening the profession of public health, sharing the latest research and information, promoting best practices and advocating for public health issues and policies grounded in research.

“ADAO is honored to be chosen as a part of the respected community of public health advocates at the 142nd APHA conference,” stated ADAO President and Co-Founder Linda Reinstein. “Although I cannot be there in person due to my participation at the Australian Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency (ASAE) 1st Annual International Conference, I am thankful to my colleague Mark Catlin, for presenting, on our behalf, the important story about the role that asbestos awareness plays in furthering public health.”

On November 17, Mark Catlin, Occupational Health and Safety Director with the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), Washington, DC, will present on behalf of SEIU and ADAO, about the critical role of asbestos disease awareness in promoting and protecting public health. The presentation, titled “History and Impact of Asbestos on OHS in the U.S. and internationally,” will examine how asbestos has caused one of the largest man-made disasters. Between 1900 and 2013, the U.S. consumed 31 million metric tons of asbestos, which has given rise to continued occupational, environmental, and consumer exposure. Globally, an estimated 2 million tons of asbestos is mined each year, and the U.S. continues to import more than 1,000 tons annually. Equally problematic is the long latency period for asbestos disease to present that results in misdiagnosis and under-reporting. More than 50 countries have banned asbestos, but the U.S. has not. The presentation will provide a brief historical overview of the global asbestos crisis, address the inaccuracies in morbidity data, inadequacies in occupational health and safety protections, and regulatory violations. The presentation will also review progress and challenges in asbestos legislation, health education strategies and global advocacy to prevent exposure and to eliminate asbestos-related diseases.

Despite its known dangers, there is still no global ban on asbestos, and it continues to claim lives. Exposure to asbestos, a human carcinogen, can cause mesothelioma, lung, gastrointestinal, laryngeal, and ovarian cancers; as well as non-malignant lung and pleural disorders. The World Health Organization estimates that 107,000 workers around the world will die every year of an asbestos-related disease, equaling 300 deaths per day.

About the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was founded by asbestos victims and their families in 2004. ADAO is the largest non-profit in the U.S. dedicated to providing asbestos victims and concerned citizens with a united voice through our education, advocacy, and community initiatives. ADAO seeks to raise public awareness about the dangers of asbestos exposure, advocate for an asbestos ban, and protect asbestos victims’ civil rights. For more information, visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org.

Contact:

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO)

Kim Cecchini, Media Relations

202-391-5205


Kim@asbestosdiseaseawareness.org

See original article here: 

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) to Present at American Public Health Association (APHA) 142nd Annual …

Principal told to resign over asbestos

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“Chris has been a hard-working and popular principal of Wales Street Primary for the past seven years,” she wrote.

Ms Nagorcka said the school council had been working with the leadership of the school to address health and safety systems since the asbestos incident.

Mr Sexton refused to comment.

More than 500 people signed a petition to Education Department secretary Richard Bolt on change.org calling for the reinstatement of Mr Sexton.

“He is excellent at his job and is much loved by both the children and parents,” says the petition written by Vivian Hardwick.

“The school community has written hundreds of letters to the department requesting that Mr Sexton be reinstated immediately.”

Thirty-nine preps and their teachers were potentially exposed to the deadly asbestos fibres for a week in February.

An independent report provided to the department in April said it had “significant concerns about the works undertaken by the school and their subsequent response”.

It said an asbestos audit should have been completed before the renovation began, the school’s asbestos register and risk-management plan appeared to be substantially out of date and the classroom was reopened before appropriate clearance had been given.

“In our opinion the school should not have allowed this classroom to be used once potential concerns were raised.”

Parent Michael Sullivan said he was disappointed Mr Sexton would not return.

“There was an expectation that Chris would be back next year – we didn’t think it would come to this,” Mr Sullivan said.

“I do not believe he was solely responsible. Fundamentally the school loses twice. We’ve had the disappointment of the incident occurring in the first place and then the loss of a principal who has done an exceptional job in seven years at the school.

“I don’t see that is in the interest of parents and particularly children.”

Australian Education Union state president Meredith Peace said it would have been a difficult decision for Mr Sexton to resign.

“We have supported him throughout what’s been a pretty long and difficult process and we will continue to support him,” Ms Peace said.

“We remain very concerned that a significant responsibility such as asbestos is left up to school principals to manage. Asbestos is an incredibly dangerous substance and requires significant expertise which our principals don’t have. While they continue to be expected to do this we will continue to get incidents like this occurring.”

Ms Peace questioned what had been done to put in place a long-term plan for the removal of asbestos from school buildings.

Ms Nagorcka said the principal role would be advertised with a view to the person beginning in term one next year.

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Principal told to resign over asbestos

ADAO Hosts “Jammin’ for Asbestos Awareness” Concert with the Bob Rahe Family, Featuring Renowned National and Local …

LOS ANGELES–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), the largest independent non-profit organization in the U.S. which combines education, advocacy, and community to help ensure justice for asbestos victims; today announced the “Jammin’ for Asbestos Awareness” Concert September 26 in Omaha, Nebraska. Hosted in conjunction with the Bob Rahe Family, the event features top national and local performers who are joining together to celebrate the life of asbestos victims.

The concert, which coincides with National Mesothelioma Awareness Day, was inspired by the memory of Bob Rahe, who lost his battle to mesothelioma. ADAO is sponsoring the concert to further its efforts as the leader in building asbestos awareness communities in the fight against asbestos.

“As the only organization dedicated to combining education, advocacy, and community through a truly global, volunteer-driven effort, ADAO is excited to support the Jammin’ for Asbestos Awareness Concert as another great example of how we can all come together to fight deadly asbestos diseases,” stated ADAO Co-Founder and President Linda Reinstein. “We owe our sincere thanks to our volunteers, interns, supporters, donors, patients and their families, LeadershipScience Advisory Board, and our National Spokesperson Jordan Zevon, who will be featured at the event. Our network includes over 20,000 individuals eager to live in a world without asbestos; we expresses our sincere gratitude to the Bob Rahe Family for being a part of this network, and organizing this event in memory of Bob.”

“The Bob Rahe Family supports the efforts of ADAO in all respects,” stated the family spokesperson for the event. “Bob Rahe was a father, brother, and uncle who came into contact with asbestos during a summer job. We had no idea that over 30 years later, he would be diagnosed with a deadly cancer relating to this exposure. Many people are unaware that the U.S. continues to import asbestos into our country, and that we are still utilizing products that contain this poisonous hazard. We are organizing this event to promote education and awareness. Maybe, one day, with all of us armed with much more knowledge than we had yesterday, we can look towards a cure.”

The concert will take place at 7 pm on September 26 at the Slowdown, located at 729 North 14th Street in Omaha; doors open at 6 pm. Interested parties can purchase tickets online or at the door for $20 each. The first 50 ticket holders to enter the Slowdown will receive a free event t-shirt.

PERFORMERS:

Local Bands:
The Jiggawatts, CleverLumpy GravyMandown, and Cosmic Radio

National Singers/Musicians:
Jordan Zevon, ADAO National Spokesperson
Troi Atkinson, Mesothelioma Patient

Despite its known dangers, there is still no global ban on asbestos, and it continues to claim lives. Exposure to asbestos, a human carcinogen, can cause mesothelioma, lung, gastrointestinal, laryngeal, and ovarian cancers; as well as non-malignant lung and pleural disorders. The World Health Organization estimates that 107,000 workers around the world will die every year of an asbestos-related disease, equaling 300 deaths per day.

About the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was founded by asbestos victims and their families in 2004. ADAO is the largest non-profit in the U.S. dedicated to providing asbestos victims and concerned citizens with a united voice through our education, advocacy, and community initiatives. ADAO seeks to raise public awareness about the dangers of asbestos exposure, advocate for an asbestos ban, and protect asbestos victims’ civil rights. For more information, visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org.

Contact:

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO)

Kim Cecchini, 202-391-5205

Media Relations


Kim@asbestosdiseaseawareness.org

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ADAO Hosts “Jammin’ for Asbestos Awareness” Concert with the Bob Rahe Family, Featuring Renowned National and Local …