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August 21, 2018

Woman whose cancer was linked to asbestos died of ‘natural causes’

Woman whose cancer was linked to asbestos died of ‘natural causes’

Woman whose cancer was linked to asbestos died of ‘natural causes’

Woman whose cancer was linked to asbestos died of ‘natural causes’



First published


A WOMAN who suffered from cancer strongly linked to asbestos died despite avoiding exposure to it, an inquest heard.

Janet Binding, of Durland Close, New Milton, died on November 4 after contracting mesothelioma, a lung cancer usually caused by asbestos exposure. The 72-year-old had no occupational or family links to the substance, her husband Peter told the Winchester inquest.

She was admitted to Oakhaven Hospice in Lymington on October 15, Dr Frank McGinn said in a statement and died on November 4.

Senior central Hampshire coroner Grahame Short said there have been cases of “spontaneous” contraction of the disease and recorded a verdict of death by natural causes.

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Woman whose cancer was linked to asbestos died of ‘natural causes’

Dock worker died after asbestos exposure

Dock worker Edgar Wardrop died after asbestos exposure

Southampton General Hospital

Southampton General Hospital



First published


A FORMER Southampton dock worker died after unloading asbestos from boats for over 20 years, an inquest heard.

Edgar Wardrop, of Bullar Street, died on September 4 at Southampton General Hospital after being diagnosed with mesothelioma the previous year.

Senior coroner for Southampton and the New Forest, Grahame Short, heard how the 73-year-old stevedore unloaded hessian bags filled with asbestos from boats that had travelled from the Cape of Good Hope.

Dr Sanjay Jogai, a consultant pathologist at Southampton General Hospital, said Mr Wardrop had a severe tumour which was a direct result of asbestos exposure.

Recording a verdict of death due to industrial disease, Mr Short said: “Given the very clear diagnoses and the correlation and the asbestos exposure, taking that with his work history and employment where asbestos was present, and he was working in close proximity to it, I find on balance of probability that he breathed in this and he died from asbestos.”

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Dock worker died after asbestos exposure

Waste including suspected asbestos dumped in Nelson

Waste including suspected asbestos dumped in Nelson

Waste including suspected asbestos dumped in Nelson

Waste including suspected asbestos dumped in Nelson



First published


A THREE foot high mound of asbestos has been dumped in a Nelson street.

Residents are concerned about the dangerous substance, which a wagon tipped into Bank House Road on Wednesday, especially as there are families living nearby and a nursery.

Residents in Leeds Road say that Bank House Road, at the back of their street, has been plagued with fly tippers for years after the council knocked down the houses there.

Only a couple of houses in Bank House Road remain occupied but the surrounding streets are lived-in and despite numerous complaints to the council, residents say the problem is getting worse.

Six council workers in white protective suits attended the scene on Thursday afternoon and put a cover over the asbestos and brought a huge skip, but as yet, it has not been removed.

One resident in Leeds Road said: “This street has just been left derelict after they pulled the houses down and rubbish is being dumped here all the time. The state of it is awful. There’s grates falling down and holes all over the road. It’s awful.

“But when a wagon showed up and just tipped a load of asbestos in the road, I just couldn’t believe it. It’s getting ridiculous and I’ve complained about it a number of times.”

“It’s a massive pile of asbestos. The winds are blowing and Bradley Nursery is just there to the side of it. Who knows the damage it could cause.”

Pendle Council said that they did not know who was responsible for dumping the asbestos there but that they would return to the street to remove it completely as soon as possible.

Bradley ward councillor, Mohammed Iqbal said: “Dumping asbestos here is just despicable. There’s a lot of children in that area and a nursery school nearby and it could be dangerous.

“There is an issue in that street with fly tipping and an issue with the road itself. I am meeting on site next week with the county council to ensure that something is done about it.

“In the meantime, the council need to get the asbestos removed immediately and find out who was responsible.”

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Waste including suspected asbestos dumped in Nelson

Asbestos gave railway worker cancer, inquest hears

Asbestos gave Eastleigh railway worker cancer, inquest hears

Asbestos gave railway worker cancer, inquest hears

Asbestos gave railway worker cancer, inquest hears



First published




Hampshire Chronicle: Photograph of the Author

by

AN Eastleigh man who worked for 40 years at the town’s railway works died of cancer caused by prolonged exposure to asbestos, an inquest heard.

Eric Williams, 73, was employed at the works from 1956 to 1995 and was constantly exposed to the deadly dust which when inhaled can cause mesothelioma decades later.

He joined as apprentice aged 15 and worked his way up to chief foreman.

In a statement made shortly before his death in August, Mr Williams, of Passfield Avenue, said in the 1950s the carriages used to be sprayed with asbestos at night: “The asbestos hanged in the air. It was clearly visible. The asbestos dust and debris we gathered and recycled it as a filler and plugs.

In the 1960s Mr Williams renovated carriages: “A huge amount of dust was created. Asbestos was allowed to fall to the floor. I was showered in the face with asbestos dust. It created dust hanging in the air like mist.

“At no time was I ever warned about the dangers of being exposed to asbestos. No protection was provided, not even a mask.”

Senior Coroner Grahame Short at an inquest in Winchester ruled that the death from mesothelioma was caused by industrial disease.

Mr Short added: “Far too many men working in the carriage works have died as a result of this particular cancer.”

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Asbestos gave railway worker cancer, inquest hears

Solicitor's asbestos warning after death of pensioner

Solicitor’s asbestos warning after death of pensioner

York Press: Ray Brown died from the lung condition malignant mesothelioma

Ray Brown died from the lung condition malignant mesothelioma

A SOLICITOR has warned that asbestos disease does not have a ‘sell-by date’ after an inquest heard how an 86-year-old York man had become its latest victim.

Howard Bonnett, of Corries Solicitors, said that in recent times, he had been dealing with many more case of men and women in their 80s who were suffering the asbestos-related cancer mesothelioma.

He said York Acting Coroner Jonathan Leach had recorded at an inquest that Raymond Brown, of Rawcliffe, had died because of the cancer.

“The inquest heard evidence that Mr Brown had been exposed to asbestos in the 1960s and 1970s during his work as a pump engineer on large scale industrial projects including various power stations and factories,” he said.

“Mr Brown developed problems with breathing in February and following investigations he was diagnosed with mesothelioma in March, and succumbed to the disease at York Hospital on April 5. He leaves a wife Margaret and children Christine and David.”

He said Mr Brown’s death was another sad tale of mesothelioma affecting an otherwise normal man.

“At 86, he rightfully thought he had missed this sad scourge which has affected too many people in the York area. I am sorry to say that asbestos disease does not have a “sell by “ date.

“Raymond’s death shows that if you have been exposed to asbestos then you have the risk of diseases like mesothelioma for the rest of your days.”

Mrs Brown said the family had known for many years that Raymond had developed asbestos damage to his lungs.

“We had hoped that he would not be another sad statistic of this awful disease,” she said.

“For many years, he suffered with ill health and we wish he had been around to have fought this disease and to have seen justice done.

“We hope other asbestos victims and their families keep an eye out on their health and make sure they get an early diagnosis and get the best treatment that they can “

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Solicitor's asbestos warning after death of pensioner

Asbestos removal part of demolition

Asbestos removal part of demolition – Uintah Basin Media: News

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Asbestos removal part of demolition

Asbestos caused death of former carriageworks employee

Asbestos caused death of former carriageworks employee

York Press: Asbestos caused death of former carriageworks employee

Asbestos caused death of former carriageworks employee

A retired electrical technician has died as a result of inhaling asbestos during 15 years’ working at York Carriageworks, an inquest has heard.

In a statement to his solicitors before his death, Derek Wilson, 65, described how blue and white asbestos was thrown into the air by work on carriages at the British Rail Engineering plant on Holgate Road where he worked from 1973 to 1988.

He got so dirty from the dust, he needed to wash at the end of his shift.

The inquest at New Earswick Folk Hall heard that Mr Wilson, of Bellhouse Way, Foxwood, died at St Leonard’s Hospice, York, on March 29, 2014.

A post mortem revealed he had asbestos fibres in his body and had died from malignant mesothelioma, a form of cancer commonly caused by asbestos which is recognised as an industrial disease. He had been diagnosed as having the disease more than a year earlier.

York coroner Donald Coverdale concluded he had died from an industrial disease and that the mesothelioma had been caused by inhaling asbestos dust during his work at the carriageworks.

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Asbestos caused death of former carriageworks employee

Asbestos support group

Asbestos support group

Daily Echo: Asbestos support group

Asbestos support group

Hampshire Asbestos Support Group (HASG) holds its next meeting on Thursday, February 14, in St Mark’s Church, Archers Road, Southampton. It is open to anyone with asbestos-related illnesses or their families, carers and friends.

See hasag.co.uk or call 023 8001 0015.

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Asbestos support group

Exposure to asbestos led to man's death

Exposure to asbestos led to man’s death

Dorset Echo: Exposure to asbestos led to man's death

Exposure to asbestos led to man’s death

YEARS of exposure to asbestos led to the death of a West Dorset man, a coroner has ruled.

John Robert Jarvis, of Glebe Court, Beaminster, died after inhaling the toxic fibres during several years of working in maintenance, an inquest at County Hall heard.

Mr Jarvis, aged 81, was diagnosed with plural plaques a few years ago and began legal proceedings against two companies he had worked for.

After his death last December, a post mortem revealed he had malignant mesothelioma, which is a cancer caused most commonly by exposure to asbestos.

For some part of his employment, Mr Jarvis was required to crawl through manholes lined with asbestos, the inquest heard.

He had made a statement in legal proceedings saying he was never provided with protective equipment and no risk assessments were ever carried out.

He added: “We simply weren’t told about the risks.”

Recording a verdict that Mr Jarvis died of an industrial disease, coroner for Dorset Sheriff Payne said people suffering from asbestos-related diseases often don’t know ‘for tens of years’ after they have finished being exposed to it.

He added: “I am satisfied that Mr Jarvis has died as a result of exposure to asbestos.”

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Exposure to asbestos led to man's death

Large payout for asbestos victim

Large payout for asbestos victim, from Hockley, who worked at Shoebury MOD site

By Michelle Archard

Echo: Large payout for asbestos victim

Large payout for asbestos victim

AN ELECTRICIAN suffering from terminal cancer has won a six-figure payout after being exposed to deadly asbestos during his work at the military base in Shoebury.

The 64-year old from Hockley, who does not want to be named, was diagnosed with mesothelioma in April 2012 after suffering from pain in his ribs, a persistent cough and breathlessness.

He underwent treatment at St Bartholomew’s Hospital in London, but has since been given the devastating news the cancer has spread to his brain.

The father-of-two was exposed to asbestos while working at the Ministry of Defence’s Shoebury munitions testing site, for his employer the Ministry of Public Buildings and Works, now the Department for Communities and Local Government, between 1965 and 1970.

Lawyers at Irwin Mitchell in London negotiated an undisclosed six-figure sum for him which will help cover the cost of care when his condition deteriorates and further limits his independence.

He says it feels “like some justice has been done”.

His job involved drilling holes in walls and ceilings which were clad with asbestos in workshops and research units.

He said: “After drilling holes in walls and ceilings, I had to sweep up the dust and debris the work had created. I was an apprentice.

“We didn’t really think anything of breathing in the dust as we worked because we were never told of the dangers or given any safety gear to wear.

“During my apprenticeship, I worked in various buildings on the Shoebury site. I did electrical work as part of the refurbishment of buildings. When we were doing refurbishments all of the trades were working together and I believe I was exposed to asbestos dust from colleagues lagging pipes near me.”

The man began feeling unwell in February 2012 and was diagnosed with mesothelioma two months later following tests and scans.

He added: “It was devastating to find out that asbestos exposure had given me cancer and that my symptoms will get worse.

“My illness is terminal so it’s heartbreaking for my family, and now it has spread to my brain.

“We are all anxious about what the future holds, but I amgrateful to have the support around me from my loved ones.

“The settlement will be a big help financially when it comes to my care and will help support my family to look after me and help me to battle on against this incurable disease.

“It feels like justice has been done as my former employer should have done something to protect me and my colleagues.”

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Large payout for asbestos victim