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July 17, 2018

OC School Closed For Asbestos Removal Reopens

Huntington Beach, CA –

(FOX 11) After months of asbestos cleanup hundreds of students are returning to a Huntington Beach School Tuesday. Oak View Elementary, which closed in the fall, is welcoming back its second through fifth graders.

RELATED: Students From 2 OC Elementaries Return To Class On Other Campuses, Asbestos Cleanup Continues

RELATED:11 OC Elementary Schools Remain Closed After Asbestos Testing, Students Displaced
RELATED:Displaced Asbestos Students

Kindergarteners will continue to study at Pleasant View Preschool and first graders will stay at Sun View Elementary for the rest of the school year.

The returning students will study in portable classrooms on the campus until the asbestos cleanup has been finished in the main building.

Asbestos concerns prompted the closure of this school, plus two others in the district, after traces of asbestos were found in classrooms and abated asbestos was found in ceiling tiles.

In a recent meeting, parents shared their concerns about the portable classrooms; asking if they were at risk of containing asbestos. The also wondered where their kids food would be prepared, but for the most part many are happy to have their kids coming back.

The cleanup process is ongoing and Ocean View School District is still coming up with a plan for abatement which will be voted on by the school board.

Hope View And Lake View elementary schools are still closed.

This process is expected to cost the district between $7 to 11 Million dollars.

Kindergarteners will continue to study at Pleasant View Preschool and first graders will stay at Sun View Elementary for the rest of the school year.

The returning students will study in portable classrooms on the campus until the asbestos cleanup has been finished in the main building.

Asbestos concerns prompted the closure of this school, plus two others in the district, after traces of asbestos were found in classrooms and abated asbestos was found in ceiling tiles.

In a recent meeting, parents shared their concerns about the portable classrooms; asking if they were at risk of containing asbestos. The also wondered where their kids food would be prepared, but for the most part many are happy to have their kids coming back.

The cleanup process is ongoing and Ocean View School District is still coming up with a plan for abatement which will be voted on by the school board.

Hope View And Lake View elementary schools are still closed.

This process is expected to cost the district between $7 to 11 Million dollars.

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OC School Closed For Asbestos Removal Reopens

State-only asbestos labelling 'unfair', say principals

State-only asbestos labelling ‘unfair’, say school principals

EducationVictoria

Date

Benjamin Preiss

EDUCATION. GENERICS OF SCHOOL AND EDUCATION, KEY WORDS, KIDS, CHILDREN, LEARNING, CLASS, TEACH, HOLIDAYS, UNIFORM, PRIMARY SCHOOL, FUTURE.  EDUCATION; PHOTO PAUL JONES; AFR/FBM; 080512. SPECIALX 00084649

Schools found to contain the substance must post signs at their entrances saying an ‘induction’ must be completed before any workis done on the school site. Photo: Paul Jones

Principals are concerned that asbestos warning signs are worrying parents and damaging the perception of state schools because their Catholic and independent counterparts are exempt from posting them.

So far 318 state schools have been audited and labelled this year.

Victorian Principals Association president Gabrielle Leigh said she was concerned parents might mistakenly believe only state school buildings contained asbestos. ”It could be any schools but government schools are being told they have to put the signs up,” she said. Ms Leigh said she’d heard reports of parents avoiding some schools because they thought them unsafe.

Schools found to contain the substance must post signs at their entrances saying an ”induction” must be completed before any workis done on the school site.

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State-only asbestos labelling 'unfair', say principals

Hinsdale Middle School cleaning up mold, asbestos


The clean-up at the Hinsdale Middle School now includes mold and asbestos. The school has been closed and students are attending classes at Clarendon Hills Middle School.

It’s a race against the clock as workers try to clean up mold and asbestos in time for them to reopen early next week.

It’s passing period for Hinsdale Middle School students, only it’s not their school. They are using the classrooms at Clarendon Hills Middle School while workers continue to clean mold discovered in their own building. That means a split schedule at the school as students from both schools share one building.

“It’s been as good as it can be, you know. My kids go to school from 12 to 4:30 now. Is it ideal? No, but it is what it is,” said Susan Draddy, Hinsdale parent.

It also means a long line of cars outside the school as Hinsdale parents drop their kids for the noon start time. The shortened school day means 4 1/2 hours of school and no lunch time, at least until workers finish at Hinsdale.

“The contractors we’re working with are telling us that they should have the building ready on Saturday morning and then we’ll do additional air testing before we bring the students and staff back into the building,” said Dr. Renee Schuster, superintendent, District 181.

The superintendent says the best case scenario would have Hinsdale students back in their own building by early next week. Many parents are hoping that is the case.

“I’ve heard possibly February 3rd, which is Monday, so I’m praying for that,” said Vonnise Hussey, Hinsdale parent.

If not, administrators are looking at possible long-term solutions, including using classroom space at National Louis University in Lisle. It’s an idea many parents oppose.

“Being bused an hour a day for these kids is not really an option,” said Corey Huth, Hinsdale parent.

The superintendent has been providing daily updates to parents. She says they hope to get air quality tests back as early as Sunday evening, but they won’t be able to give much notice to students and parents as to how soon they’ll be able to reopen the school.

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Hinsdale Middle School cleaning up mold, asbestos

Asbestos cleanup sparks concern at Cole Harbour school

Two parents whose children attend a Cole Harbour elementary school say they’re concerned that they weren’t notified of an asbestos removal operation at the school over the Christmas holidays.

Laurie and Tyler Berdan learned of the asbestos cleanup at Colonel John Stuart Elementary School while walking their dog with their kids on the property over the holidays. Tyler noticed some trucks doing work on the school and spotted a sign on the door indicating that asbestos was being removed.

Laurie said she contacted the school board once classes were back in session and was told parents weren’t informed because there was no health risk.

“Well, I guess we differ in that opinion,” she said Wednesday. “We’re talking about asbestos. Yes, there is a health risk. It’s pretty well-documented.”

Asbestos, a construction material frequently found in older buildings, can cause cancer or scarring of the lungs when inhaled in large quantities. The federal government’s guidelines on asbestos say it does not pose a significant health risk when it is enclosed in a product and is not disturbed.

Laurie said she’s confident that the school and school board have taken all the appropriate steps to ensure the safety of the students and staff. But she said parents should have been notified of the operation.

“I’m sure they wouldn’t have the kids at the school if the air quality tests didn’t come back within the realm (of safety),” she said. “I’m absolutely positive that they’ve done everything correct. But I also think that we kind of have the right to know.”

After learning about the asbestos removal, the parents were left with unanswered questions.

“When was it found? How was it found? Was it disturbed? How much of it was there?” Laurie asked. “Parents should have the right to assess any sort of health risk.”

Tyler said there was no effort to inform anybody, “regardless of whether the risk was higher or lower or virtually non-existent.”

Doug Hadley, the spokesman for the Halifax regional school board, said ceiling tiles were removed from most of the school over the holidays in preparation for a lighting retrofit planned for this month.

“It was recognized that the ceiling tiles, because of their age, would have contained asbestos,” he said. “It actually was a proactive measure. There was not any immediate concern.”

Hadley said that due to their age, about 75 per cent of schools in the board’s jurisdiction may have asbestos. But he emphasized that as long as the material isn’t disturbed, there is no risk to health or safety.

Although the board doesn’t have a policy on informing parents of asbestos removal, Hadley said after the Berdans’ complaint, parents at Colonel John Stuart Elementary School will be notified about the recent work.

“Typically, we would not inform parents of that type of removal because it only takes place during times when no students or staff are in the building,” he said. “If it had occurred during a time when the building was going to be occupied, we would have made that notification.”

But since more schools may be facing similar work in the future, the board will consider notifying parents at those schools, too.

“It gives us some thought that maybe, just to be on the proactive side of things, that we let parents know what the scope of the work is before it happens.”

Hadley said tests conducted at Colonel John Stuart Elementary School showed acceptable air quality.

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Asbestos cleanup sparks concern at Cole Harbour school

Asbestos at Montague High demolition prompts precautions

Asbestos in the old Montague High School building has prompted special precautions to be taken as demolition work begins.

The province has confirmed asbestos in floor tiles, wall plaster and pipe insulation in sections of the school built in the 1960s.

Actual removal of the asbestos will begin in a week or 10 days. But first the contractor must get approval of its work plan from the province, detailing exactly how it intends to get the job done.

The province has hired an environmental company to ensure the contractor adheres to all safety guidelines.

Workers have already sealed off some areas inside the school that contain asbestos.

Once the Worker’s Compensation Board and the province give approval, crews will remove materials containing asbestos, bag it, and truck it away to certified disposal sites.

Tyler Richardson, manager of building design and construction for the province, said officials will also be closely monitoring the situation.

“There are very stringent protocols for removing asbestos. Of course asbestos is not dangerous unless you disturb it. So we know of the protocols. We have to set up containment areas where the asbestos is located. We actually create zones where we make areas and put them under negative pressure with filtering systems and everybody has to have proper attire on, respirators etcetera,” he said.

“We are very much aware that protocols have to be followed, given the fact that we have residents and the school operating close by.”

The demolition site is located next to the intermediate school.

Despite close monitoring, some residents feel uneasy about the work being done in the centre of town.

“I think it’s dangerous for the junior high right beside it, for the kids who come outside at lunchtime or at break time,” said April MacDonald.

The province says the only disruption to the nearby school or residents may be some excessive noise.

But that’s common in any demolition project, not just those involving asbestos.

Inspectors can order the work stopped if they find problems.

The contract to do the demolition work was awarded to the lowest bidder, A & L Concrete Forming Limited of Halifax.

Richardson hopes the $340,000 demolition project will be complete by Dec. 20.

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Asbestos at Montague High demolition prompts precautions

Asbestos removal underway at some Guilford County Schools

GUILFORD COUNTY, N.C.– A handful of Guilford County schools are part of an extensive asbestos removal project this summer.

“We have approximately 91 schools that contain asbestos in some form or another,” explained GCS Project Manager Ernest King.

King says they are working to remove asbestos from 30 schools this summer. He hopes the rest of schools can be complete on weekends during the school year or next summer when kids are out for break.

“All the kids, teachers, whoever is there we want to make sure that they’re safe,” he said.

King explained unexposed asbestos is not hazardous for people in the schools day-to day. However, when tiles or carpets are disturbed during demolition or renovations, asbestos fibers can be released into the air.

“During the process and after it’s over, we have air monitoring where a third-party company comes in to check the air,” King added.

Principal Mark Harris works at Peeler Open Elementary School and is excited to have new carpeting in the office, media center and computer lab.

“Peeler’s an open school so here, kids lay on the carpet and read, they move around, it’s not like a traditional school where folks just sit in rows,” Harris said.

GCS says there are 91 schools and 11 administrative buildings containing asbestos, mostly in floor tiles and carpeting.

“If you’re gonna have asbestos in a building, floor tile is where you prefer to have because it’s a low content of asbestos. Normally ranges from 1-2%,” explained King.

“We are thankful to have this done,” added Harris.

Schools involved in the asbestos removal project this summer:

  • Academy at Central
  • Alderman Elementary
  • Allen Jay Elementary
  • Allen Middle
  • Bluford Elementary
  • Brooks Global Studies
  • Colfax Elementary
  • Cone Elementary
  • Frazier Elementary
  • Guilford Middle
  • High Point Central High
  • Hunter Elementary
  • Kiser Middle
  • Jamestown Elementary
  • Johnson Street Global Studies K-8 Magnet
  • Joyner Elementary
  • Madison Elementary
  • Millis Road Elementary
  • Murphey Traditional Academy
  • Nathanael Greene
  • Northeast Middle
  • Peeler Elementary
  • Pleasant Garden Elementary
  • Sedgefield Elementary
  • Shadybrook Elementary
  • Southwest Middle
  • Sternberger Elementary
  • Sumner Elementary
  • Twilight Academy
  • Welborn Middle

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Asbestos removal underway at some Guilford County Schools