March 20, 2018

Family of asbestos victim exposed at Glasgow carpet factory appeal to former colleagues for help

Frances Hamilton was 75 when she died in May 2014, not long after being diagnosed with mesothelioma. The incurable disease is a form of cancer which attacks the lining of the lungs, caused by inhaling asbestos dust and fibres decades ago.

Before her death, Ms Hamilton told lawyers acting in her case that she believed she was exposed to the deadly substance while working at the Templeton carpet factory in Bridgeton, Glasgow, from the late 1950s to the mid-60s. The factory, then run by James Templeton and Company, had been built 1892 and was at one time the largest carpet manufacturer in the world.

She later worked with her mother, who also died of mesothelioma, at Wrights Insulation in 1967 where were exposed to asbestos while sewing boiler covers for steam locomotive engines.

Her son, Mark MacLellan, 48, has instructed specialist asbestos-related disease lawyers at Irwin Mitchell Scotland to investigate the conditions that his mother was exposed to and what measures, if any, were put in place to prevent workers being exposed to asbestos.

Ms Hamilton told her family she worked in an “extremely dusty” environment and was provided with no overalls or gloves to protect her from coming into contact with the hazardous substance.

Laura McCallum, a specialist asbestos lawyer at the Glasgow legal firm, said: “Mesothelioma is an extremely aggressive disease and causes a great deal of pain and suffering for victims like Frances.

“Employers knew the risks of asbestos when she began working in the 1950s and should have provided her with protection to prevent exposure to the dust.

“We would like to hear from employees who worked at the Templeton carpet factory and mill between 1955 and 1975 on the working conditions that they were exposed to and what protective equipment, if any, was provided by their employers.

“This information will be crucial in helping Frances’ family secure justice for their mother and grandmother and we hope anyone who worked with Frances will come forward with the information we need to ensure those responsible for her exposure to asbestos are held to account.”

Another former employee, Helen Winning, who worked at the factory from 1964 until the early 1980s, was diagnosed with mesothelioma in 2006. Her mother, who had been a weaver at Templetons, also died from mesothelioma in 1994.

The factory, which overlooks Glasgow Green and the People’s Palace, was designed by the Scottish architect, William Leiper, and inspired by the medieval Palazzo Ducale in Venice.

It was blighted by tragedy soon after opening when a factory wall collapsed during high winds in 1889, trapping 100 women in the weaving workshop and killing 29.

A fire the following year claimed more lives.

In 1981, James Templeton and Co. merged with A F Stoddard and Henry Widnell & Stewart to form Elderslie-based Stoddard Carpets, which eventually went bust in 2005. The former factory has now been converted into flats and is also home to the West Brewery.

However, the lawyers believe they would be able to sue the factory’s former insurers, which provided cover to the factory from 1950 to 1970.

Payouts could also be sought against the former insurers of Wrights Insulation, which is also defunct.

Mr MacLellan, who lives in Barry, Vale of Glamorgan, said: “My mother was devastated when she lost her mum to mesothelioma, so for her to suffer from the same disease was absolutely devastating.

“To find out the disease was caused by her exposure to asbestos simply by going to work every day is even more upsetting for the family.”

Anyone with information about working conditions at the Templeton carpet factory should contact Laura McCallum at Irwin Mitchell Scotland on 0141 300 4083.

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Family of asbestos victim exposed at Glasgow carpet factory appeal to former colleagues for help

School assistant appeals to former colleagues in asbestos investigation

School assistant appeals to former colleagues in asbestos investigation

The Northern Echo: INFORMATION APPEAL: Catherine Robson


A FORMER school assistant diagnosed with a terminal asbestos-related cancer is appealing to former colleagues to help an investigation into her exposure.

Catherine Robson, 59, from Sacriston, County Durham, was diagnosed last Christmas with mesothelioma, a cancer of the lining of the lungs caused by asbestos exposure.

She has now instructed lawyers at Irwin Mitchell to investigate.

Mrs Robson worked at Bullion Lane Primary School, Chester-le-Street, from September 1990 to July 1991 and again from November 1994 to March 2008.

Mrs Robson, then known as Catherine Foster, recalls parts of the school were later found to have asbestos in it.

She also believes she may have been exposed to asbestos while helping with her father’s dusty work overalls.

Her dad, Arthur Carter, worked for Elliott Bros Limited at ICI Billingham between October 1965 and February 1966 and for Steel and Co Limited from March 1966 to May 1975. Sadly, he died from lung cancer in 2001.

She said: “I used to do everything I could to help my mum and used to help wash my dad’s boiler suits from work which were always covered in dust which I now believe may have been asbestos dust.

“The course of my illness has been horrendous. Before, I was such an active person and enjoyed walking and going to the gym but I’m now in pain and undergoing chemotherapy.

“It’s really hard for my husband, Harry, and I as we have only been married for five-and-a-half years and I thought we would have a long future together.”

Anyone with information should call Isobel Lovett or Emma Tordoff at Irwin Mitchell on 0191 279 0104.

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School assistant appeals to former colleagues in asbestos investigation