_ap_ufes{"success":true,"siteUrl":"friableasbestos.com","urls":{"Home":"http://friableasbestos.com","Category":"http://friableasbestos.com/category/current-asbestos-news/","Archive":"http://friableasbestos.com/2015/04/","Post":"http://friableasbestos.com/asbestos-firms-ready-to-fight-silvers-slanted-legal-system/","Page":"http://friableasbestos.com/effect-asbestos-mesothelioma/","Nav_menu_item":"http://friableasbestos.com/69/"}}_ap_ufee

February 21, 2018

Protect yourself from asbestos with the proper training

Updates: The ACT government has recently passed new laws relating to dealing with asbestos.

Updates: The ACT government has recently passed new laws relating to dealing with asbestos. Photo: Virginia Star

The ACT government has recently passed new laws when dealing with asbestos that will take effect from January 1, 2015. The new laws will include new regulations and two codes of practice developed by Safe Work Australia.

The key changes in the regulations remove the old rule where anyone could remove bonded asbestos if the area was less than 10 square metres. After January 1, 2015, the removal of bonded asbestos will now have to be carried out by a licensed asbestos removalist.

The only exemption to the above requirement is when the work is minor or routine maintenance. An example may be if asbestos sheeting is fixed to a wall in a bathroom or laundry and an electrician is putting in a new powerpoint.

I expect the penalties will be significant if you are found working with and removing asbestos. These laws and fines will also apply to home handymen and do-it-yourself builders and renovators.

Advertisement

Worksafe ACT will be releasing further details to both industry and the public shortly.

The new laws will change the licensing requirements for asbestos assessors and removalists by lifting the qualifications and training required to conduct the above type of work.

Another component of the amended regulations clears up some terminology and clearly replaces old terms such as a ‘competent person’ with ‘licensed asbestos assessor’. Also, some additional signage will be required when renovating a building when asbestos is present.

My message to everyone, especially DIY renovators, is please get some asbestos-awareness training. It is a risk not worth taking for the well-being of you, your family and friends. Once the fibres enter your lungs it can’t be reversed, so eliminate the risk.

The Housing Industry Association runs asbestos awareness training for industry and the public. They only take four hours and are a valuable piece of knowledge for anyone who likes doing their own repairs. Once armed with this training you will have the knowledge to identify where asbestos could be present and then engage a qualified asbestos assessor to carry out an assessment.

If asbestos is present get it removed by a qualified asbestos removalist. Spend the money and have asbestos removed and disposed of properly.

For example, asbestos can be present in many forms. It is often in putty that was used to hold in panes of glass in old timber windows and doors. Just by chiselling out old putty could release asbestos fibres. Get trained.

Neil Evans is the Housing Industry Association’s ACT and southern NSW executive director

Excerpt from:  

Protect yourself from asbestos with the proper training

Old asbestos dump sites may be a sleeper issue

Old asbestos dump sites may be a sleeper issue

NSW

Date

Natalie O’Brien

Dr Peggy Trompf, occupational hygienist and director of Industrial Health Matters.

Dr Peggy Trompf, occupational hygienist and director of Industrial Health Matters. Photo: Janie Barrett

Old forgotten asbestos dump sites may be the “sleeper issue” for future generations, says Peggy Trompf, a Sydney occupational hygienist experienced in dealing with contaminated sites and buildings.

Dr Trompf, the director of Industrial Health Matters, warns it is an issue that needs to be addressed, especially with the popularity of urban renewal projects and the development of housing projects on former industrial sites.

“This is going to be a health and safety issue for the future,” says Dr Trompf, who has consulted on many large sites.

“New housing estates and apartment blocks are being built on ground where asbestos and other metals might be broken up, and even buried in the ground.

Advertisement

See the article here – 

Old asbestos dump sites may be a sleeper issue

Asbestos homes built as experiments in 1970s

Asbestos homes built as experiments in 1970s

ACT NewsReal Estate News

Date

An ACT government spokeswoman confirmed the government was aware of the homes which were built as part of the NCDC Government Housing Construction Program in the 1970s.

An ACT government spokeswoman confirmed the government was aware of the homes which were built as part of the NCDC Government Housing Construction Program in the 1970s.

The National Capital Development Commission exhibited the six experimental modular houses as part of a push towards alternative housing construction in the 1970s.

The Kambah homes were exhibited for public display in May 1975 and then were allocated to public housing tenants.

A brochure from the time about the new houses says the homes have clear contemporary lines with flat roofs and floor to ceiling windows, white walls and in contrast, brightly coloured front doors.

The design of the houses ensures that they will be cool in summer and in winter, once heated, will retain warmth because of their insulated walls and ceilings.

Advertisement

View this article: 

Asbestos homes built as experiments in 1970s

Asbestos claims rising but James Hardie doubles profit

Costly to settle: Asbestos-related claims are rising for James Hardie, particularly in relation to mesothelioma.

Costly to settle: Asbestos-related claims are rising for James Hardie, particularly in relation to mesothelioma. Photo: Sylvia Liber

James Hardie says it is seeing an increase in the number of asbestos claims relating to mesothelioma, the deadly cancer caused by prolonged exposure to the substance.

The construction firm, which revealed it had doubled its first-half profit on Thursday, said the number of asbestos claims relating to the cancer had risen above the company’s expectations.

In half-yearly statements released to the stock exchange on Thursday, Hardie said the average cost of asbestos claims for the six months to September was higher than the previous year due to an increase in mesothelioma claims, which were more costly to settle.

“We have seen some concerning trends in mesothelioma claims, which we have highlighted previously,” chief financial officer Russell Chenu said.

Advertisement

“We’ve now got a better handle on the ‘what’ and the ‘how’, but what we still don’t understand is the ‘why’.

“There’s still a lot of work going on in that space, but there is a definite trend in an increase in mesothelioma claims that the fund is experiencing.”

James Hardie’s payments for asbestos claims are tied to its cashflow. It pays up to 35 per cent of its annual net operating cash flow to an asbestos fund.

The company said the number of mesothelioma claims could be higher than its predictions due to the way it calculates a peak year of claims.

It forecast mesothelioma claims to peak in 2010-11, but said that, had it forecast a peak to occur later – for example, in 2015-16 – the estimates could change significantly.

“Mesothelioma is the most expensive of the asbestos disease types in terms of compensation,” Mr Chenu said.

“The fund is seeing an increase in the inflow of claims, and almost all of the increase in claims appears to be mesothelioma disease, rather than the other types of disease.

“That’s increasing the amount of payments relative to both last year and relative to an actuarial assessment that was done at March 2013.”

Mr Chenu said he could not say more on the topic because it was a matter for the fund and “as far as I’m aware, we don’t fully understand the cause of the increase in claims as of yet”.

James Hardie shares soared 14 per cent on Thursday morning after the company revealed it had doubled its operating profit in the first half of the financial year.

The company, which reports in US dollars, said its operating profit for the six months to September 30 was $US108.3 million ($116.4 million), up from $US56.3 million a year earlier.

The profit figure excludes asbestos, regulatory and liability adjustments, it said. Without stripping these out, its profit was higher at $US194.1 million.

Chief executive Louis Gries said the second quarter had benefited from an increase in sales in its US business, which reflected an improvement in the housing market relative to last year.

“Last year, we invested significantly in organisational capability in expectation of market growth in the US,” he said.

“This year we are benefiting from that investment, as evidenced by improved earnings before interest and tax margins.”

The company’s results benefited from the recent fall in the Australian dollar, which reduced its liability for asbestos claims in US dollar terms.

See original: 

Asbestos claims rising but James Hardie doubles profit

Asbestos risk in buildings

Ageing buildings containing potentially deadly asbestos in remote Kimberley communities are jeopardising the health of residents and threaten to cost taxpayers millions of dollars in remediation.

Aboriginal community leaders and council bosses fear this is the tip of the iceberg with up to 100 houses and structures standing disused or badly neglected throughout the region.

Most were built by contractors from the 1940s to late 1980s.

The Department of Aboriginal Affairs was last week forced to fence off a large dilapidated shed containing asbestos near a school at Beagle Bay, about 100km north of Broome.

Just days later, the Shire of Derby West Kimberley labelled an old community building containing asbestos a health hazard that should be razed in Bayulu, 10km south of Fitzroy Crossing.

“The building has incurred a significant amount of damage and therefore asbestos has become friable, giving the asbestos fibres potential to become airborne,” Shire of Derby/West Kimberley manager of development services Melanie Houghton advised Fitzroy Valley Futures Housing.

“The issue requires immediate attention and resolution as it poses a significant health risk to the public.”

Bayulu Community Council was so concerned it sent a letter countersigned by all eight members to local area co-ordinator Nick Devereaux pleading for something to be done.

They said the building was not only an occupational health and safety hazard but also a fire risk, located right next door to the community supermarket.

Shire president Elsia Archer said she was horrified when told children were seen playing inside when Ms Houghton carried out her inspection.

“It concerns me that a lot of these buildings in remote Kimberley communities contain asbestos and have reached a stage in their lives where they pose a health risk but nobody wants to take responsibility,” she said.

“The frustrating thing is we as a council don’t have the right to do anything, which is a shame because I believe this is just the tip of the iceberg.”

Many of the communities fall under the Aboriginal Lands Trust, which is administered by the Department of Aboriginal Affairs.

Djarindjin Aboriginal Corporation chief executive Gus Tampalini said it was believed three houses contained asbestos in his 300-strong community, about 180km north of Broome.

He said two were being demolished on the assumption they contained asbestos and material from the store keeper’s residence had been sent to Adelaide for testing and results were pending.

“I would suggest there would be up to 100 houses and buildings that contain asbestos in remote Aboriginal communities,” he said.

“If you have got 100 houses (containing asbestos), you are well and truly in the millions of dollars to fix the problem.”

Mr Tampalini said the potential remediation costs were forcing an “out of sight, out of mind” attitude from State and Federal governments.

“You get a kid playing in these areas that gets an asbestos-based disease by the time they are 30, it is pretty serious stuff,” he said.

The Department of Aboriginal Affairs said the building in Bayulu has now been fenced off, signs are in place and children have been advised of the risk.

“A call for quotes has been distributed to relevant contractors and remediation work will commence as soon as possible,” a DAA spokesman said.

Visit site: 

Asbestos risk in buildings

Asbestos removal

It has been revealed plans to make Tasmania asbestos-free could cost the State Government more than $1 billion.

There is a national push to ensure all public buildings are asbestos-free by 2030.

The head of Tasmania’s Workplace Safety watchdog says it could cost taxpayers $1.4 billion.

Roy Ormerod told a Senate inquiry that Housing Tasmania estimates it will need to spend $400 million, the Education Department between $200 million and $1 billion and the Health Department $7 million.

“At the end of the day you’ve really got to get this stuff out of these buildings,” Mr Ormerod said.

Last month the Workplace Relations Minister David O’Byrne said the Government was still trying to work out the cost of the plan.

The Local Government Association has warned councils will not have the money to carry out the plan over the next 17 years.

Meanwhile Tasmania’s Chamber of Commerce and Industry says the proposal is unsafe and unreasonable.

Spokesman Phil Bayley says forcing businesses to comply with the proposed deadline could lead to money being diverted away from other safety initiatives.

He has told ABC Local Radio, Tasmanian businesses that have an asbestos problem are already doing a good job of managing the risk.

“The deadline’s not helpful, because what it does is it actually imposes an arbitrary deadline that doesn’t actually count for what the best management practices are on any given worksite and it’s also uncosted,” Mr Bayley said.

“And as I said it actually diverts money from higher priority occupational health and safety initiatives.”

See original – 

Asbestos removal

High cost of asbestos removal

It has been revealed plans to make Tasmania asbestos-free could cost the State Government more than $1 billion.

There is a national push to ensure all public buildings are asbestos-free by 2030.

The head of Tasmania’s Workplace Safety watchdog says it could cost taxpayers $1.4 billion.

Roy Ormerod told a Senate inquiry that Housing Tasmania estimates it will need to spend $400 million, the Education Department between $200 million and $1 billion and the Health Department $7 million.

“At the end of the day you’ve really got to get this stuff out of these buildings,” Mr Ormerod said.

Last month the Workplace Relations Minister David O’Byrne said the Government was still trying to work out the cost of the plan.

The Local Government Association has warned councils will not have the money to carry out the plan over the next 17 years.

Meanwhile Tasmania’s Chamber of Commerce and Industry says the proposal is unsafe and unreasonable.

Spokesman Phil Bayley says forcing businesses to comply with the proposed deadline could lead to money being diverted away from other safety initiatives.

He has told ABC Local Radio, Tasmanian businesses that have an asbestos problem are already doing a good job of managing the risk.

“The deadline’s not helpful, because what it does is it actually imposes an arbitrary deadline that doesn’t actually count for what the best management practices are on any given worksite and it’s also uncosted,” Mr Bayley said.

“And as I said it actually diverts money from higher priority occupational health and safety initiatives.”

Visit site: 

High cost of asbestos removal