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January 16, 2018

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization Thanks 2014 Sponsors, Donors, and Volunteers Who Led a Year of Change

LOS ANGELES–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), the largest independent non-profit organization in the U.S. which combines education, advocacy, and community to protect public health and asbestos victims’ civil rights recognizes Sponsors, Donors, and Volunteers who were instrumental in the 2014 ADAO year of impact. As the organization plans for its 2015 conference, leadership takes a moment to specifically call out the names of those who have been so pivotal to this year’s success.

“Sometimes it’s hard to believe we’re coming up on our Eleventh Annual International Asbestos Awareness Conference, Where Knowledge and Action Unite, which will be held April 17-19, 2015 in Washington, DC,” stated ADAO President, Linda Reinstein. “We’ve accomplished so much in the first ten years since ADAO was founded in 2004. We’ve welcomed more than 150 conference speakers from across the globe, presented in 19 countries, and built a network of more than 40,000. We offer a heartfelt thanks to the sponsors of our previous conferences and take this opportunity to particularly thank our 2014 donors and sponsors, who helped us take asbestos awareness to new levels of success. We excitedly look at collaborative efforts that work to end the tragedies associated with this lethal mineral.”

ADAO recognizes its 2014 Sponsors and Donors:

2014 Sponsors

Platinum Sponsors

Silver Sponsor

  • Early, Lucarelli, Sweeney and Meisenkothen, LLC

2014 Donors

Alton Miles for Meso Event
Diamond Donor

  • Emily Bankhead

Emerald Donors

  • Tom O’Neil Memorial Donations from Family and Friends
  • Tom’s Friends at the Antelope Club in Clearwater Florida
  • The Trafton and Maude Crandall Foundation
  • The Von St. James Family
  • Jill Cagle

Sapphire Donors

  • Marli Beer
  • Michele Mikulic

Garnet Donors

  • Esther O’Driscoll
  • Paul & Yvonne Hall

About the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was founded by asbestos victims and their families in 2004. ADAO is the largest non-profit in the U.S. dedicated to providing asbestos victims and concerned citizens with a united voice through our education, advocacy, and community initiatives. ADAO seeks to raise public awareness about the dangers of asbestos exposure, advocate for an asbestos ban, and protect asbestos victims’ civil rights. For more information, visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org.

Contact:

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO)

Kim Cecchini

Media Relations

202-391-5205


Kim@asbestosdiseaseawareness.org

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Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization Thanks 2014 Sponsors, Donors, and Volunteers Who Led a Year of Change

Italy court annuls conviction for Swiss billionaire in asbestos scandal

ROME (Reuters) – Italy’s top court has overturned an 18-year jail sentence for a Swiss billionaire convicted over his role in the country’s biggest asbestos scandal, saying too much time had passed since the alleged wrongdoing.

Stephan Schmidheiny was found guilty in 2012 of negligence at his company’s Italian factories in the 1970s and 80s, which eventually led to almost 3,000 asbestos-related deaths.

However, in a ruling that stunned relatives of the dead, Italy’s highest court annulled the verdict late on Wednesday, saying the statute of limitations had kicked in.

The decision means that the Swiss businessman will also escape having to pay millions of euros in fines and compensation ordered by Italian courts in 2012 and 2013.

Prosecutors in the original trial said Schmidheiny had not taken sufficient measures to protect the health of workers and nearby residents from the asbestos used at the Italian plants of his building material firm Eternit.

The factories had used asbestos in the production of cement. The plants closed in 1986, but workers and local residents continue to suffer the consequences, with Italy’s biggest union saying that the latest victim of an asbestos-related disease was only buried on Saturday.

Prime Minister Matteo Renzi said the ruling underscored the need to reform Italy’s notoriously snail-paced judicial system. “We need to ensure that trials take less time, and change the statute of limitations,” he told RTL 102.5 radio on Thursday.

Schmidheiny had been accused of causing an environmental disaster — a charge which expires under Italy’s statute of limitations. Prosecutors said they were now reviewing other possible legal avenues to bring the case back to court.

Schmidheiny’s spokesman called for all legal proceedings to be halted, saying the company had already paid “many tens of millions of euros” in compensation to the victims since 2008.

The company said Schmidheiny had never played an operational role in the management of its Italian activities and said it had only been the major shareholder in the Eternit unit for 10 out of its 80-year history.

According to prosecutors, Eternit’s products were used to pave streets and used as roof insulation around its plants in northern and southern Italy, resulting in years of exposure for the unsuspecting local population.

Asbestos became popular from the late 19th century onwards as a way to reinforce cement. But research later revealed that the inhalation of asbestos fibres can cause lung inflammation and cancer. It is now banned in much of the world.

(Reporting by Isla Binnie; Editing by Crispian Balmer)

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Italy court annuls conviction for Swiss billionaire in asbestos scandal

U.S. judge strikes sealing order over Garlock asbestos liability

By Jessica Dye

July 24 (Reuters) – A North Carolina federal judge has struck down a bankruptcy court ruling that sealed evidence and testimony about gasket maker Garlock Sealing Technologies’ liability for asbestos injuries, saying no compelling reason was stated to close the proceedings.

The “public and press have a co-extensive right to view and consider documents tendered” in court, wrote U.S. District Judge Max Cogburn in the Western District of North Carolina in Wednesday’s ruling.

Cogburn reversed the sealing order and sent it back to the bankruptcy court for further consideration.

Garlock, a subsidiary of EnPro Industries Inc, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in June 2010 as it faced personal injury claims related to its asbestos-lined gaskets used in pipes, valves and other industrial applications.

Last year, U.S. Judge George Hodges in the Western District of North Carolina bankruptcy court presided over a trial to determine how much Garlock should set aside to cover claims for mesothelioma, a cancer caused by asbestos exposure.

Lawyers for plaintiffs, who say they were exposed to asbestos from Garlock products, argued the figure should be over $1 billion. But Garlock said its liability was much lower and that that estimate was based on past settlements that were inflated by manipulated evidence and fraud, according to court filings.

Legal Newsline, an online publication owned by the U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform, filed a motion to make all the bankruptcy proceedings public, but Hodges denied it, saying certain matters discussed were confidential.

In January, Hodges ruled that Garlock should only have to pay $125 million for asbestos claims. He also slammed plaintiffs’ lawyers for withholding evidence in previous cases, “infect(ing) fatally the settlement process and historic data.”

After the trial, several companies, including Ford Motor Co and Honeywell International Inc, joined an appeal by Legal Newsline to the North Carolina district court to get the evidence unsealed.

Ford and Honeywell have also been sued over asbestos exposure and were co-defendants in some cases against Garlock.

“We’re optimistic that the evidence will ultimately be disclosed and that people can form their own opinions,” said Steven Pflaum, a lawyer for Legal Newsline.

Harold Kim, executive vice president of the U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform, called the decision an important step toward bringing greater transparency to asbestos litigation.

EnPro spokesman Dan Grgurich said the company was “pleased that the judge agrees that the public has a right to access evidence developed in our case.”

Lawyers for Garlock asbestos claimants did not immediately return requests for comment.

The case is Legal Newsline v. Garlock Sealing Technologies, U.S. District Court for the Western District of North Carolina, No. 13-464.

(Reporting by Jessica Dye; Editing by Ted Botha and Richard Chang)

Source:

U.S. judge strikes sealing order over Garlock asbestos liability

Parts of US Capitol closed after asbestos accident

WASHINGTON (AP) — An accident involving asbestos work forced a temporary closure of the House side of the Capitol on Thursday and prompted House leaders to delay the day’s session for two hours.

No injuries were reported. The incident occurred around 2:30 a.m. or 3 a.m., Capitol Police said.

A handful of workers were removing insulation containing asbestos from around pipes and valves on the building’s fourth floor, above a staircase, said a congressional official who was not authorized to discuss the matter by name and spoke on condition of anonymity.

On-site samples and another sample analyzed by an outside lab revealed low enough asbestos levels that officials decided the building was safe to reopen, the official said. Those samples revealed levels similar to what is found in typical buildings in Washington, said the official, who did not provide any figures.

By midmorning, most of the building had reopened and Capitol tours on the House side had resumed. The Senate, at the other end of the 751-foot-long building, seemed unaffected by the incident.

The East Grand Staircase, which runs from the first floor to the third floor inside the House side of the building, was blocked off and more than a dozen workers and officials spent much of the day examining the area. Also closed was the Thomas P. O’Neill Jr. Room, a third-floor room near that staircase that was named for the late speaker and Massachusetts Democrat.

The House began the day’s session at noon instead of 10 a.m. because of “an industrial accident,” according to a statement from House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio. Even so, by midmorning a handful of tourists was sitting in the visitors’ gallery, observing an otherwise empty chamber.

The Senate began its session as scheduled at 10 a.m.

The office of the architect of the Capitol said in a statement that engineers and certified industrial hygienists had decided the building was safe to reopen and that the staircase would remain closed indefinitely.

Construction of the main, center section of the Capitol began in 1793 and was finished in 1826.

As the country grew and more lawmakers joined Congress, a south wing for the current House chamber and a north wing for the Senate were built. Both were completed in 1868, along with a new, larger dome.

The architect’s office has been repairing decaying plaster throughout the building. It has also started preparations for a project to repair the 8.9 million pound, cast iron dome.

___

Associated Press writer Donna Cassata contributed to this report.

Originally from – 

Parts of US Capitol closed after asbestos accident

House side of Capitol reopens after asbestos incident

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House side of Capitol reopens after asbestos incident

Asbestos turns library into white elephant

The facility turned into a white elephant in 2003 after the Department of Buildings and Engineering Services (DBES) found that the roofing had asbestos, which posed a health hazard to employees and users.”The building has been non-operational because it is worn out, and the asbestos roof poses a health hazard. The building is awaiting renovation so that it can be used as the Gaborone Public Library,” BNLS deputy director Gaorere Kgotla said.

Responding to a questionnaire sent a month ago, BNLS said the Ministry of Youth, Sport and Culture, under which public libraries fall, and relevant stakeholders are working on documentation for a tender for Expression of Interest (EOI), through which the most qualifying specialist will be engaged for the removal and disposal of the fibrous material. The concerned departments are Waste Management and Pollution Control, the Environmental Health Division and the Environmental Health Division of the Gaborone City Council.

Kgotla emphasized the need for due care when removing and disposing of the material because it may cause serious health complications to the occupants in the surrounding areas. The library was opened in the 1970s. At the time, it served as a public library, head-office and national reference library. In 1978, the Gaborone public library relocated to the Gaborone City Council premises.

The BNLS could not disclose the cost of building this library opting to state that it was built through a donor agency, neither could they estimate the cost of renovating it. “We are however not in a position to disclose the estimated costs as the technical unit is still preparing the tender documentation which includes project estimates,” Kgotla said. The BNLS says the facility was used for the provision of reading material for the National Reference Library and as an administration block for corporate services and the bibliographic support services division.

Excerpt from:

Asbestos turns library into white elephant