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May 20, 2018

Asbestos warning after fly-tipping on beauty spot

Warnings signs had been placed on Surrey Wildlife Common after material containing asbestos which can lead to cancer was dumped there

Material containing asbestos has been dumped near to a Guildford pond on Surrey Wildlife Common.

Guildford Borough Council is investigating the issue, and believes it could have been left along Keen’s Lane on Chitty’s Common in Worplesdon on Sunday July 28 or Monday July 29.

The bags were left around one metre away from the pond at the Surrey Wildlife Trust common, and yellow tape warning of asbestos had been put around them, before it was removed this week.

Exposure to asbestos can lead to cancer and scarring of the lungs.

It is safe if undamaged or undisturbed, but needs to be disposed of correctly.

A spokesman for the borough council said they were looking for any information relating to suspicious vehicle movements seen in the area around Sunday July 28 and Monday July 29.

“We are aware of the issue and it has been passed onto our specialist contractors to deal with,” the spokesman said.

“In this case it was reported to us on Tuesday July 29 so probably appeared either on Sunday night or some time on Monday.

“There is very little indication as to where this came from and who left it there.”

Surrey Wildlife Trust said it was also aware of the asbestos, and warned of the dangers of fly-tipping in general.

“Asbestos fibres are so small that they cannot be seen by the naked eye or even by normal household microscopes, but when asbestos is dumped and released into the environment it contaminates the air, where it can be inhaled, water, where it can be ingested, and soil,” a spokesman for the trust said.

“Asbestos dust can easily travel for long distances in the air before it settles into water or on top of soil, thus contaminating areas far away from its source.

“The small asbestos fibres remain intact in air, water and soil. It does not break down or biodegrade.

“The fibres do not absorb into the soil and instead sit on top of the soil, where it can easily be disturbed and redistributed into the air, which will have an impact on native flora.

“It can also settle on the surface of the soil instead of getting absorbed into the ground, which means that it can still get picked up by the wind and inhaled into human lungs, which pose the biggest risks.

“Fly-tipping can be harmful to wildlife and the environment, as animals can get stuck inside discarded waste, and chemicals in items such as paint, battery acid and pesticide and leach into the ground and waterways.

“It can crush wild flowers and may introduce non-native species that may take over the natural environment,” the spokesman said.

“Even the most innocent dumping of a few grass clippings encourages others to do the same.

“This can result in household refuse also being dumped.”

Up until February this year, there had been more than 5,600 incidents of fly-tipping reported in Guildford in the previous five years.

Asbestos must be removed by a licensed company, and in Guildford some types can be disposed of at the Guildford Community Recycling Centre at Slyfield Industrial Estate.

For anyone who finds fly-tipping or suspects waste to contain asbestos, the advice is to notify the local authority, which can be contacted by calling 01483 505050.

Originally posted here – 

Asbestos warning after fly-tipping on beauty spot

Council to give asbestos DIY advice


Council to give asbestos DIY advice


LOIS CAIRNS

Last updated 05:00 04/08/2014

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Do-it-yourself homeowners will be targeted by a new campaign aimed at encouraging the safe removal of building materials containing asbestos.

Christchurch City Council inspections and enforcement unit manager Anne Columbus said that in the past authorities had been reluctant to provide information to homeowners on how to safely remove asbestos because they did not want to encourage them to remove it themselves, but this was happening anyway because it was expensive to get professionals to remove it.

The joint agency Waste and Environmental Management Team (Wemt) set up to manage the mountain of waste generated by the quakes had now decided to change tack and were in the process of pulling together information for homeowners on how they could manage their own asbestos removal.

“The message now is if you are going to do it, do it the right way and do the right thing,” Columbus told the council’s environment committee.

She said a new dedicated website would go live where DIY people would be able to get detailed advice on how to remove asbestos safely and how to dispose of it. It was part of a new community education campaign supported by Worksafe New Zealand and the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority.

Cr David East said the problem was not just disposing of asbestos in building materials, but also disposing of soil contaminated with asbestos.

On the former Queen Elizabeth II site, for example, there were three or four large piles of asbestos-contaminated soil. Although it technically posed little risk to the community, there was a perception among nearby residents that it could pose a health hazard.

“What is the longer-term strategy for getting rid of contaminated soil? There must be thousands of cubic metres of it?” East said.

Environment Canterbury programme manager Don Chittock acknowledged the disposal of contaminated soil was an issue and said solutions were being sought.

“We have a meeting tomorrow with Transwaste [which operates the Kate Valley landfill] to discuss disposal options . . . we’re working with the industry to provide solutions,” Chittock said.

The environment committee decided to ask for more information on the removal and disposal of asbestos-contaminated soil. It also voted unanimously to ask the council to write to the minister of building innovation and employment in support of a ban on the importation of materials containing asbestos.


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Council to give asbestos DIY advice

Council to give DIY advice on 'safe' home asbestos removal


Council to give asbestos DIY advice


LOIS CAIRNS

Last updated 05:00 04/08/2014

Relevant offers


The Rebuild

Council to give asbestos DIY advice

Learning to play game of claims

‘Not about looks’ for Hottest Tradie

Up to 3000 EQC claims to wait until next year

House builders warned of shoddy work

Wards go up at new Burwood campus

Canterbury the house-building capital

New product launches at trade-only event

Rebuild inspiration from around the world

Opinions divided on blueprint success

Do-it-yourself homeowners will be targeted by a new campaign aimed at encouraging the safe removal of building materials containing asbestos.

Christchurch City Council inspections and enforcement unit manager Anne Columbus said that in the past authorities had been reluctant to provide information to homeowners on how to safely remove asbestos because they did not want to encourage them to remove it themselves, but this was happening anyway because it was expensive to get professionals to remove it.

The joint agency Waste and Environmental Management Team (Wemt) set up to manage the mountain of waste generated by the quakes had now decided to change tack and were in the process of pulling together information for homeowners on how they could manage their own asbestos removal.

“The message now is if you are going to do it, do it the right way and do the right thing,” Columbus told the council’s environment committee.

She said a new dedicated website would go live where DIY people would be able to get detailed advice on how to remove asbestos safely and how to dispose of it. It was part of a new community education campaign supported by Worksafe New Zealand and the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority.

Cr David East said the problem was not just disposing of asbestos in building materials, but also disposing of soil contaminated with asbestos.

On the former Queen Elizabeth II site, for example, there were three or four large piles of asbestos-contaminated soil. Although it technically posed little risk to the community, there was a perception among nearby residents that it could pose a health hazard.

“What is the longer-term strategy for getting rid of contaminated soil? There must be thousands of cubic metres of it?” East said.

Environment Canterbury programme manager Don Chittock acknowledged the disposal of contaminated soil was an issue and said solutions were being sought.

“We have a meeting tomorrow with Transwaste [which operates the Kate Valley landfill] to discuss disposal options . . . we’re working with the industry to provide solutions,” Chittock said.

The environment committee decided to ask for more information on the removal and disposal of asbestos-contaminated soil. It also voted unanimously to ask the council to write to the minister of building innovation and employment in support of a ban on the importation of materials containing asbestos.


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Council to give DIY advice on 'safe' home asbestos removal

Asbestos exposure in schools case sees cancer sufferer paid £275,000 by Devon County Council

Chris Wallace

Chris Wallace was awarded an out of court settlement by Devon County Council after claiming he developed cancer after being exposed to asbestos in school in South Molton in the 1990s and 1980s.


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A “UNIQUE case” where a man claimed he was exposed to asbestos as a schoolboy in South Molton and developed cancer has seen a £275,000 payout by Devon County Council.

Between 1982 and 1993 Chris Wallace went to Yeo Valley Primary School, Yeo Valley Junior School, South Molton JuniorSchool and South Molton Community College.

The 36-year-old was diagnosed with asbestos-related terminal cancer of an organ lining at the age of 30.

Known as peritoneal mesothelioma, this form of cancer grows in tissues covering the abdomen and can lie dormant for up to 40 years.

Related content

Mr Wallace’s claim was settled by the council just weeks before the case went to court and it awarded him the money without admitting liability.

Mr Wallace, who has since moved to Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, took great care in recollecting times of when he may have come into contact with asbestos during school.He collated examples ahead of the case, which will now not be heard.

Mr Wallace was reported as saying: “It was a very difficult case, having to prove you were there and that you were exposed to a certain level.

“The council has to take a large chunk of responsibility. They know it’s in the building and children are at risk of getting to it.

“It’s down to them to ensure it’s removed safely.”

Devon County Council said this was the first case of a former pupil taking such legal action.

A spokesman for Devon County Council said: “This is a unique case and the only time a former Devon school pupil has taken legal action in these circumstances.

“We obviously have every sympathy with Mr Wallace for his illness. But it is important to point out that the case was settled out of court without any admission of liability from Devon County Council.

““Devon County Council takes great care to manage asbestos in its buildings and that includes regular inspections. Asbestos is safe as long as it isn’t disturbed.

“All Devon schools have been surveyed for asbestos and each school holds a full record of any asbestos in its buildings.

“This identifies where asbestos is located, its condition and our safety policies. Contractors are also required to sign the asbestos list on any visit which has the potential to disturb the asbestos.

“Schools have their own Asbestos Management Plans which detail their local arrangements, including communication between the school, parents and staff.”

Read this article:

Asbestos exposure in schools case sees cancer sufferer paid £275,000 by Devon County Council

Bridges must act to ban importation of asbestos



Bridges must act to ban importation of asbestos

Bridges must act to ban importation of asbestos


The
CTU is calling on Minister Simon Bridges to act on the eve
of Mesothelioma* Day (*Mesothelioma is a cancer caused by
exposure to asbestos fibres).

“Today in
Parliament, MP Andrew Little tabled an asbestos containing
product which was able to be easily purchased over the
counter from a retail store. Minister Bridges commented that
“The Ministry for the Environment is doing an inventory”
of asbestos containing products – but we don’t need a
list – we need a ban!” CTU President, Helen Kelly
said.

“Minister Bridges can and should act to ban
the importation of this deadly substance – our nation’s
biggest workplace killer with an estimated 170 deaths
annually and that this will rise to over 300 as the results
of the ‘asbestos boom’ of the 1970s take their toll –
the same as the road toll. Workers are being exposed to a
deadly substance and paying the ultimate price. This is
unacceptable.” Kelly said.
“There is an easy fix.
Today in Parliament Minister Bridges said that “this is a
complex matter… we have a sufficient regime currently in
place”. We do not accept this, and the hundreds of people
who are signing our petition calling on a ban on asbestos
containing products agree.” Kelly said.

ENDS

© Scoop Media


Budget Docs: More Asset Sale Slush Fund Spending Revealed

Rather than paying down National’s record $60 billion debt as promised, Budget documents reveal the asset sale money is still being used as a Government slush fund, Labour’s State-Owned Enterprises spokesperson Clayton Cosgrove says…

“The Government conveniently neglected to identify these items in the May Budget documents.” More>>

ALSO:

Read this article: 

Bridges must act to ban importation of asbestos

Asbestos policy up for comment

Dubbo City Council has put a draft policy for dealing with deadly substance asbestos on exhibition for public comment.

The document specifies the organisation’s responsibilities to minimise exposure to residents, the public and council employees and has some information for “DIY” enthusiasts.

Asbestos is found in most homes built before the mid-1980s and can cause deadly cancers if the fibres become airborne and are inhaled.

Council environmental control manager Debbie Archer said council has a dual role in minimising exposure to asbestos as far as reasonably practical for residents and the public as well as council’s employees.

“The draft asbestos policy outlines the role of council and other organisations in managing asbestos, the relevant regulatory powers as well as general advice for residents on renovating homes that may contain asbestos,” Ms Archer said.

“There are five key areas of responsibility for council in relation to minimising risk of asbestos exposure – educating residents, managing land, managing waste, regulator responsibilities, and responsibility to workers.

The manager said health risks related to asbestos were low if it were left undisturbed, but the risk rose when undertaking home renovations or demolition work, particular in buildings constructed before 1990.

“It is important to remain vigilant when dealing with potentially hazardous material and the draft policy clearly articulates council’s responsibilities,” Ms Archer said.

In 2012 then-local government minister Don Page said there had already been at least 4700 deaths from mesothelioma, a type of cancer associated with exposure to asbestos, in Australia since records began in the early 1980s, with more than 25,000 more expected to die from it over the next 40 years. The draft asbestos policy can be downloaded from the council website www.dubbo.nsw.gov.au and public submissions close on June 9.

Jump to original – 

Asbestos policy up for comment

Asbestos removal firm fined £109,000

View original – 

Asbestos removal firm fined £109,000

Children exposed to asbestos

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Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union organiser Mansour Razaghi said he became alarmed after seeing workers without complete asbestos protective gear working in close proximity to passing school children.

”The kids were just one or two metres away from the excavation machine and from where a worker was hand-picking the asbestos fragments from the soil,” he said.

The site also lacked appropriate fencing, public warning signs about asbestos and decontamination for trucks and workers leaving the site, Mr Razaghi said.

However, Cr Mehajer accused ”a third party” of planting some of the potentially deadly material in a bid to discredit him.

Cr Mehajer said long-buried asbestos had been found but later questioned the quantity, professing to be ”familiar with every soil grain” at the John Street address.

”For me to come across contaminated soil with asbestos really does raise concerns to who trespasses my site after hours and dumps such hazardous material to target me,” Cr Mehajer said in an email.

Asked who he thought was behind such a plot, Cr Mehajer responded: ”Maybe you?”

But another Auburn councillor, Tony Oldfield, dismissed Cr Mehajer’s suspicions as ”a really stupid comment”.

”The reason we found out about asbestos was by accident,” said Cr Oldfield. ”The complaints from local residents were actually about the dust coming from the site.”

Mr Razaghi claims asbestos sheeting was also being removed from an adjoining Ann Street property owned by Cr Mehajer and damaged by fire.

Work has resumed at the site this week.

A Department of Education and Communities spokesman said Lidcombe Public School had been unaware of the asbestos exposure when contacted by Fairfax Media this week.

But Cr Mehajer denied that there had been any safety breaches by his company, Sydney Project Group, or its subcontractor, pointing to an air-monitoring report that found calculated concentrations of asbestos fibres to be less than the reporting limit of 0.01 fibres/mL.

”I do go that extra mile and undertake further [safety] procedures [that] not even a site the size of Barangaroo will undertake,” he said.

WorkCover said it was satisfied with the asbestos management after visiting the Lidcombe site this week. Auburn Council said it would continue to monitor compliance.











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Children exposed to asbestos

Demolition company fined for dumping asbestos waste

Demolition company fined for dumping asbestos waste

Published: 11:45AM Thursday May 15, 2014 Source: ONE News

  • Asbestos waste (Source: Supplied)

    Asbestos waste – Source: Supplied

A demolition and digger hire company has been fined $67,687 for illegally disposing of asbestos-contaminated demolition waste and clearing native vegetation.

The charges relate to illegal activities at the defendant’s property, including disposing of demolition waste containing asbestos in April last year, clearing native vegetation in a special ecological area and illegal filling between August 2010 and April last year.

The prosecution was brought jointly by Tauranga City Council and Bay of Plenty Regional Council and the affected site is now listed with both councils as contaminated.

In 2013 the two councils both received complaints about demolition material containing asbestos being taken from a church demolition site in Fraser Street to the Grange Road site bordering the reserve. The demolition work was being carried out by C Side Services, a company owned by Stephen Craig Walling.

Samples dug up at the Grange Road site owned by ‘C’ Side Services tested positive for white, brown and blue asbestos, and Mr Walling was issued an abatement notice to stop work. He said he was putting clean-fill, dirt and concrete onto the property to form a driveway to a house site and to create a grassed garden area with exotic palms. He said he had taken 15 truckloads of demolition waste from the church to the Grange Road site and had also allowed two other contractors to deposit concrete and dirt there.

A total of 372 square metres of the Special Ecological Area and its five metre buffer zone had been cleared of vegetation and a concluded that material containing asbestos at the site posed an immediate and long-term risk to human health if no management controls were put in place.

The fines include $22,687 for asbestos disposal, $22,000 for clearing the special ecological area and $23,000 for illegal filling. The defendant is also required to re-vegetate the area and remediate the contaminated land.

    Copyright © 2014, Television New Zealand Limited. Breaking and Daily News, Sport & Weather | TV ONE, TV2 | Ondemand

    Link:

    Demolition company fined for dumping asbestos waste

    Plan to ban disposal of asbestos at Ipswich waste centres

    Topics:

    asbestos,

    riverview recycling and refuse centre

    Plan to ban disposal of asbestos at Ipswich waste centres

    ASBESTOS will no longer be able to be disposed of at any of Ipswich’s waste centres from September 1 this year.

    Councillor Victor Attwood said the Riverview Recycling and Refuse Centre currently accepted waste asbestos from domestic sources but not from commercial customers.

    The Rosewood Recycling and Refuse Centre is not approved to accept waste asbestos from any sources.

    Cr Attwood said council decided to stop accepting asbestos at Riverview as well because it believed it would be safer for residents not to transport asbestos themselves.

    “Council intends to write to the State Government seeking a change to relevant legislation to mandate the disposal of all asbestos by a registered provider,” he said.

    “Currently residents can transport up to 250kg of asbestos themselves.

    “Under Queensland’s current environmental management legislation anyone transporting 250kg or more of waste asbestos, on a non-commercial basis, needs to be a licensed regulated waste transporter.

    “This means that the Riverview Recycling and Refuse Centre cannot accept 250kg or more of waste asbestos from any unlicensed waste transporter including Ipswich residents transporting waste asbestos in their private vehicles.

    “If residents have 250kg or more of waste asbestos that requires disposal, the best option is to engage a commercial waste contractor to undertake the transport and disposal.

    “However, we believe it is not appropriate for residents to deal at all with the disposal of asbestos, no matter the quantity, and that this should only be done by licensed professionals.”

    Enquiries directed to 38106666.

    Continue reading:

    Plan to ban disposal of asbestos at Ipswich waste centres