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June 23, 2018

SCRD sounds alarm on asbestos drywall

Drywall that contains asbestos could end up in the woods unless action is taken at all steps of the disposal process, the Sunshine Coast Regional District (SCRD) worried at its March 1 infrastructure services committee.

The committee sounded the alarm over what it saw as an impending problem in hazardous waste disposal, calling for a meeting of stakeholders at all levels of the disposal process and requesting the provincial government take action.

Last October, drywall recycler New West Gypsum (NWGR) implemented a new screening process for materials entering the facility in order to comply with a WorkSafe BC order.

The new screening method has meant fines for first and second offenders delivering drywall found to contain asbestos to the recycler. A third offence can mean “a permanent ban from any and all NWGR facilities.”

Loads of drywall delivered to SCRD landfills have been routed to NWGR for processing.

Like many landfills in the province, the SCRD has moved toward recycling in response to evidence that land-filled gypsum, a product that can easily be re-used, tends to produce toxic gases as it breaks down.

Drywall made before 1984 is more likely to contain asbestos in the joint compound. To avoid losing access to its recycler in Vancouver, the SCRD will need to find a way to separate the possibly hazardous materials from the clean.

“That’s the problem,” said sustainable service manager Dion Whyte. “I think the solution here really is to get mechanisms in place further up the supply chain where we’re actually dealing with this stuff as it’s coming out of homes.”

One option is to purchase expensive screening equipment like a handheld infrared analyzer, which can cost as much as $30,000.

Another, cheaper option is to refuse pre-1984 gypsum at the landfill altogether.

But that could increase the risk, as ultimately drywall that contains asbestos must be treated at a hazardous materials incinerator before being land-filled – generating worry that the materials could end up illegally dumped in the woods, rather than shipped to Swan Hills, Alta. where such a facility operates.

On the Sunshine Coast, one company that is qualified to carry out asbestos removal from buildings is Solution Based Construction.

“We don’t want it ending up in our woods,” said owner Darren Kopeck. “The biggest thing is the documentation that has to follow each piece of drywall around and make sure it is clean. If it isn’t, it doesn’t get taken.”

Once asbestos is identified in a home or building, the owner must hire someone like Kopeck to carry out the tedious process of removal while abiding by strict safety standards.

Disposal means hiring another company to transport the hazardous material to a facility as far as Swan Hills, where the waste is burned at high temperatures. The added cost could increase the likelihood of the materials simply being illegally dumped instead.

“We can take most types of hazardous waste, but it just comes down to what’s practical,” said Zoltan Nevelos, technical sales representative with the Swan Hills Treatment Centre.

Nevelos dismissed rumours that the facility would be closing its doors to customers in B.C., but said the distance and difficulty of transporting the waste could make incineration an impractical option.

Over at NWGR, spokesperson Cheryl McKitterick said the new policy is designed to protect employees, and screening procedures can be avoided by having proper documentation.

But, said McKitterick, “the ramification of this is causing some significant potential of escalating issues in different municipalities.”

The fines are designed to target contractors, and so far one has been issued.


© Copyright 2015 Coast Reporter

Original source:  

SCRD sounds alarm on asbestos drywall

The Asbestos Institute Releases Captivating New Infographic Entitled The Value Of Safety

The Asbestos Institute Releases Captivating New Infographic Entitled The Value Of Safety

OSHA Violations and related penalties are a real cost concern for businesses in the construction, fabrication, and manufacturing trades. The Asbestos Institute shares a new infographic showing just how smart it is to make safety a priority.

Phoenix, AZ (PRWEB) – The Asbestos Institute, a Phoenix, AZ-based training company that acts as an education and training resource for a variety of industries, recently released an infographic that details the real costs involved when safety isn’t made a priority at the jobsite. OSHA, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, is a federal agency that is tasked with enforcing safety and health laws across the nation. By establishing and reinforcing guidelines and rules regarding safe working conditions for American men and women (as well as those working in certain territories like Guam, the Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico), OSHA can levy steep fines on companies that do not adhere to mandated safety protocols. The Asbestos Institute’s new infographic delivers a high impact message for businesses of all sizes – keep safety a priority!

http://theasbestosinstitute.com/value-of-safety-infographic

Some of the topics addressed by the infographic include: The most frequently cited OSHA standards violations, OSHA penalties by company size, OSHA fines by industry, and a noteworthy facts and stats section. It is enlightening to see just how exposed smaller companies are to OSHA penalties – with businesses of 1-19 individuals seeing the majority of the citations. No matter the business size, it is important to understand the value of safety – $170 billion is lost each year alone due to occupational injuries and illnesses across the nation.

About The Asbestos Institute: The Asbestos Institute, Inc. is a comprehensive training center, located in Phoenix, Arizona, that seeks to educate and protect clients through a diverse group of classes and training seminars. Classes are available at the Phoenix location, or The Asbestos Institute, Inc. can arrange on-site, EPA-approved training meetings throughout the Western United States. Since 1988, the Asbestos Institute, Inc. has helped contractors, building inspectors, asbestos abatement workers, and more, to operate within federally accepted guidelines. The ultimate goal is to improve worker safety and minimize penalties through OSHA.

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The Asbestos Institute Releases Captivating New Infographic Entitled The Value Of Safety

2 companies fined $380,000 over asbestos exposure

OLYMPIA — After state regulators cited and decertified Partners Construction for exposing its workers to asbestos at a Seattle apartment project, a family member from the company started a new business to take its place on the same project.

That business, Asbestos Construction Management, shared workers and equipment used by Partners Construction.

Together, the businesses are being fined about $380,000, according to the state Department of Labor & Industries (L&I).

The violations occurred during the demolition of an apartment building in the Fremont neighborhood where the companies were supposed to remove asbestos before the building was torn down. A three-story building with five units, it featured “popcorn” ceilings and vinyl floors that both contained asbestos.

An L&I investigation between February and May revealed nearly 19 “willful and serious” safety and health violations between work done by the two companies. Workers were exposed to asbestos, and hazardous debris was left on site, according to a statement Friday from L&I.

Donald Murray, listed in state documents as the owner of Asbestos Construction Management, did not return a call or email seeking comment.

Asbestos, a mineral fiber found in soil and rocks, has been used in buildings and automobiles, among other things, and today is used in small amounts in a few products. It can cause mesothelioma and lung cancer, and even has its own potentially fatal disease named after it: asbestosis.

The state fined Partners Construction, which was based in Federal Way, for $291,950 for 14 violations. Asbestos Construction Management, of Bonney Lake, was fined $87,150 for five violations.

Before Partners Construction was decertified to handle asbestos and went out of business, it provided the apartment building’s owner in March with a letter stating that all asbestos had been removed.

But when L&I inspectors responded to a worker complaint, they found the site “grossly contaminated,” with about 5,400 square feet of popcorn ceiling and some vinyl flooring remaining in the building.

The companies have 15 business days to appeal the citations. Money paid toward the citations are put in a workers’ compensation pension fund to help injured workers, as well as families of workers who have died.

And L&I is pursuing further action against Asbestos Construction Management.

“We are taking steps to decertify that company,” said Elaine Fischer, spokeswoman for L&I. “We’ve begun the process; they’ve been notified.”

Joseph O’Sullivan: 360-236-8268



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2 companies fined $380,000 over asbestos exposure

New campaign on asbestos exposure

Construction workers and tradespeople including carpenters and painters could come into contact with asbestos more than 100 times a year, with few knowing whether the deadly dust is in newer buildings, according to a report.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) launched a new safety campaign amid concerns of confusion on how to combat exposure to asbestos.

With 20 people dying every week from asbestos-related diseases, the HSE revealed some common myths, such as drinking water or opening a window to keep workers safe.

A survey of 500 tradespeople showed that fewer than a third could identify the correct measures for safe asbestos working, while only 15% knew that the dust could still be found in buildings built up to the year 2000.

Fewer than one in five knew that asbestos could be hidden in toilet seats and cisterns.

Health and safety minister Mark Harper said: “The number dying every year from asbestos-related diseases is unacceptably high. Despite being banned in the construction industry, asbestos exposure remains a very serious risk to tradespeople. This safety campaign is about highlighting the risks and easy measures people can take to protect themselves.”

Philip White, HSE’s chief inspector for construction, said: “Asbestos is still a very real danger and the survey findings suggest that the people who come into contact with it regularly often don’t know where it could be and worryingly don’t know how to deal with it correctly, which could put them in harm’s way.

“Our new campaign aims to help tradespeople understand some of the simple steps they can take to stay safe. Our new web app is designed for use on a job so workers can easily identify if they are likely to face danger and can then get straightforward advice to help them do the job safely.”

Steve Murphy, general secretary of construction union Ucatt, said “Construction workers are the greatest risk of being exposed to asbestos. Any campaign that warns workers of the dangers of asbestos is to be welcomed. However the campaign needs to be as wide ranging as possible and should not be confined to one company to distribute information.

“Over the last four and a half years, thousands of workers have been needlessly exposed to asbestos and their health has been put at risk because of that decision”

“It is vital that construction workers receive proper training in the dangers of asbestos, where it is likely to be found and what to do if you suspect asbestosis present. It is essential that pressure is placed on employers to ensure that training takes place and that workers are not victimised or threatened when raising concerns about asbestos, which is often the case.”

Original article – 

New campaign on asbestos exposure

Winnipeg contractor in botched asbestos job has criminal past

A Winnipeg contractor who was recently sanctioned for a botched asbestos removal job has a long criminal history that includes convictions for fraud and theft, the CBC News I-Team has learned.

Workman Industries owner John Sirenn’s criminal record dates back to 1959 with convictions for cashing thousands of dollars in fake cheques and for stealing copper wire and electronics from other businesses, according to court documents.

The documents also show he once fled from a traffic check stop when he was not licensed to drive. His vehicle crashed into a hydro pole that fell within inches of a woman’s head.

“Absolutely disgusted,” said Jon Cameron, whose family filed a complaint against Workman after crews botched an asbestos remediation job at his parents’ house, sending asbestos into the air.

“I mean, how is it that somebody who is consistently violating laws and regulations, putting people’s well-being at risk, how is he still able to work in this city?”

In August, Sirenn and his crew were caught on video dragging asbestos-covered materials — without wearing protective gear — through Rafaelita and Victor Cameron’s home in Point Douglas.

Manitoba’s Workplace Safety and Health issued stop-work orders against Workman and Sarte Heating and Cooling, as well as ordered Workman to decontaminate the house.

However, that work wasn’t done. The Camerons have been out of their home for nearly two months.

“There’s no way that this man should still be working. There’s no way he should still have a company,” Cameron said of Sirenn.

Sirenn has refused to speak to CBC News. Officials from Sarte Heating and Cooling have not responded to a request for comment.

No protective masks

Cameron’s mother, Rafaelita Cameron, had hired Sarte Heating and Cooling to replace their old boiler system with a new high-efficiency furnace.

However, the company could not carry out the installation until the old boiler — which was covered in asbestos — was removed.

So Sarte arranged for Workman Industries to go to the Point Douglas home on Aug. 7 to do the remediation.

When the Workman crew arrived, the family said they noticed the workers were not wearing protective masks or equipment. As well, they said they were not instructed to stay away.

Rafaelita Cameron said she confronted one of the workers when the family realized there were no barriers created to separate the basement job site from the rest of the home.

Jon Cameron videotaped as Workman crews removed the old asbestos-covered boiler in pieces without wrapping any of it in plastic.

The family has since decided to pay out of pocket to get the house remediated so they can replace the boiler and move back in.

Another company, Associated Environmental Services, has since been hired to carry out the asbestos remediation.

‘It was just deplorable’

AES project manager Jason Driedger said his crews had to vacuum and wipe down every surface in the house — a task that he said took them two weekends.

“I came in and took an initial look at the place and I was shocked,” he said.

“Open bags of materials and, I mean, it was just deplorable — as a homeowner, nothing you would ever want to see and nothing you should see.”

Driedger said the workers that Workman Industries hired may not have even known the dangers of what they were handling.

Undisturbed asbestos-containing materials generally don’t pose a health risk, according to Health Canada and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

It’s only when the asbestos is disturbed, and the dust is emitted into the air, that it poses a risk to human health, the agencies say. In significant quantities, asbestos fibres can cause asbestosis and lung cancer.

Workman Industries was issued a cease and desist order to stop using the Certificate of Recognition (COR) Program logo on its website.

The COR certification is obtained through the Construction Safety Association of Manitoba and typically means a company has a safety and health program that meets national standards.

When CBC News contacted the association last month, it said Workman Industries has never been certified by them.

“It really turns my stomach because we’re trying so hard in this industry to make it safe for everybody and to do a proper job, and then you see somebody who just comes in and completely ruins people’s houses,” Driedger said.

“It’s just terrible and it makes the rest of us, the legit companies, look really bad.”

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Winnipeg contractor in botched asbestos job has criminal past

Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency faces the chop

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Mr Tighe has spent nine months in the new job and has already taken a particular interest in Canberra’s pressing problem of 1050 homes containing remnant loose amosite asbestos in the form of Mr Fluffy insulation. Mr Tighe has labelled these homes unliveable and has called on the ACT and Commonwealth governments to come together to seek a solution for affected families.

Meanwhile, asbestos disease support groups have warned of the human cost of abandoning a whole-of-government approach and accused the Coalition of a split over the issue.

Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency head Peter Tighe.

Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency head Peter Tighe. Photo: Louie Douvis

When Labor set up the agency last year following the recommendations of a two-year review into Australia’s asbestos problems, it received bipartisan support from the Coalition.

At the time the legislation was being tabled, Liberal Senator Eric Abetz told the Senate: “Now that we as a community are fully aware of all the dangers of asbestos and the effects that it has on people exposed to it, it makes good sense for all sides of politics and for unions and employers to join together to try to overcome the legacy issues that are clearly out there. Those legacy issues will remain with us as a country for at least another 30 years.”

Senator Abetz also highlighted the flaws in the existing approach to asbestos management throughout Australia. “The involvement of multiple governments across these diverse areas means that efforts to date to address asbestos issues have been fragmented and duplicative,” he said.

Senator Abetz is now the Employment Minister in charge of the agency. A spokeswoman said on Thursday: “The Commission of Audit’s proposals are recommendations to government; they are not recommendations by government. No decisions have yet been made in relation to the agency. The government remains committed to working with the states and territories to remove asbestos risks and this will not change.”

But seven asbestos disease support groups – including the Bernie Banton Foundation, Asbestos Diseases Society of Australia and the Asbestos Victims Association – warned there would be a human cost of abandoning a whole-of-government approach. They are joined by the Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union, which has also called for continued funding of the agency to maintain safeguards for workers.

Australia has the highest per capita rate of asbestos diseases in the world, with the deadly substance still found in millions of homes and workplaces.

Asbestos has claimed the lives of more than 33,000 Australians, and the groups said in a joint statement “an independent, national agency is a significant step in the fight against asbestos diseases, providing a strong, focused, consistent, co-ordinated national approach to improved asbestos education and removal activities”.

ACT Work Safety Commissioner Mark McCabe, who is the local appointee to the agency, said it would be “a huge loss if the agency folded”.

“It is co-ordinating a national response to the management of asbestos and taking a leadership role to ensure it is done appropriately,” he said. “Without that, the potential is a continued fragmented approach to what is one of the most serious safety issues confronting our society”.

The head of the Fluffy Owners and Residents Action Group Brianna Heseltine said the agency had played a vital role in informing owners and residents about Mr Fluffy’s troubling legacy on their homes.

“Mr Tighe’s call for the demolition of our homes put Canberra on high alert about the serious health risks posed by the likelihood of ongoing loose-fill asbestos contamination, and drew attention to the absence of legislative protections for residents,” she said. “The ACT government’s February 18 letter was conspicuously silent on the main issue at stake for our community – health – focusing instead on the increased burdens owners must bear when carrying out even minor internal works.

“Owners and residents are likely to feel left high and dry if the agency is abolished only weeks after putting this vital issue on the map.”











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Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency faces the chop

Asbestos fine tied to councillor

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Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union organiser Mansour Razaghi said he became alarmed after seeing workers without complete asbestos protective gear working in close proximity to passing school children.

”The kids were just one or two metres away from the excavation machine and from where a worker was hand-picking the asbestos fragments from the soil,” he said.

The site also lacked appropriate fencing, public warning signs about asbestos and decontamination for trucks and workers leaving the site, Mr Razaghi said.

However, Cr Mehajer accused ”a third party” of planting some of the potentially deadly material in a bid to discredit him.

Cr Mehajer said long-buried asbestos had been found but later questioned the quantity, professing to be ”familiar with every soil grain” at the John Street address.

”For me to come across contaminated soil with asbestos really does raise concerns to who trespasses my site after hours and dumps such hazardous material to target me,” Cr Mehajer said in an email.

Asked who he thought was behind such a plot, Cr Mehajer responded: ”Maybe you?”

But another Auburn councillor, Tony Oldfield, dismissed Cr Mehajer’s suspicions as ”a really stupid comment”.

”The reason we found out about asbestos was by accident,” said Cr Oldfield. ”The complaints from local residents were actually about the dust coming from the site.”

Mr Razaghi claims asbestos sheeting was also being removed from an adjoining Ann Street property owned by Cr Mehajer and damaged by fire.

Work has resumed at the site this week.

A Department of Education and Communities spokesman said Lidcombe Public School had been unaware of the asbestos exposure when contacted by Fairfax Media this week.

But Cr Mehajer denied that there had been any safety breaches by his company, Sydney Project Group, or its subcontractor, pointing to an air-monitoring report that found calculated concentrations of asbestos fibres to be less than the reporting limit of 0.01 fibres/mL.

”I do go that extra mile and undertake further [safety] procedures [that] not even a site the size of Barangaroo will undertake,” he said.

WorkCover said it was satisfied with the asbestos management after visiting the Lidcombe site this week. Auburn Council said it would continue to monitor compliance.











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Asbestos fine tied to councillor

James Hardie profit surges, but asbestos claims still rising

Building materials firm James Hardie has more than doubled its profit and announced a special dividend.

The company’s statutory net profit rose to $US99.5 million for the year to March 31, up from $45.5 million in its previous financial year.

James Hardie says its underlying full-year profit was $US197.2 million when its significant asbestos compensation exposures, ASIC expenses, New Zealand product liability, asset write-downs and tax adjustments are excluded, up from $US140.8 million last year.

The firm’s chief executive Louis Gries says James Hardie’s US and European businesses contributed much to the profit surge.

“Net sales increased 22 per cent in the quarter and 19 per cent for the full year, reflecting stronger volumes, a higher average net sales price and the continued strengthening of the US housing construction market,” he noted in the report.

The company says US single family housing starts were 615,400 for the year to March 31, up 9 per cent on the prior year according to the US Census Bureau.

In the Australian market, the number of detached home approvals – which generate the most demand for the firm’s key fibre cement building products – was up 16 per cent to 104,394, but James Hardie says that has been partially offset by a fall in renovations.

Mr Gries says the construction turnaround is prompting significant investment to increase its manufacturing capacity.

“During financial year ’14, we confirmed our commitment to build the infrastructure to grow our business with the reopening of our Fontana, California location, the commencement of capacity expansion projects at our Cleburne, Texas and Plant City, Florida locations and the construction of a new manufacturing line at our Carole Park, Queensland location,” he said.

“To further capitalise on the projected growth in the US housing market, and our anticipated market share growth across all of our businesses, the company intends to increase its levels of capital expenditure to an average of approximately US$200 million per year over the next three years.”

In addition to the capital investment, James Hardie has announced a full-year special dividend of 20 US cents per share, in addition to its ordinary dividend of 32 US cents per share.

James Hardie securities were up 3.7 per cent to $14.19 by 12:20pm (AEST) on the Australian market as a result.

Asbestos exposures

James Hardie has reported $US195.8 million in adjustments for asbestos liabilities in its annual accounts, up from $US117.1 million last year.

The company says accounting firm KPMG’s current estimate of total asbestos liabilities for Australia, net of insurance claims, has risen to $1.547 billion this financial year from $1.345 billion last.

The main reason for the rise, according to the report, is a continued increase in claims by asbestos victims suffering mesothelioma, a rare form of cancer generally affecting the lungs and typically caused by asbestos exposure.

James Hardie says actuaries had previously assumed a peak in mesothelioma claims to have occurred in 2010-11, however the past two years of claims have been above expectations.

In the year to March 31, a total of 608 asbestos-related claims were received, a 12 per cent rise from 542 claims the previous year, and well above expectations of 540 claims.

James Hardie says 604 claims were settled in its 2014 financial year, with an average settlement of $253,000, resulting in a total payout of $140.4 million for the year.

Mesothelioma claims jumped almost 20 per cent in the year to March 31 2014, to 370, up from 309 the year before, 259 in 2011-12 and 268 in 2010-11.

KPMG had previously expected only 300 mesothelioma claims in its forecasts.

Mesothelioma claims are far more expensive for the company, with the average settlement sitting at $308,000, compared to around $100,000 for asbestosis or lung cancer.

There were also seven “large” mesothelioma claims over $1 million, worth a total of $11.6 million.

The company warns that, if claims do not start reducing until after 2018-19 the estimated claims total of more than $1.5 billion could rise a further 22 per cent on top of this financial year’s increase.

KPMG says it is too early to tell whether the higher number of claims will be sustained based on one year’s worth of increased claims.

However, James Hardie’s chief financial officer Matt Marsh says the impact on the company’s bottom line will be capped, and it is fulfilling all its requirements to the asbestos compensation fund.

“We’ll make a payment in July of $US113 million and that will be in compliance with our obligation under the [agreement] to contribute up to 35 per cent of our operating cash flow,” he told analysts on an investor briefing.

“The second part of that question is will that be enough to pay for the liabilities, and that’s a question that’s better asked of the AICF [Asbestos Injuries Compensation Fund].”

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James Hardie profit surges, but asbestos claims still rising

Auckland primary school closed over asbestos scare

Auckland primary school closed over asbestos scare

Published: 10:52AM Thursday May 08, 2014 Source: ONE News

  • A construction site which saw Bayfield School close. (Source: ONE News reporter Ruth Wynn-Williams)

    A construction site which saw Bayfield School close. – Source: ONE News reporter Ruth Wynn-Williams

  • Bayfield School has been closed due to health and safety concerns. (Source: ONE News reporter Ruth Wynn-Williams)

    Bayfield School in the Auckland suburb of Herne Bay has been closed due to health and safety concerns. – Source: ONE News reporter Ruth Wynn-Williams

Two separate investigations have been launched into the closure of a school in the Auckland suburb of Herne Bay after the demolition of buildings prompted an asbestos scare.

Bayfield School’s Board of Trustees last night made the decision to close the school until further notice after testing on the building site found asbestos dust. The construction work began on April 7.

Both the Ministry of Education and Worksafe NZ have announced they’ll be investigating the issue and that the children won’t return to school until tests prove that it is safe.

WorkSafe NZ has prohibited any further work on the school site, and further tests would be carried out today to see if the area outside the fences was asbestos-free.

Head of the Education Infrastructure Service Kim Shannon says the Ministry is working with the school to make provision for the students’ education and that they are expected to be back at school early next week.

“We fully support the decision of the Board of Trustees of Bayfield School to temporarily close the school as a precautionary measure, while we investigate concerns about demolition of some buildings on the school site,” says Ms Shannon.

Parents working on the construction alerted the Board to the problem, according to Chair of the Bayfield Board of Trustees David McPherson, who also says the Board had been “constantly monitoring” the construction job.

“To date we have been satisfied with the process being applied but during the course of today we have become increasingly concerned with the position,” the Board said in a statement.

“This concern has been borne out by a number of tests carried out that indicated the possibility that asbestos dust exists outside the fenced area of works.”

The Ministry says they were aware that there was asbestos on the site from the first day of construction and had hired a “specialist asbestos contractor”. However, they are unsure why a problem has occurred now.

WorkSafe is the site regulator, and the school and the building contractor are responsible for site safety. The person responsible for on-site safety at the school was being managed by an independent person appointed by the Ministry of Education.

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    Auckland primary school closed over asbestos scare

    Asbestos removal projects planned for Roundhouse

    One asbestos removal project was approved while another was let out to bid by the school board for the Marshalltown High School Roundhouse project during a meeting Monday.

    The board approved a quote of $22,992 from REW Services of Ankeny to remove asbestos from thermal pipe insulation at the high school gym. The board also let out to bid an estimated $122,500 project to remove asbestos from the asphalt of the indoor running track at the Roundhouse.

    Both projects were bid separately than the general construction project going on now as this work is done by specific asbestos removal companies.

    Article Photos

    T-R PHOTO BY ANDREW POTTER
    Two asbestos removal projects are planned for the Marshalltown High School Roundhouse as it undergoes a renovation. The Marshalltown School Board discusses the matter during a meeting Monday.

    “Asbestos abatement is always a component of our construction projects,” said Rick Simpson, director of buildings and grounds with the district.

    The thermal pipe asbestos removal is expected to be done at night and on weekends in May while the asphalt track asbestos removal is a June project, after bids are approved on May 5.

    Simpson said the asphalt asbestos removal work will not slow up the general contractor working on the Roundhouse renovation as they plan to work on opposite ends of the facility.

    “It’s not holding up construction,” Simpson said.

    The asbestos removal items were the only two agenda items aside from policy work during a brief regular meeting of the board. The next regular meeting of the school board will be at 5:30 p.m. May 5 at Miller Middle School.

    Excerpt from: 

    Asbestos removal projects planned for Roundhouse