_ap_ufes{"success":true,"siteUrl":"friableasbestos.com","urls":{"Home":"http://friableasbestos.com","Category":"http://friableasbestos.com/category/current-asbestos-news/","Archive":"http://friableasbestos.com/2015/04/","Post":"http://friableasbestos.com/asbestos-firms-ready-to-fight-silvers-slanted-legal-system/","Page":"http://friableasbestos.com/effect-asbestos-mesothelioma/","Nav_menu_item":"http://friableasbestos.com/69/"}}_ap_ufee

June 23, 2018

Fairfield residents fear post-storm asbestos threat

Asbestos lurking

A $320,000 project to create an “environmental playground” adjacent to America the Beautiful Park has been halted pending further investigation of asbestos unearthed during excavation.

The discovery of buried asbestos tiles will delay the project for up to 120 days to allow for mitigation and regulatory oversight and approval, city officials say. The site, which lies on the southwest side of the park area and north of Cimarron Bridge, is enclosed with a chain-link fence and is not accessible to the public, according to the city.

In July, Colorado Springs Utilities was performing rough grading along Monument Creek as an in-kind contribution to the America the Beautiful Creekside Project, which is largely funded by Great Outdoors Colorado (“We’ve got your beach,” News, July 2). “During these activities, Utilities personnel encountered historical undocumented artificial fill material, which included potential asbestos-containing floor tiles adhered to concrete rubble,” Utilities spokeswoman Patrice Lehermeier says via email.

Lehermeier says the material, discovered in the ground less than 10 feet deep, was identified as non-friable asbestos, less dangerous than friable asbestos, which if inhaled is a known carcinogen.

“Utilities and City personnel have taken steps to stabilize the site for the protection of human health and the environment, which have included the removal of visible potential asbestos containing materials from the surface of the excavated areas and the on-site stockpile,” she says.

Utilities also notified the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and the city has retained an environmental consultant to assist in following regulatory requirements. Utilities has applied a “tackifier,” a sticky substance that bonds to surfaces and minimizes emissions from the asbestos, which Lehermeier says is not a threat to water in the creek.

While Lehermeier says officials have yet to determine the exact size of the asbestos-ridden area, Parks Department official Chris Lieber says via email that the tiles are concentrated in 75 square feet.

“We are currently working with our consultant [Pinyon Environmental] to develop an estimated cost for addressing the asbestos-containing material,” Lieber says. “The overall project timeline is anticipated to be delayed by approximately 90 to 120 days,” which includes time for state regulatory review.

The creekside project aims to expand the floodplain, enhance riparian habitat, and provide a transition from park to creek. The work includes adding trails, boulders, logs, boardwalks and play areas.

“The project design is currently being re-evaluated to ensure protection of park users and the environment,” Lehermeier says. “To complete the rough grading activities under the original project design, around 2,000 cubic yards of additional soil needs to be excavated and removed from the site.”

It’s the second time in recent years that pollutants have emerged in the area of the park. In March 2013, Kat Tudor and Don Goede sued the city, alleging suspected cancer-causing contaminants blew onto their Smokebrush Foundation property immediately north from a demolition site at 25 Cimino Drive.

The city had been in the process of razing a Utilities building, which sat atop a site that hosted a gas plant from 1880 to 1931 and left behind coal tar, which contains carcinogens. The case is pending while the city appeals a District Court ruling that denied the city’s motion to dismiss.

See original article here:  

Asbestos lurking

Landfill facing asbestos concerns during storm repairs in Madison County

Canastota (WSYR-TV) – The ruins of a former antique store and a karate business have been piled in a heap in Oneida since early July. The biggest obstacle to getting it cleaned up appears to be money.

“They have to truck it all the way out to Seneca Falls. That’s the nearest dump that allows it from our area,” said Heath Waterman, who owns part of the property.

He has a contractor lined up to haul away his portion of the rubble, once he has the money saved to pay for the trip.

“The fact is that we do not accept friable asbestos in the Madison County landfill,” explained Madison County Department of Solid Waste and Sanitation Director James Zecca.

Too small to handle that type of waste, the Madison County landfill is getting swamped with calls from homeowners wondering what to do with materials containing asbestos.

“With all of the storms that we’ve been having, unfortunately people’s homes have been damaged and they are doing some major renovations, and in worse case scenarios it is complete demolition of their homes,” Zecca said.

The landfill director is hoping to educate property owners about the rules. Zecca recommends a survey by state certified inspectors before any renovation work begins, identifying areas for removing friable or non-friable asbestos separately.

Zecca says powdery friable asbestos, often found on pipe insulation and various building materials, can cost up to $200 a ton to unload in other landfills. However, non-friable asbestos on floor tiles or roof shingles, among other things, is accepted at the Madison County landfill, for far less money.

An inspector will help property owners determine the difference before they start tearing a room apart, so they can contain removal of friable asbestos separately, minimizing trips to other landfills.

“Once the building is down, there is no way of identifying where the asbestos is located. So, what the state does is, they step in and say all of the debris, the total house now is considered contaminated with friable asbestos.”

There’s no proof that Waterman’s building contained friable asbestos. But, there’s also no proof it did not contain the waste. He didn’t have an updated asbestos report on record when the City of Oneida ordered an emergency demolition after the wall collapsed.

Now, as a precaution, all of the rubble is classified as possibly containing friable asbestos.

Without the money to transport the debris at the higher rate of disposal, Waterman has a mess that he hopes others can avoid.

“You’d think for something so dangerous they would have more dumps available, so you wouldn’t have to truck it two hours one way,” Waterman said.

Zecca recommends that homeowners hire professionals to handle asbestos.

Residents looking for more information about disposal can call the Madison County Recycling Hotline at 1-800-721-2208 or click here to find details online.

More:  

Landfill facing asbestos concerns during storm repairs in Madison County

Asbestos removed as Broad Street Parkway construction continues

NASHUA — So far, about 17,000 cubic yards of asbestos has been mitigated and disposed of during construction on the Broad Street Parkway.

That amount, according to project manager John Vancor, is slightly less than expected. Initially, crews were anticipating that 16,500 cubic yards of asbestos would be encountered and disposed of on site, in addition to 3,000 cubic yards that would have to be taken off of the site for disposal, he said.

“All of the asbestos encountered has been disposed of,” said Vancor, adding two independent teams of professionals are making sure that all asbestos safeguards are in place.

The majority of asbestos has been located within the northern portion of the roadway work, although a small amount has been found elsewhere, according to Vancor.

Aside from the asbestos, crews are now dealing with problems of urban fill found inside certain areas of the project that must also be disposed of, he explained.

Progress on the Broad Street Parkway, a nearly two-mile urban roadway that will provide another crossing over the Nashua River, is moving ahead on schedule and on budget.

“There is quite a bit of activity going on,” Vancor said this week.

He said a retaining wall is being constructed, a new sewer pipe has been installed and a trestle into the river is underway.Earth work has also begun in the north sector of the roadway project, according to Vancor, who has heard complaints about vibrations at nearby buildings.”I know there is a lot of concern,” he said, acknowledging there is quite a bit of ground vibrations. However, he stressed that no blasting is taking place as part of the Broad Street Parkway project.
As construction progresses, he said there are still properties that must be acquired to pave way for the roadway. Acquisition of those properties by the state Department of Transportation is ongoing, said Vancor.There are some surplus properties no longer needed for the parkway since its original route was altered. Vancor said those properties must be sold within the next year to help offset the bond, otherwise the money will be returned to the federal government.One of the surplus properties includes the Nashua Police Department’s current training facility.

Alderman-at-Large James Donchess said he would like the city to retain that parcel at 82 Pine St. Ext., questioning Vancor this week on whether keeping that property would be feasible. Donchess also asked whether some of the surplus properties could be leased by the city.

Vancor said he would have to seek clarification on those matters.

In the meantime, he said there is still some demolition that remains at 44 Broad St., a parcel that was previously taken by eminent domain as part of the Broad Street Parkway project but is no longer necessary for the revised path of the roadway.
The parcel, which is now being used as a staging area for one of the parkway contractors, was previously occupied by Mayhem Ink, Aidan James Salon, Wizard Cycles and Gregory J. Fine Flooring and Design. The plot was originally considered for the relocation of the David W. Deane Skateboard Park, but other sites are now being evaluated for the park.The Broad Street Parkway, which will cost about $60 million to complete, will provide another crossing over the Nashua River and allow motorists to bypass Amherst Street, possibly alleviating downtown traffic and potentially attracting more business to the Millyard Technology Park.

Construction includes a new Nashua River Bridge, as well as construction to the Baldwin and Fairmount Street bridges. Work has already begun on Baldwin Street, and the bridge there is expected to be completed by the start of the next school year.

Work on the Fairmount Street Bridge will begin once Baldwin Street is finished, and that section of the project should be completed in about a year. The new Nashua River Bridge will be finished prior to that, with an opening date planned for May 1, 2015.

khoughton@newstote.com

View the original here – 

Asbestos removed as Broad Street Parkway construction continues

Boulder City bypass project hits snag with naturally occurring asbestos discovery

CARSON CITY – Discovery of naturally occurring asbestos in the soils in a section of the proposed Boulder City bypass will cause a delay in the project as the state conducts a more comprehensive study.

“This was a bombshell that was dropped,” Gov. Brian Sandoval said Monday during a meeting of the state Transportation Board.

John Terry, assistant director of the state Transportation Department, said Monday the department’s own environmental studies conducted earlier did not detect the asbestos, which was discovered by a team of UNLV researchers and reported in December. ”We have never dealt with this before.”

He said after the UNLV findings were released, the department immediately assembled a task force to determine the most suitable way to progress with the project given the highly sensitive nature of the potential health risk to workers and residents in Boulder City and the surrounding areas.

The news also caused the department to cancel a contract for a frontage road.

Terry said the project would require a lot of dirt to be moved, resulting in a lot of flying dust, which could carry asbestos particles. Any asbestos-carrying dust would pose health risks to workers and nearby communities, board members were advised. Federal and international agencies have determined that asbestos is a human carcinogen.

“This could be a show stopper,” said Sandoval, who chairs the Transportation Board.

The Transportation Department’s task force determined the most appropriate strategy moving forward would be to procure an expert to do additional soil testing and a full analysis for asbestos concentrations within the project area. The Transportation Board authorized the department to spend up to $400,000 to hire a consultant to perform the study.

Tina Quigley, general manager of the Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada, said the agency has hired its own consultant, who has discovered the naturally occurring asbestos in two of the 10 holes surveyed. Quigley said 200 holes would be surveyed and the results should be known by May 21.

The RTC is joining with the state to finance the bypass.

Terry did not estimate the length of the delay.

In other action, the board approved spending $5.5 million for safety improvements and repaving of cracking surfaces on State Route 157, known as Kyle Canyon Road in Clark County.

The state originally put up $2 million for the $20 million project, which is mostly on federal land. The added $5.5 million will extend the road surface for another 10 years, Terry said.

The department accepted $20 million from the city of Las Vegas as its share for right of way and construction of the Martin Luther King extension over Charleston Boulevard.

And the department is contributing $35 million for construction of the airport connector project in Clark County, expected to cost more than $60 million, said Rudy Malfabon, director of the state Transportation Department.

Source: 

Boulder City bypass project hits snag with naturally occurring asbestos discovery

'I just put on gloves and got on with it'

The asbestos was left on the verge for two months before the woman moved it back into her backyard.

The asbestos was left on the verge for two months before the woman moved it back into her backyard. Photo: Echo Newspapers

The Swan shire has come under fire for leaving a pile of asbestos on a verge in Middle Swan for around two months, without covering it or putting on any signage to warn people of the health hazard.

The debris was created when a resident on the corner of Bishop Road and Brown Street pulled down the fence and dumped it in the yard of the house next door – before she erected a new fence.

When unwitting tenants moved into the house on Brown Street they assumed the asbestos was fibro and took the pile to the tip.

But the tip refused to accept the asbestos because the hazardous material was not properly wrapped.

Advertisement

Following his unsuccessful trip to the tip, the worried tenant put the asbestos on the verge to keep it away from his partner and her two children, and the pile has sat on the verge uncovered since before Christmas.

Brown Street resident Rita Reinholdtsen said at least six phone calls had been made to alert the shire about the asbestos on the verge by concerned neighbours, but it was not removed.

“Instead the owner of the fence kept getting extensions on the timeframe she was given to move the asbestos pile she had created.”

“At the very least the shire should have covered it or put tape around it or signs to alert people of the health risks.

“There’s a young lass next door who is pregnant, she walks to school with her four-year-old and her mother-in-law and they walk right past it every day.”

The Asbestos Diseases Society of Australia president Robert Vojakovic agreed the shire had been irresponsible.

“It has been reported to the city, they know it’s on the verge, they can remove the asbestos and recoup the cost,” he said.

“The fact it has been allowed to sit on the verge since before Christmas is extraordinary.

“There is also the issue of risk management – you can’t expect ordinary people to clean this up.”

Shortly after Echo News put an enquiry in to the city the resident who originally pulled the fence down was told by a council representative she had to remove the pile as a priority.

So she, and her two teenage daughters, picked the asbestos sheets up off the verge and threw them back over the fence into thier backyard.

Mrs Reinholdtsen said she was horrified to watch them handle the asbestos without any masks on.

“They just had gloves and shorts on – no protective clothing and obviously they don’t understand that fibres get stuck in your clothing and lungs.”

The woman who removed the asbestos said she recieved no help from the shire.

“I would have been fine paying back the shire if they removed the asbestos and then billed me but when I asked them who could I contact to remove the pile for us, if they knew a contractor, I was told to use Google.”

She said she felt pressured after a phone call from the shire on Tuesday, so she put on some gloves and just got on with it.

But Slater & Gordon asbestos lawyer Laine McDonald said residents who cleaned up disturbed asbestos risked being exposed, especially without adequate respiratory protection.

“Around 250 Western Australians die every year from asbestos-related diseases and as long as asbestos products remain in our community we continue to be at risk.”

A Department of Health spokesperson said the City of Swan’s environmental health officer was the first point of contact for residential asbestos issues.

The spokesperson said if a resident had problems contacting the shire they could call the Health Department’s Environmental Health Directorate on 9388 4999.

“[The directorate] will follow-up with the relevant local government to ensure that any potential risk to public health has been appropriately managed.”

The spokesperson said it was not the City of Swan’s responsibility to remove the asbestos.

“But it can do if there is a default in complying with a notice, and costs can be recouped at a later stage.

“Under the Health (Asbestos) Regulations there is no set timeframe when asbestos needs to be removed.

“However, a notice or verbal advice would normally specify that this would be expected as soon as possible and practical.”

Mr McDonald said anyone who was worried about exposure to asbestos should add their details to Slater & Gordon’s online register.

“These important particulars are recorded in perpetuity, so that people don’t have to remember vital details if they’re dealing with an asbestos-related disease in decades to come.”

The City of Swan was contacted for comment.

– Echo Newspapers

Continued here:

'I just put on gloves and got on with it'

Asbestos debris left on verge for months

The asbestos was left on the verge for two months before the woman moved it back into her backyard.

The asbestos was left on the verge for two months before the woman moved it back into her backyard. Photo: Echo Newspapers

The Swan shire has come under fire for leaving a pile of asbestos on a verge in Middle Swan for around two months, without covering it or putting on any signage to warn people of the health hazard.

The debris was created when a resident on the corner of Bishop Road and Brown Street pulled down the fence and dumped it in the yard of the house next door – before she erected a new fence.

When unwitting tenants moved into the house on Brown Street they assumed the asbestos was fibro and took the pile to the tip.

But the tip refused to accept the asbestos because the hazardous material was not properly wrapped.

Advertisement

Following his unsuccessful trip to the tip, the worried tenant put the asbestos on the verge to keep it away from his partner and her two children, and the pile has sat on the verge uncovered since before Christmas.

Brown Street resident Rita Reinholdtsen said at least six phone calls had been made to alert the shire about the asbestos on the verge by concerned neighbours, but it was not removed.

“Instead the owner of the fence kept getting extensions on the timeframe she was given to move the asbestos pile she had created.”

“At the very least the shire should have covered it or put tape around it or signs to alert people of the health risks.

“There’s a young lass next door who is pregnant, she walks to school with her four-year-old and her mother-in-law and they walk right past it every day.”

The Asbestos Diseases Society of Australia president Robert Vojakovic agreed the shire had been irresponsible.

“It has been reported to the city, they know it’s on the verge, they can remove the asbestos and recoup the cost,” he said.

“The fact it has been allowed to sit on the verge since before Christmas is extraordinary.

“There is also the issue of risk management – you can’t expect ordinary people to clean this up.”

Shortly after Echo News put an enquiry in to the city the resident who originally pulled the fence down was told by a council representative she had to remove the pile as a priority.

So she, and her two teenage daughters, picked the asbestos sheets up off the verge and threw them back over the fence into thier backyard.

Mrs Reinholdtsen said she was horrified to watch them handle the asbestos without any masks on.

“They just had gloves and shorts on – no protective clothing and obviously they don’t understand that fibres get stuck in your clothing and lungs.”

The woman who removed the asbestos said she recieved no help from the shire.

“I would have been fine paying back the shire if they removed the asbestos and then billed me but when I asked them who could I contact to remove the pile for us, if they knew a contractor, I was told to use Google.”

She said she felt pressured after a phone call from the shire on Tuesday, so she put on some gloves and just got on with it.

But Slater & Gordon asbestos lawyer Laine McDonald said residents who cleaned up disturbed asbestos risked being exposed, especially without adequate respiratory protection.

“Around 250 Western Australians die every year from asbestos-related diseases and as long as asbestos products remain in our community we continue to be at risk.”

A Department of Health spokesperson said the City of Swan’s environmental health officer was the first point of contact for residential asbestos issues.

The spokesperson said if a resident had problems contacting the shire they could call the Health Department’s Environmental Health Directorate on 9388 4999.

“[The directorate] will follow-up with the relevant local government to ensure that any potential risk to public health has been appropriately managed.”

The spokesperson said it was not the City of Swan’s responsibility to remove the asbestos.

“But it can do if there is a default in complying with a notice, and costs can be recouped at a later stage.

“Under the Health (Asbestos) Regulations there is no set timeframe when asbestos needs to be removed.

“However, a notice or verbal advice would normally specify that this would be expected as soon as possible and practical.”

Mr McDonald said anyone who was worried about exposure to asbestos should add their details to Slater & Gordon’s online register.

“These important particulars are recorded in perpetuity, so that people don’t have to remember vital details if they’re dealing with an asbestos-related disease in decades to come.”

The City of Swan was contacted for comment.

– Echo Newspapers

More here:

Asbestos debris left on verge for months

Asbestos cleanup set to begin at former Citadel Plaza development site

The long-awaited cleanup of the failed Citadel Plaza development site near 63rd Street and Prospect Avenue is finally set to begin, at least in a small way.

Kansas City officials said test pit activity will begin Wednesday and continue for two to three weeks. It will take place on four to six lots out of the 68 vacant lots identified for possible buried asbestos. If contamination is found, it will be properly disposed of, they said.

Results of those tests will set the stage for a full environmental cleanup on the site later this year, said Andrew Bracker, the city’s brownfields coordinator. A brownfield is an area contaminated by industrial or commercial use.

“It is the start,” Bracker said of the process to address any buried asbestos at the former development site –– encompassing seven blocks –– so the city can try to market the location for another developer.

Citadel Plaza was envisioned as an $80 million, 35-acre shopping center with a grocery store, restaurants, other retailers and housing. But the developer, CDC-KC, failed to properly monitor asbestos removal before some homes were torn down in 2006, and the project collapsed in a mess of environmental and financial conflicts.

In November 2011, the Kansas City Council approved a $15 million settlement to resolve lawsuits involving the development’s creditors. That settlement, made final in January 2012, gave the city clear title to the land and freed the site for development.

But first the city has to make sure there is no more asbestos contamination, and that process has taken much longer than expected.

Consultants have taken samples from 154 properties and found only one parcel with detectible asbestos fibers in the soil surface. Subsoil contamination has been harder to determine.

Bracker said considerable research on more than 200 lots ruled out contamination on all but 68 vacant lots. The city had hoped to issue a cleanup contract in 2013, but that level of continuing uncertainty about the 68 lots could lead to expensive bids, Bracker said. So the city decided to proceed more slowly and do the test pits. Even getting that contract in place took longer than expected.

“We have not met our expectations with respect to the pace” of cleanup, Bracker acknowledged.

The city has a $500,000 federal grant for cleanup and some bond funds available, but Bracker said the city wants to conserve as much money as possible for work needed before development begins.

The test pits are in the 6100 blocks of Park Avenue and Olive Street. Bracker said the contractor will monitor air quality before and during the activity and will take necessary precautions to make sure no asbestos escapes into the air. Nearby residents will not be at risk and will have access to their homes.

Bracker said it should take 45 days to get and interpret the test pit results, and that will pave the way for a more complete cleanup, which he hopes can occur by this summer.

The city also commissioned a market study about potential development opportunities for the site, but the report released in May 2013 wasn’t overly encouraging. It saw no potential for a convenience/neighborhood-oriented shopping center, noting there are other struggling shopping complexes nearby.

The consultant’s report recommended trying to attract four or five regional traffic generators such as a Menards, Ross Dress for Less, Target and Michaels. City officials have said they intend to market the site aggressively, but that won’t until the cleanup is complete.

Original article:  

Asbestos cleanup set to begin at former Citadel Plaza development site

Asbestos Troubles Binghamton Schools, Florida Asbestos Testing Company AGC Environmental Reveals a Method to Avoid …

…its [AGC Environmental] techniques follow the Florida state guidelines.

New York, NY (PRWEB) December 13, 2013

Asbestos was found in several schools in Binghamton, New York. And knowing how dangerous it could be to people’s health, Florida asbestos testing company, AGC Environmental, shared a way how others could avoid its health risks.

In a report from wicz.com, which was posted on December 06, 2013, it was said that three Binghamton schools were particularly discovered to contain asbestos, AGC Environmental shared. Nonetheless, it relayed that the crawl spaces where it was found were already sealed and the classrooms were cleaned.

Specifically, the report related that the dangerous and fibrous mineral was found in the crawl spaces of West Middle School and Woodrow Wilson. It added that it was also found in a windowsill of a Theodore Roosevelt classroom, which was scheduled to reopen once test result turns clean.

Below is a part of the said report.

“The Binghamton School District has responded to the asbestos found in three of the city schools after letters were sent home to parents.

Assistant Superintendent Karry Mullins said the asbestos found in West Middle School and Woodrow Wilson were in crawl spaces which have since been sealed. ”

AGC Environmental said that exposure to asbestos fibers could cause serious illnesses as lung cancer. And so, it highly advised asbestos testing to buildings suspected to have it, especially to those constructed in the 70s.

If a structure is to be renovated, before the work, it also suggested that an asbestos inspection must be implemented on the place. That, it said, would help ensure the health of the workers and of the people who would be staying in it.

Nonetheless, for the best Florida asbestos testing, AGC Environmental asserted that its service is the one to get. And as it cited, that’s because its techniques follow the Florida state guidelines.

Moreover, the company added that it is had been known to work with lawyers to assess and offer expert opinions about asbestos exposure and asbestos health effects.

To learn more about AGC Environmental’s Florida asbestos training and other environmental services, readers could check its website at agcenvironmental.com.


Link: 

Asbestos Troubles Binghamton Schools, Florida Asbestos Testing Company AGC Environmental Reveals a Method to Avoid …

Asbestos fears in Williamstown

Asbestos fears in Williamstown
Asbestos fears in Williamstown

Williamstown residents say that their children are at risk due to the way Kalgoorlie Consolidated Gold Mines have handled the discovery of asbestos on four vacant lots on Brownhill Road.

The asbestos was discovered after City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder rangers ordered KCGM, in November, to clean up a number of fire hazards on the properties.

Contractors employed by the Super Pit operator have spent the past week working at the site, which has a large amount of visible asbestos lying around.

Williamstown resident Paul Harris said he was concerned for the welfare of his family and neighbours, as well as the workers being exposed to the deadly material.

“They are meant to be clearing a fire hazard, so they are taking precautions to deal with those risks, and not the risks associated with asbestos,” Mr Harris said. “There is nobody supervising this work and, as a result, it’s not being done properly.”

A KCGM spokesperson said work was halted on the site as soon as the presence of asbestos was brought to the company’s and the city’s attention.

Original source:

Asbestos fears in Williamstown