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September 18, 2018

Vivienne Westwood Tries To Give David Cameron Asbestos For Christmas

Fashion designer Vivienne Westwood has attempted to deliver asbestos as a Christmas present to David Cameron in a protest against fracking.

The 73-year-old, her son and a protester dressed as Santa Claus in a gas mask, turned up outside the gates of Downing Street with holding a clear box filled with the poisonous substance.

Westwood said she wanted to wish the PM a “merry fracking Christmas” but police did not allow the dubious gift to reach him.

vivienne westwood

Westwood with Santa

Westwood, who was also at Downing Street with her businessman son Joseph Corre, was campaigning about the alleged health risks linked to fracking, with the campaign Talk Fracking.

SEE ALSO:
That Vivienne Westwood ‘Eat Less’ Row Has Just Become Even More Awkward
Westwood Blogs: Big Ag – “Eat Less”

Malcolm McLaren, Corre’s father, died of cancer due to asbestos, and his mother Westwood warned that the controversial hydraulic fracturing technique used to extract oil and gas could become “the next asbestos or thalidomide”.

After the box of asbestos was rejected, Westwood and her son delivered “independent medical reports” on the consequences of fracking to the PM.

vivienne westwood

Westwood got to Downing Street – but the “present” wasn’t allowed in

vivienne westwood

Westwood warned fracking could become “the next asbestos or thalidomide”.

Asked if she expected the Prime Minister to listen to their message, Westwood said: “Will David Cameron listen to us? He lost a child, he must have some sympathy, and he’s not connecting the dots.”

“They link very clearly the chemicals used in fracking industry to some really horrible, serious illnesses,” 47-year-old Corre said.

“Birth defects in children, horrible cancers, skin diseases, rashes, nosebleeds, stunted growth, all kinds of things.

“We are lucky to have this information in advance from the terrible situation that his happening right now in the United States.

“We have the opportunity now, and I hope David Cameron takes it, to put an end to what could be something quite disastrous for the UK.

“David Cameron has no democratic mandate to be pushing this through on to the British people. This is something the entire country is going to start waking up to.”

The protest came after New York state governor Andrew Cuomo’s administration announced yesterday that it would ban fracking after a report concluded that it poses potential health risks.

Corre said that his inspiration for taking a stance against fracking was his father’s death from cancer aged 64.

“He died a really horrible death. It was quite something and I wouldn’t want to wish that on to anybody or anybody’s family.”

The protesters claimed that chief scientific adviser Professor Sir Mark Walport warned in his annual report that the Government has not given proper consideration to the potential health risks of fracking.

But Walport denied that the view that fracking could be the next asbestos or thalidomide should be attributed to him.
Rather, it was the view of another author, Andy Stirling, who contributed an evidence document to the annual report.

Sir Mark said: “With regard to fracking, the hydraulic fracturing of shale to obtain natural gas and oil, I fully endorse the report of the Royal Society and the Royal Academy of Engineering.

“Of course, methane is a fossil fuel, but as long as it is burned efficiently and fugitive emissions of methane gas are minimised, it is a less harmful fossil fuel than coal and oil, and is an important way-station on the global journey towards low-carbon energy.

“The scientific evidence is clear that any environmental or geological risks can be managed effectively in the UK as long as operational best practices are implemented and enforced through effective regulation.”

Downing Street declined to respond to Ms Westwood’s comments about Cameron’s son.

Westwood in No 10 asbestos protest

Fashion designer Vivienne Westwood attempted to deliver asbestos as a Christmas present to David Cameron – and told him to have sympathy because “he lost a child”.

The 73-year-old was at Downing Street with her businessman son Joseph Corre to campaign about the alleged health risks linked to fracking.

Mr Corre, whose impresario father Malcolm McLaren died of cancer due to asbestos, and his mother warned that the controversial hydraulic fracturing technique of extracting oil and gas could become “the next asbestos or thalidomide”.

They turned up outside the gates of Downing Street with another protester dressed as Santa Claus wearing a gas mask to deliver a box of asbestos – but police did not allow the “present” through.

Asked if she expected the Prime Minister to listen to their message, Ms Westwood said: “Will David Cameron listen to us? He lost a child, he must have some sympathy, and he’s not connecting the dots.”

Instead of the box of asbestos, Westwood and her son delivered “independent medical reports” on the consequences of fracking.

“They link very clearly the chemicals used in fracking industry to some really horrible, serious illnesses,” 47-year-old Mr Corre said.

“Birth defects in children, horrible cancers, skin diseases, rashes, nosebleeds, stunted growth, all kinds of things.

“We are lucky to have this information in advance from the terrible situation that his happening right now in the United States.

“We have the opportunity now, and I hope David Cameron takes it, to put an end to what could be something quite disastrous for the UK.

“David Cameron has no democratic mandate to be pushing this through on to the British people. This is something the entire country is going to start waking up to.”

The protest came after New York state governor Andrew Cuomo’s administration announced yesterday that it would ban fracking after a report concluded that it poses potential health risks.

Mr Corre said that his inspiration for taking a stance against fracking was his father’s death from cancer aged 64.

“He died a really horrible death. It was quite something and I wouldn’t want to wish that on to anybody or anybody’s family.”

The protesters claimed that chief scientific adviser Professor Sir Mark Walport warned in his annual report that the Government has not given proper consideration to the potential health risks of fracking.

But Sir Mark denied that the view that fracking could be the next asbestos or thalidomide should be attributed to him.

Rather, it was the view of another author, Andy Stirling, who contributed an evidence document to the annual report.

Sir Mark said: “With regard to fracking, the hydraulic fracturing of shale to obtain natural gas and oil, I fully endorse the report of the Royal Society and the Royal Academy of Engineering.

“Of course, methane is a fossil fuel, but as long as it is burned efficiently and fugitive emissions of methane gas are minimised, it is a less harmful fossil fuel than coal and oil, and is an important way-station on the global journey towards low-carbon energy.

“The scientific evidence is clear that any environmental or geological risks can be managed effectively in the UK as long as operational best practices are implemented and enforced through effective regulation.”

Downing Street declined to respond to Ms Westwood’s comments about Mr Cameron’s son.

Original article:  

Westwood in No 10 asbestos protest

Decontamination ordered after botched asbestos job in Winnipeg home

The province has ordered two local companies to decontaminate a house after a botched asbestos-removal job forced a family from their Winnipeg home.

A Winnipeg family hired Sarte Heating and Cooling to replace the old boiler system in her Point Douglas home but was told the company couldn’t do the old work until the old boiler, which was covered in asbestos, was taken out.

So Sarte arranged for Workman Industries to do asbestos remediation in the home, but when workers showed up, they weren’t wearing safety gear and were carting open asbestos through the home.

“There was open bags of asbestos. There was an air filtration machine running but with the hose running out to nowhere basically,” said Jon Cameron, who lives in the home, “The window was not open, so it was more like for show.”

Workplace Safety and Health had issued a stop-work order against Workman Industries and Sarte Heating and Cooling after the Cameron family filed a complaint.

Now, Workplace Safety and Health has gone further.

Chief Occupational Medical Officer Richard Rusk said Workman Industries must decontaminate the house.

“They claim to be able to do that. They’ve also demonstrated that they have not done it correctly, so we would inspect to make sure the abatement is done correctly,” said Rusk.

The province’s stop-work order dated Aug. 12 cites five violations, ranging from releasing asbestos particles into the air, failing to give notice of an asbestos removal project and failing to train and equip employees handling the asbestos.

Such violations can run a fine of $2,500.

Rusk said anyone who lives in an older house should be aware of the risks.

“In the older houses, houses older than 1990, definitely older than 1980, most likely have a fair amount of asbestos in them,” said Rusk. “That’s a lot of houses in Winnipeg, and people need to be aware that if you’re going in to do renovations or into the ceiling or changing boilers and heating pipes, the likelihood of that being contained by asbestos is high.”

Rusk said homeowners put themselves at risk if the work isn’t carried out properly.

Right now, the home isn’t fit for the Cameron family to live in, and they’ve been forced out until the work can be completed.

Rusk said because the department’s mandate is to look after workers, they can’t help them.

Instead, Rusk said, “The family unfortunately has to go to their lawyers or talk to consumer affairs.”

He said it’s unfortunate, but with work like this, “in some ways, it’s buyer beware.”

Link – 

Decontamination ordered after botched asbestos job in Winnipeg home

Winnipeg family left homeless after botched asbestos job

A Winnipeg family is homeless after a botched asbestos remediation in their Point Douglas home. 

The company that did the remediation, Workman Industries, has been issued a cease and desist order to stop using the logo of a national certification body on its website. 

“There was open bags of asbestos. There was an air filtration machine running but with the hose running out to nowhere basically,” said Jon Cameron, the homeowners’ son.  “The window was not open, so it was more like for show.”

The Point Douglas home on Austin Street has been owned by Cameron’s parents, Rafaelita and Victor Cameron, for 37 years.  They live there along with their daughter, Cherielyn Yabas, her husband and their one month old daughter, Saffiya. 

“[I’m] scared for all of us, especially for her,” said Cerielyn, looking down at her infant daughter. “She’s so young.”

Rafaelita Cameron had hired Sarte Heating and Cooling to replace the old boiler system with a new high efficiency furnace, but the company could not do the installation until the old boiler, which was covered in asbestos, was removed. 

So Sarte arranged for Workman Industries to go to the Point Douglas home on Aug. 7 to do the remediation. 

Undisturbed asbestos-containing materials generally don’t pose a health risk, according to Health Canada and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

It’s only when the asbestos is disturbed, and the dust is emitted into the air that it poses a risk to human health, the agencies say.  In significant quantities, asbestos fibres can cause asbestosis and lung cancer.

“I never talked to [Workman] before [the work started],” said Rafaelita Cameron.

Family notices ‘red flags’

When the crew arrived, Rafaelita and her daughter noticed red flags. 

They said the workers were not wearing protective equipment or masks.

Rafaelita, Yabas and her one-month-old daughter, Saffiya, were all in and out of the home as they were not instructed to stay away. 

They eventually realized there were no barriers created to separate the basement job site from the remainder of the home.  Rafaelita said she confronted one of the workers.

“I said ‘Where’s the barrier? How come there’s no barrier?” she said. 

That’s when she contacted her son, Jon Cameron, to step in. 

Cameron video-taped the company as they removed the old asbestos covered boiler in pieces without wrapping any of it in plastic. 

“Pretty much just bare-handing these materials from the basement.  I didn’t notice any masks,” said Jon Cameron. “These guys were wearing T-shirts and shorts and jeans. There was nothing to indicate they were taking precautions in handling asbestos.”

Jon Cameron contacted the province. 

Workplace Safety and Health issues stop-work order

The next morning, Workplace Safety and Health issued stop-work orders against Workman Industries and Sarte Heating and Cooling for a botched asbestos remediation. 

The orders says “Asbestos containing material is being released into the atmosphere at this project site,” and measures used to control asbestos were not used. 

The family said the agency photographed open bags of asbestos still in the basement and told them their home and its contents are contaminated, so they should not be there.

“It was very shocking,” said Jon Cameron, “I was scared and was very angry because this is my family, and they mean everything to me.  There’s no reason for endangering people’s lives.”

CBC News contacted Sarte Heating and Cooling. 

The owner, Lito Mendoza, said his heart goes out to the family, but Workman Industries should be responsible for the clean-up. 

When asked why he arranged for Workman Industries to do the work, he said he has only had one previous job with Workman and the air quality tests done after the fact came back with good results. 

Mendoza said his company has not taken a deposit from the homeowners at this time and said he has offered to pay $500.00 towards their accommodations while they are displaced. 

Construction safety association issues cease and desist order

CBC News tried to contact Workman Industries without success. 

The address listed on its web page is the location where the owner picks up his mail. 

Workman’s website shows a Certificate of Recognition (COR) Program logo, certification which is typically obtained through the Construction Safety Association of Manitoba. 

Typically, the logo means a company has a safety and health program that meets national standards. 

However, when CBC News contacted the association, it said Workman Industries has never been certified by them. 

The association sent Workman Industries a cease and desist letter yesterday, ordering them to stop improperly using the logo. 

The association said the company did attend some classes in 2010 but has never completed the program. 

Family wants home back

Meanwhile, Cherielyn Yabas and her family just want their home and their lives back. 

“We have nothing.  Everything’s in that house,” said Yabas, “It’s our home.  We just want to go home.”

Jon Cameron said he wants a certified company to do the work. 

“It needs to be cleaned.  It needs to be approved by a trustworthy company,” Cameron said.

“My parents need their home back. My sister and brother-in-law and their one-month-old baby need their home back,” he said. “It’s a horrible feeling to be displaced.  It’s a horrible feeling to know your family is without a home and because of no fault of their own — simply because they put their trust in so-called professionals that this would be done properly.”

Read the article:

Winnipeg family left homeless after botched asbestos job