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October 20, 2018

Landfill facing asbestos concerns during storm repairs in Madison County

Canastota (WSYR-TV) – The ruins of a former antique store and a karate business have been piled in a heap in Oneida since early July. The biggest obstacle to getting it cleaned up appears to be money.

“They have to truck it all the way out to Seneca Falls. That’s the nearest dump that allows it from our area,” said Heath Waterman, who owns part of the property.

He has a contractor lined up to haul away his portion of the rubble, once he has the money saved to pay for the trip.

“The fact is that we do not accept friable asbestos in the Madison County landfill,” explained Madison County Department of Solid Waste and Sanitation Director James Zecca.

Too small to handle that type of waste, the Madison County landfill is getting swamped with calls from homeowners wondering what to do with materials containing asbestos.

“With all of the storms that we’ve been having, unfortunately people’s homes have been damaged and they are doing some major renovations, and in worse case scenarios it is complete demolition of their homes,” Zecca said.

The landfill director is hoping to educate property owners about the rules. Zecca recommends a survey by state certified inspectors before any renovation work begins, identifying areas for removing friable or non-friable asbestos separately.

Zecca says powdery friable asbestos, often found on pipe insulation and various building materials, can cost up to $200 a ton to unload in other landfills. However, non-friable asbestos on floor tiles or roof shingles, among other things, is accepted at the Madison County landfill, for far less money.

An inspector will help property owners determine the difference before they start tearing a room apart, so they can contain removal of friable asbestos separately, minimizing trips to other landfills.

“Once the building is down, there is no way of identifying where the asbestos is located. So, what the state does is, they step in and say all of the debris, the total house now is considered contaminated with friable asbestos.”

There’s no proof that Waterman’s building contained friable asbestos. But, there’s also no proof it did not contain the waste. He didn’t have an updated asbestos report on record when the City of Oneida ordered an emergency demolition after the wall collapsed.

Now, as a precaution, all of the rubble is classified as possibly containing friable asbestos.

Without the money to transport the debris at the higher rate of disposal, Waterman has a mess that he hopes others can avoid.

“You’d think for something so dangerous they would have more dumps available, so you wouldn’t have to truck it two hours one way,” Waterman said.

Zecca recommends that homeowners hire professionals to handle asbestos.

Residents looking for more information about disposal can call the Madison County Recycling Hotline at 1-800-721-2208 or click here to find details online.

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Landfill facing asbestos concerns during storm repairs in Madison County

Asbestos removal clears the way for use of old fire hall

The old fire hall has been cleared of asbestos and is ready for a tenant to take it over.

“The asbestos at the fire hall has been dealt with,” CAO Wayne Staudt said at the Sept. 15 council meeting. “So we have got a report from the consultant firm that oversaw the work.”

Staudt said that meant the building is now ready for any kind of construction work or a tenant.

While a Memorandum of Understand has been signed between the City of Cranbrook and the Cranbrook and District Arts Council, CAO Wayne Staudt confirmed that there are still “no definite plans for any group to move into the old fire hall at this time.”

At the end of August the city received a project closure report from Peak Environment Ltd, the professional consultant hired to oversee the project including the monitoring and inspecting services.

Peak Environment Ltd has certified that the building can be reoccupied without concerns regarding possible asbestos exposure.

Napp Enterprises was selected to perform the removal of hazardous and regulated materials.

The work was performed in accordance with WorkSafe BC’s Occupational Health and Safety Regulations regarding asbestos and other hazardous materials.

The project is reported to be coming in under budget, with the project expected to come in at $110,000. The initial budget was $130,000.

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Asbestos removal clears the way for use of old fire hall

Mr Fluffy homes can be demolished safely, asbestos taskforce head Andrew Kefford says

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“It is possible to demolish a house with loose-fill asbestos safely and without there being a risk to neighbouring property,” he said. “It’s an area of work which is very heavily regulated and at the point where the houses are actually being knocked over, either the lose-fill asbestos has been removed or it has been bonded to the structures so the prospect of the fibres escaping is being controlled.”

He pointed to a demolition of a Fluffy house in Woden in July, where he said asbestos removalists had worked for a fortnight before the building was knocked over to remove the remaining fibres and glue the rest to the structure, so by the time it was knocked over it was safe. Dust-suppression measures would be in place during demolition, along with air monitoring.

“The whole thing is designed so at the point it is actually knocked over, the fibres are controlled and there is active dust suppression and active air monitoring to make sure that it’s working,” he said.

With the Woden home, the internal walls were removed so the remaining fibres could be taken out before demolition, but the taskforce has been considering how to handle double-brick houses, where the load-bearing wall is on the inside, so the outside wall must come off first to clean asbestos from the wall cavities. Mr Kefford confirmed some would have to be “bubble wrapped” – effectively enclosed in a tent – but for others, it would be safe to use technologies such as foam products, glue and water suppression to prevent fibres escaping.

“It is possible to demolish a double-brick house safely and not necessarily by putting it in a bubble,” he said. “It is something we are continuing to explore, but all of the advice we’re getting from the industry is it can be done safely.”

Each house would be assessed separately and have a demolition plan in place.

“If the advice is this house needs a bubble because it’s so bad, then there will be a bubble.”

Asked about an exclusion zone around houses, he said “the bloke standing on site spraying dust suppression might wear a suit”, but “the whole process is designed from beginning to end to prevent fibres from escaping”.

Once the house was down, 10 centimetres of soil would be removed from under the footprint of the house and a little wider, then the soil would be tested. If it showed asbestos fibres, “you keep digging and then you test again”.

“This is a heavily regulated process. At the point that the asbestos assessor is prepared to sign off that the site is clean, they stop digging.”

In the Downer demolition last year, 30 centimetres of soil had been removed. In Woden, testing had been clear after 10 centimetres.

“You need to be in a position to say this block has been remediated, which means we tested, we didn’t find anything, we replaced the dirt to ground level with clean fill and this block is now remediated,” he said.

“We’re getting a lot of questions about this, but the point is it can be done safely. It is a very tightly regulated space and at the end of that process it is possible to say that it’s been done properly and safely.”

The government is considering a buyback and demolition of the 1000 homes.











Credit:  

Mr Fluffy homes can be demolished safely, asbestos taskforce head Andrew Kefford says

Boulder City bypass gets green light after asbestos testing shows no threat

Image

Nevada Department of Transportation

This artist’s rendering shows what the redesigned interchange of Boulder City Bypass and U.S. 93 would look like at Railroad Pass. Railroad Pass Casino is at left. If U.S. 93 is designated an interstate between Las Vegas and Phoenix, the bypass route would become part of the interstate, officials say.

Click to enlarge photo

This Nevada Department of Transportation graphic shows the route of the proposed Boulder City Bypass.

After a frustrating seven-month delay to allow for hundreds of tests of asbestos-tainted soil, construction of a bypass highway around Boulder City is back on track.

Officials with the Nevada Department of Transportation and the Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada gave the green light after concluding workers could safely cut the highway through the hills around Boulder City because the asbestos, discovered by UNLV geologists in 2011, did not reach harmful levels. Construction is slated to begin in the spring, officials said today.

Asbestos, in strong enough concentrations, can trigger respiratory problems including scarred lungs and, in extreme cases, cancer.

To play it safe, construction zones will be heavily watered to prevent asbestos from becoming airborne and exposing workers. Additionally, there will be continued soil testing and real-time air sampling and, if exposure levels become unacceptable, contactors can halt work and launch additional mitigation, NDOT Project Manager Tony Lorenzi said.

The news “is a relief to everyone,” said Boulder City Mayor Roger Tober. “While initially the asbestos discovery caused alarm, this is just good news. For the levels that are there, there will be some mitigation, but it’s going to be taken care of.”

The $490 million highway project, more than 10 years in the making, would wend around Boulder City so traffic can move smoothly between Las Vegas and Arizona. Until the bypass is built, tourists, truckers and commuters must use U.S. 93, which slices into town where traffic slows miserably on busy days.

The bypass is envisioned as the first link in Interstate 11, a proposed interstate highway connecting Phoenix and Las Vegas.

Testing conducted over the summer confirmed the presence of asbestos but concluded it was not at a threatening level.

The project will be conducted in two phases by NDOT and the RTC. Each agency conducted its own tests to meet their respective regulations.

“Phase 1 is what we are calling clean,” Project Manager Tony Lorenzi said.

The first phase, a 2.5-mile connector starting at U.S. 95 and heading easterly toward the Colorado River, is NDOT”s responsibility. Tests of 150 soil samples showed no asbestos concentrations higher than 0.25 percent, deeming them safe. The second phase — RTC’s 12.5-mile stretch that finishes the bypass to the east — involved testing of 461 samples for concentrations less than 1 percent. Fourteen samples tested above 1 percent.

These concentrations are standard for construction sites where there’s naturally occurring asbestos.

“The most important thing is the comfort of the public,” Lorenzi said. “We want them to know that construction will be done safely, in compliance with every agency. We’re doing it right.”

The asbestos findings will be discussed at an open house from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Elaine K. Smith Center Building, 700 Wyoming St., Boulder City. Representatives from Boulder City, the Boulder City Chamber of Commerce, NDOT and the RTC will be there to discuss the project.

From:

Boulder City bypass gets green light after asbestos testing shows no threat

Council to give DIY advice on 'safe' home asbestos removal


Council to give asbestos DIY advice


LOIS CAIRNS

Last updated 05:00 04/08/2014

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Do-it-yourself homeowners will be targeted by a new campaign aimed at encouraging the safe removal of building materials containing asbestos.

Christchurch City Council inspections and enforcement unit manager Anne Columbus said that in the past authorities had been reluctant to provide information to homeowners on how to safely remove asbestos because they did not want to encourage them to remove it themselves, but this was happening anyway because it was expensive to get professionals to remove it.

The joint agency Waste and Environmental Management Team (Wemt) set up to manage the mountain of waste generated by the quakes had now decided to change tack and were in the process of pulling together information for homeowners on how they could manage their own asbestos removal.

“The message now is if you are going to do it, do it the right way and do the right thing,” Columbus told the council’s environment committee.

She said a new dedicated website would go live where DIY people would be able to get detailed advice on how to remove asbestos safely and how to dispose of it. It was part of a new community education campaign supported by Worksafe New Zealand and the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority.

Cr David East said the problem was not just disposing of asbestos in building materials, but also disposing of soil contaminated with asbestos.

On the former Queen Elizabeth II site, for example, there were three or four large piles of asbestos-contaminated soil. Although it technically posed little risk to the community, there was a perception among nearby residents that it could pose a health hazard.

“What is the longer-term strategy for getting rid of contaminated soil? There must be thousands of cubic metres of it?” East said.

Environment Canterbury programme manager Don Chittock acknowledged the disposal of contaminated soil was an issue and said solutions were being sought.

“We have a meeting tomorrow with Transwaste [which operates the Kate Valley landfill] to discuss disposal options . . . we’re working with the industry to provide solutions,” Chittock said.

The environment committee decided to ask for more information on the removal and disposal of asbestos-contaminated soil. It also voted unanimously to ask the council to write to the minister of building innovation and employment in support of a ban on the importation of materials containing asbestos.


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Council to give DIY advice on 'safe' home asbestos removal

Asbestos scare shuts Perth's biggest school

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Mr Axworthy said he recieved a call from the school and that he elected to take a cautious approach.

“Parents were notified by an SMS at 6pm on Monday night saying the school would be closed on Tuesday, with more information to come,” he said

“That information was emailed to parents at 9pm.”

However the school will now be closed until Monday, with staff from The Department of Finance’s building management and works division, along with expert contractors, spending the rest of the week inspecting the school.

Mr Axworthy said there was no indication more asbestos would be found at the school and that the closure was a precaution.

“They will conduct comprehensive testing within the school so we can assure ourselves there is no risk or danger to any students or staff, so the school will be closed until Monday.

“We have contacted all parents.”

Mr Axworthy said Willetton’s 260 Year 12 students, along with upper school students, would not be disadvantaged

Their teachers will be relocated to North Lake Primary School for the duration of the week, and would work with the students using WIlletton’s already well-developed online learning system.

“Willetton has a very strong online connection….we’ve moved the teachers to another site and they will be able to connect directly with the families and the individual students to maintain and moniter educational programs and assignments.”

He added that the school would definitely be reopening on Monday.

However Mr Axworthy pointed his finger squarely at the Department of Finance’s building management and works division when asked if he was concerned the Education Department wasn’t aware of Friday’s asbestos discovery.

“Our staff are not in the school during the school holidays.

“Building management and works had reported nothing to us…I am not at all happy that I was informed at 5pm last night that our biggest high school has a potential problem

“We are certainly taking it up with building managment and works.”

An Education Department spokeswoman confirmed that 600 WA schools have asbestos-containing material on site, which was commonly used in buildings before the 1990s.

” All Western Australian public schools have at their premises, a site-specific asbestos register that forms an integral part of the Department’s Asbestos Management Plan,” the spokeswoman said.

“This register documents the location and condition of all known and suspected ACM, identified through visual inspection and includes details of major ACM removal.

“Asbestos registers in schools are updated every two to three years as part of the Building Condition Assessment process.

“The Western Australian Advisory Committee on Hazardous Substances Report in August 1990 indicated that exposure to asbestos cement materials in WA public schools represented negligible risk to health.

“The Department of Education’s position on ACM in WA public schools is that the material, if in relatively good condition and left undisturbed, presents negligible risk to the health of building occupants.”

She also confirmed that in the last financial year, the Education Department has spend $2 million on repairs and maintenance associated with ACM.

WA Opposition Leader Mark McGowan said the state government and the education department should have inspected buildings earlier in the school break.

“Students have been arriving and journalists have been telling them to go home,” Mr McGowan said.

“It’s clearly unacceptable, although I can’t say the students appeared unhappy.”

Willetton Senior High School has more than 1800 students.

It was built during the 1970s and is now the subject of a multi-million dollar redevelopment.

– with AAP











Read original article:  

Asbestos scare shuts Perth's biggest school

Parts of US Capitol closed after asbestos accident

WASHINGTON (AP) — An accident involving asbestos work forced a temporary closure of the House side of the Capitol on Thursday and prompted House leaders to delay the day’s session for two hours.

No injuries were reported. The incident occurred around 2:30 a.m. or 3 a.m., Capitol Police said.

A handful of workers were removing insulation containing asbestos from around pipes and valves on the building’s fourth floor, above a staircase, said a congressional official who was not authorized to discuss the matter by name and spoke on condition of anonymity.

On-site samples and another sample analyzed by an outside lab revealed low enough asbestos levels that officials decided the building was safe to reopen, the official said. Those samples revealed levels similar to what is found in typical buildings in Washington, said the official, who did not provide any figures.

By midmorning, most of the building had reopened and Capitol tours on the House side had resumed. The Senate, at the other end of the 751-foot-long building, seemed unaffected by the incident.

The East Grand Staircase, which runs from the first floor to the third floor inside the House side of the building, was blocked off and more than a dozen workers and officials spent much of the day examining the area. Also closed was the Thomas P. O’Neill Jr. Room, a third-floor room near that staircase that was named for the late speaker and Massachusetts Democrat.

The House began the day’s session at noon instead of 10 a.m. because of “an industrial accident,” according to a statement from House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio. Even so, by midmorning a handful of tourists was sitting in the visitors’ gallery, observing an otherwise empty chamber.

The Senate began its session as scheduled at 10 a.m.

The office of the architect of the Capitol said in a statement that engineers and certified industrial hygienists had decided the building was safe to reopen and that the staircase would remain closed indefinitely.

Construction of the main, center section of the Capitol began in 1793 and was finished in 1826.

As the country grew and more lawmakers joined Congress, a south wing for the current House chamber and a north wing for the Senate were built. Both were completed in 1868, along with a new, larger dome.

The architect’s office has been repairing decaying plaster throughout the building. It has also started preparations for a project to repair the 8.9 million pound, cast iron dome.

___

Associated Press writer Donna Cassata contributed to this report.

Originally from – 

Parts of US Capitol closed after asbestos accident

Part of U.S. Capitol closed to probe asbestos incident: officials

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Parts of the U.S. Capitol were closed early on Thursday while authorities investigated a possible asbestos release, delaying the start of the House of Representatives session and canceling some tours of the building.

U.S. Capitol Police said an “industrial spill” had occurred. Later, a spokeswoman for the Architect of the Capitol said there was a potential release during ongoing asbestos removal on the House side of the Capitol.

Spokeswoman Laura Condeluci said samples were being collected to determine if there was potential harmful exposure in the incident that occurred overnight.

House Republican leadership aides said the House chamber will open, but it will come into session at noon, two hours later than planned. The delay will not have an impact on any House votes, according to the aide.

The House is scheduled to debate a bill to fund Department of Energy programs for next year.

(Reporting By Richard Cowan; Editing by Doina Chiacu)

Originally posted here – 

Part of U.S. Capitol closed to probe asbestos incident: officials

Flats asbestos evacuation extended

More than 100 residents who were moved out of a block of flats when asbestos was disturbed by maintenance workers will remain out of their homes over the weekend.

North Lanarkshire Council moved all tenants from Anderson Tower in Motherwell as a precautionary measure after concerns were raised yesterday.

The substance is thought to have been disturbed during mains cabling replacement work which was being carried out at the tower by ScottishPower.

The council said it ensured all tenants were accommodated overnight, with some in hotels, a number in temporary council accommodation and others staying with friends and family.

Some asbestos dust has been found in halls and lobbies, with c lean-up work starting yesterday and continuing to Monday. Residents are unable to return until then.

The council’s housing operations manager, Stephen Llewelyn, said: “Tests have shown small amounts of asbestos dust in hall and hall cupboards as well as lift lobbies and one lift.

As a precautionary measure the contractor has been instructed to clean all halls and communal areas.

“Tenants will not be able to return to the building until we are satisfied that this is complete.

“We are confident that any risk is extremely low. Asbestos generally poses a health risk through exposure over a long period in high concentrations. What we have found is small areas of settled dust.

“We are working closely with ScottishPower, their contractors and the Health and Safety Executive to ensure all safety standards are met.”

Mr Llewelyn added that residents ” fully appreciate” the efforts of council staff.

“We are very grateful to both the residents and their families for their support,” he said.

“Emptying a block of flats within the timescale was no easy task and we are pleased that, working with the tenants and their families, this was a textbook operation.”

Visit source: 

Flats asbestos evacuation extended

Asbestos fine for school governors

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Asbestos fine for school governors