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July 17, 2018

Asbestos remnants being removed from school remains


Asbestos remnants being removed from school remains


Last updated 05:00 13/01/2015

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Contractors are removing asbestos “crumbs” found in the remains of Aranui High School buildings demolished about four years ago.

Three buildings demolished at the school in 2010 as part of scheduled upgrades were removed but “some crumbs of materials remained buried and undisturbed”, Ministry of Education head of education infrastructure Rob Campbell said.

Surface materials were removed and the area isolated and the ministry engaged an expert consultant to investigate how to remove buried fragments.

The removal would be done before school reopened this year, he said.

“We have been advised that the risk to students or staff is minimal, as the materials which contained asbestos was buried undisturbed under the soil.”

Strict processes for managing asbestos would be carried out during any development, Campbell said.

Aranui High and community campus establishment board chairwoman Haneta Pierce said plans initially involved moving the original Maori whare from the high school onto the new site.

“Because of the asbestos, we can’t do that,” she said.

Aranui High principal John Rohs said the whare had a lot of cultural significance for the community and had been on the grounds for more than 30 years.

It had “a lot of asbestos in it which took us by surprise”, he said.

Original plans were to gift it to the new campus and Rohs was “deeply disappointed” it was no longer feasible.


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– The Press


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Asbestos remnants being removed from school remains

Asbestos remnants being removed from Aranui High School remants


Asbestos remnants being removed from school remains


Last updated 05:00 13/01/2015

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Contractors are removing asbestos “crumbs” found in the remains of Aranui High School buildings demolished about four years ago.

Three buildings demolished at the school in 2010 as part of scheduled upgrades were removed but “some crumbs of materials remained buried and undisturbed”, Ministry of Education head of education infrastructure Rob Campbell said.

Surface materials were removed and the area isolated and the ministry engaged an expert consultant to investigate how to remove buried fragments.

The removal would be done before school reopened this year, he said.

“We have been advised that the risk to students or staff is minimal, as the materials which contained asbestos was buried undisturbed under the soil.”

Strict processes for managing asbestos would be carried out during any development, Campbell said.

Aranui High and community campus establishment board chairwoman Haneta Pierce said plans initially involved moving the original Maori whare from the high school onto the new site.

“Because of the asbestos, we can’t do that,” she said.

Aranui High principal John Rohs said the whare had a lot of cultural significance for the community and had been on the grounds for more than 30 years.

It had “a lot of asbestos in it which took us by surprise”, he said.

Original plans were to gift it to the new campus and Rohs was “deeply disappointed” it was no longer feasible.


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– The Press


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Asbestos remnants being removed from Aranui High School remants

Study of Montana Mining Town Says Cleanup Working

A long-delayed risk study released Monday for a Montana mining town where hundreds of people have died from asbestos poisoning concludes cleanup practices now in place are reducing risks to residents.

However, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency acknowledged there is no way to remove all the asbestos from the area and inhaling even a minute amount could cause lung problems.

The 328-page draft document will be used to guide the remaining cleanup of asbestos dust stemming from a W.R. Grace & Co. vermiculite mine outside Libby, a town of 2,600 people about 50 miles south of the Canada border.

The scenic mountain community has become synonymous with asbestos dangers. Health workers estimate 400 people have been killed and more than 2,000 sickened in Libby and the surrounding area.

Dozens of sites across the U.S. received or processed vermiculite from Libby’s mine, which was used as insulation in millions of homes.

The EPA study used lung scarring ? not just cancer deaths ? to help determine how much danger asbestos poses to people who remain in Libby, where the contaminated vermiculite had been widely used in homes, as construction fill, and for other purposes before its dangers were known.

The EPA already has conducted cleanup work on more than 2,000 homes, businesses and other properties in the Libby area at a cost of roughly $500 million.

Concentrations of asbestos in the air around town is now 100,000 times lower than when the mine was operating from 1963 to 1990, the EPA said.

Those levels could be higher at the mine site ? where cleanup work has barely started ? and in areas where property owners have not given access to EPA contractors, the agency said.

“Where EPA has conducted cleanup, those cleanups are effective,” said Rebecca Thomas, EPA project manager in Libby.

She added that there will be some residual contamination left behind but only in places where officials determine there’s no threat of human exposure.

“As long as no one’s exposed to it, it doesn’t pose a risk and we’ll leave it in place,” Thomas said.

W.R. Grace and industry groups have criticized the EPA’s low threshold for exposure as unjustified and impossible to attain. They said the EPA limit was lower than naturally occurring asbestos levels in some places.

The criticism was one of the factors that delayed the risk study. In a report last year, the EPA’s inspector general said internal agency issues including contracting problems and unanticipated work also contributed to the delay.

W.R. Grace was “pleased to see EPA believes it has effectively managed the health risk to acceptable levels,” said Rich Badmington, a spokesman for the Columbia, Maryland-based chemical company

Still, the company believes the EPA’s threshold for exposure is too low, he said.

The town remains under a first-of-its kind public health emergency declaration issued by former EPA administrator Lisa Jackson in 2009.

Cleanup work is pending for as many as 500 homes and businesses in Libby and nearby Troy. Completing that work will take three to five years, Thomas said.

Because of the long latency period for asbestos-related diseases, it could be many years before some people in Libby develop medical complications.

Libby Mayor Doug Roll said moving forward with the study was critical for the tourism- and mining-dependent town. Roll said Libby wants to overcome its image of a poisoned community.

“Grace was the stumbling block, trying to put a bunch of their input into it,” Roll said. “We’re trying to get out from underneath this cloud and start promoting Libby as a place you can come and visit ? and not worry about the air quality.”

Original article:

Study of Montana Mining Town Says Cleanup Working

Landfill facing asbestos concerns during storm repairs in Madison County

Canastota (WSYR-TV) – The ruins of a former antique store and a karate business have been piled in a heap in Oneida since early July. The biggest obstacle to getting it cleaned up appears to be money.

“They have to truck it all the way out to Seneca Falls. That’s the nearest dump that allows it from our area,” said Heath Waterman, who owns part of the property.

He has a contractor lined up to haul away his portion of the rubble, once he has the money saved to pay for the trip.

“The fact is that we do not accept friable asbestos in the Madison County landfill,” explained Madison County Department of Solid Waste and Sanitation Director James Zecca.

Too small to handle that type of waste, the Madison County landfill is getting swamped with calls from homeowners wondering what to do with materials containing asbestos.

“With all of the storms that we’ve been having, unfortunately people’s homes have been damaged and they are doing some major renovations, and in worse case scenarios it is complete demolition of their homes,” Zecca said.

The landfill director is hoping to educate property owners about the rules. Zecca recommends a survey by state certified inspectors before any renovation work begins, identifying areas for removing friable or non-friable asbestos separately.

Zecca says powdery friable asbestos, often found on pipe insulation and various building materials, can cost up to $200 a ton to unload in other landfills. However, non-friable asbestos on floor tiles or roof shingles, among other things, is accepted at the Madison County landfill, for far less money.

An inspector will help property owners determine the difference before they start tearing a room apart, so they can contain removal of friable asbestos separately, minimizing trips to other landfills.

“Once the building is down, there is no way of identifying where the asbestos is located. So, what the state does is, they step in and say all of the debris, the total house now is considered contaminated with friable asbestos.”

There’s no proof that Waterman’s building contained friable asbestos. But, there’s also no proof it did not contain the waste. He didn’t have an updated asbestos report on record when the City of Oneida ordered an emergency demolition after the wall collapsed.

Now, as a precaution, all of the rubble is classified as possibly containing friable asbestos.

Without the money to transport the debris at the higher rate of disposal, Waterman has a mess that he hopes others can avoid.

“You’d think for something so dangerous they would have more dumps available, so you wouldn’t have to truck it two hours one way,” Waterman said.

Zecca recommends that homeowners hire professionals to handle asbestos.

Residents looking for more information about disposal can call the Madison County Recycling Hotline at 1-800-721-2208 or click here to find details online.

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Landfill facing asbestos concerns during storm repairs in Madison County

No airborne asbestos: police

Asbestos risk in Rozelle very low, say Police

NSW

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Police frustrated as delays cause further chaos

NSW Police have advised that the risk of asbestos exposure at the site of the Rozelle explosion is very low. ;

An accredited hygienist found no evidence of airborne asbestos in the area on Saturday.

However, some asbestos remains within the buildings affected by the fire.

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No airborne asbestos: police

Asbestos risk in Rozelle very low, say Police

Asbestos risk in Rozelle very low, say Police

NSW

Date

Police frustrated as delays cause further chaos

NSW Police have advised that the risk of asbestos exposure at the site of the Rozelle explosion is very low. ;

An accredited hygienist found no evidence of airborne asbestos in the area on Saturday.

However, some asbestos remains within the buildings affected by the fire.

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Asbestos risk in Rozelle very low, say Police

Asbestos found on board third naval vessel

An asbestos clean-up has begun on a third Naval Service vessel after the potentially lethal substance was found on board last Saturday.

The LÉ Eithne was brought into the Naval Service’s headquarters at Haulbowline for routine maintenance when a worker spotted asbestos in the fuel area of the vessel’s former helicopter landing pad. She is the third ship of the eight-vessel fleet on which the substance has been found. Two others had to be put into lock-down as a result.

A Defence Forces spokesman said of the latest discovery: “The compartment [in which the asbestos was discovered] was immediately sealed. The LÉ Eithne is not subject to a lock-down. The hazard has been contained and the vessel is undergoing a full environmental clean by an external licensed contractor concurrent to routine maintenance.”

The LÉ Ciara and LÉ Orla have both been out of commission for several months since asbestos was discovered on them.

The clean-up is being undertaken in conjunction with the Health and Safety Association and began on May 28. The Naval Service is unable to say when it will be completed.

It is the second time that asbestos has been identified on the LÉ Eithne, which was built at Verolme Dockyard in 1984.

The vessel used to carry a SA365f Dauphin helicopter on a flight deck. The latest asbestos find was made in this area.

The ship’s helicopter operations stopped a few years ago, due to the purchase of CASA CN235-100MP Persuader Maritime Patrol Aircraft, and the decommissioning of the Dauphin helicopters. Asbestos was also found in a gasket in one of LÉ Aoife’s engines.

A week ago, the Naval Service confirmed it had begun a fleet-wide survey.

While it is not believed that the substance is onboard any of its newer vessels, they will also be surveyed as a precaution.

Inhaling asbestos dust can be potentially lethal and the symptoms can take up to 40 years to manifest themselves. A total of 116 Naval Service personnel and civilian workers are so far understood to have come in contact with asbestos on board the ships or in workshop sheds at the Naval Service’s headquarters on Haulbowline Island. They have been medically screened.

© Irish Examiner Ltd. All rights reserved

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Asbestos found on board third naval vessel

Loose asbestos home insulation fears

Deadly loose asbestos present in a large number of houses in Canberra may also be in some south-west homes.

The Canberra-based Mr Fluffy company insulated about 1000 homes in the national capital with the product in the 1960s and ’70s. It was applied by blowing the loose fibres into roof and wall spaces.

Despite a removal program asbestos fibres have now been found to have infiltrated living spaces, posing a health hazard and leading to houses being abandoned.

A long-time south-west resident has recalled there was a Mr Fluffy agent operating in the Warrnambool area about the same time.

The Standard has since contacted a number of long-time residents and confirmed there was an agent operating in the area.

One recalled a door-to-door salesman calling at his parents’ Grassmere farm trying to sell the product. They didn’t, but said it was installed in at least one house in the Grassmere area.

It is unknown whether the Mr Fluffy businesses were linked or if the product was the same as that installed in Canberra houses.

Other blow-in products have been used, including shredded paper treated with a fire retardant chemical, and wool.

South-west asbestos removal professionals said they had not encountered loose-fill asbestos in the region.

Warrnambool licensed asbestos removalist Andrew Morrison said he had not come across the Mr Fluffy product in the seven years he’s been in the business, or in the couple of years he worked for another operator.

“I have seen some blow-in products but I haven’t seen asbestos,” Mr Morrison said.

“That doesn’t mean it wasn’t used in the area.”

Fourteen NSW councils are also investigating if the product was used in their areas.

Original source:

Loose asbestos home insulation fears

Asbestos found at Porirua kindergarten


Asbestos found at Porirua kindergarten


RHIANNON MCCONNELL

Last updated 10:25 01/04/2014

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RHIANNON MCCONNELL/FAIRFAX NZ

DANGEROUS FIND: Kyle Mitchell points out asbestos found at his daughter’s kindergarten in Pukerua Bay.

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A parent at a kindergarten north of Wellington was shocked to discover children playing around asbestos.


Do you have more information? Email us at editor@kmananews.co.nz


Builder Kyle Mitchell was in the garden at Pukerua Bay Kindergarten, in Porirua with his daughter when he noticed pieces of asbestos protruding from the ground.

“I pulled a big piece out,” he said. “I was pretty shocked. That’s pretty dubious stuff. The kids have actually been running on it.”

The father of three raised his concerns with teachers.

“It’s bloody terrible that the kids have been have been exposed to the hazardous substance for some time.”

Barriers were put up by the kindergarten and a removal specialist was called in last Thursday afternoon.

Pukerua Bay Kindergarten head teacher Carrie-Ann Stark would not discuss the issue. When asked for a kindergarten committee spokesperson, she said that was her too, but she still would not comment.

Wellington Kindergartens Association spokeswoman Jenny Varney, who said she was also speaking on behalf of the kindergarten, said the kindergarten acted quickly after learning of the asbestos.

“Forty-eight hours from whoa to go it was gone. It was identified and removed,” she said.

“Many years ago we disposed of things very differently than we do now. It is a historic thing and we can only carefully monitor it.”

The kindergarten was established in 1977.

Varney said she believed rain had recently uncovered the material and she did not believe anyone had been at risk.

“We are always concerned about pupils’ safety, but there’s no reason to believe anyone has come in contact with [the asbestos] in the past.”

Mitchell said the asbestos did not look as if it had been uncovered recently.

“It’s been there for years. Some of it’s been sticking out for ages,” he said. “It should have been cleaned up.”

He suspected the area was once used as a dumping ground.

“I spoke to one of the teachers and they said that in the past they had also found big shards of glass and that it must have been some sort of dumping ground and [the kindergarten] never bothered to have the play area cleared of this rubbish.”

Mitchell said the clean-up was a good start, but the area needed to be fully checked and cleared for it to be safe.

His wife, Rachael, said the kindergarten was focused on safety and she believed it would do what was best for the children.


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“My view is they weren’t aware of asbestos there and as soon as they were they went into protection mode.”

Varney said the kindergarten did not believe there was any more danger, but it would be careful.

“We would be foolish not to keep an eye on things,” she said. “Now that this happened we will be extra vigilant.”

‘I’LL BE BANNING MY KIDS’

Lower Hutt GP Stewart Reid said it would be very hard to be sure if the children at Pukerua Bay Kindergarten had been exposed to asbestos.

“I don’t think there’s any way you can detect if any significant exposure has occurred,” he said. “The issue is that nothing much happens until many years later.

“If it was me, I’d be banning my kids from being near there.” Reid said asbestos was only dangerous if inhaled. “If it is in a garden, there is a reasonable chance that some of it could break down and get dusty. “If there is no asbestos dust it is OK,” he said.

WHAT IS ASBESTOS?

Asbestos is a group of minerals made up of many small fibres. It is a risk to health when breathed in as dust.

Fibres can get stuck in the lungs and body, leading to breathing difficulties and even lung cancer.

If asbestos is exposed or damaged it can be dangerous.

Before the dangers were known, it was popular because of its fire- resistant, insulation and reinforcement properties. It became popular in the 19th century as a cheap building material. Many old buildings in New Zealand contain asbestos. Its use is banned in many places.

– Kapi-Mana News


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Asbestos found at Porirua kindergarten

Asbestos warning sign at Clements causes concern for students and parents

CLEMENTS, Ala. (WAAY)- An asbestos waring sign posted Tuesday at Clements High School is causing concern for students and parents. But school officials claim students are not in any danger as crews remove the cancer causing material from the school.

The sign warning of cancer and lung disease caused a flood of phone calls from parents concerned for students health and safety.

The sign is posted to plastic and plywood blocking a wing of classrooms. It is easily seen as students pass the hallway on their way to and from classes. The sign states “Danger Asbestos. Cancer and lung disease hazard. Authorized personnel only. Respirators and protective clothing are required in this area.”

“The students were mistaken because it said danger respirators and breathing devices needed in this area. They did not understand that meant the area behind the signs that has been sealed off, not the hallways in which they’re walking” said Clements Principal Keith Hairrell.

Behind the sealed area, crews are removing old floor tiles that contain some levels of asbestos. The wing has been sealed from the rest of the school. Hairrell said only certain areas of the school need those tiles removed.

“The company that has been hired to do this is nationally accredited. We use a forced vacuum system. They create vapor barriers. They put up plastic barriers” said Limestone County Schools Superintendent Tom Sisk.

The asbestos removal is small part of $5.4 million in renovations that began Monday at the school and will continue for the next year. When the renovations are complete, the school will be remodeled inside and out.

“At no time are kids at risk” said Sisk. “We wouldn’t be allowed to do it first off. The state wouldn’t let us do it. Federal would let us do it. I want to reassure families that the process is the process but it’s a safe one.”

Sisk says the signs have to legally be posted to signify that the work is being done.

“The precautions are there and it’s a very costly process because we’re doing it by the book” said Sisk.

Hairrell said teachers plan to talk with the students on Thursday to assure them there is no danger.

“There is no risk to any of our students, our staff, our visitors, or parents on this campus” said Hairrell.

Continued: 

Asbestos warning sign at Clements causes concern for students and parents