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December 13, 2018

Asbestos found at former school site

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Asbestos found at former school site

Mr Fluffy homes can be demolished safely, asbestos taskforce head Andrew Kefford says

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“It is possible to demolish a house with loose-fill asbestos safely and without there being a risk to neighbouring property,” he said. “It’s an area of work which is very heavily regulated and at the point where the houses are actually being knocked over, either the lose-fill asbestos has been removed or it has been bonded to the structures so the prospect of the fibres escaping is being controlled.”

He pointed to a demolition of a Fluffy house in Woden in July, where he said asbestos removalists had worked for a fortnight before the building was knocked over to remove the remaining fibres and glue the rest to the structure, so by the time it was knocked over it was safe. Dust-suppression measures would be in place during demolition, along with air monitoring.

“The whole thing is designed so at the point it is actually knocked over, the fibres are controlled and there is active dust suppression and active air monitoring to make sure that it’s working,” he said.

With the Woden home, the internal walls were removed so the remaining fibres could be taken out before demolition, but the taskforce has been considering how to handle double-brick houses, where the load-bearing wall is on the inside, so the outside wall must come off first to clean asbestos from the wall cavities. Mr Kefford confirmed some would have to be “bubble wrapped” – effectively enclosed in a tent – but for others, it would be safe to use technologies such as foam products, glue and water suppression to prevent fibres escaping.

“It is possible to demolish a double-brick house safely and not necessarily by putting it in a bubble,” he said. “It is something we are continuing to explore, but all of the advice we’re getting from the industry is it can be done safely.”

Each house would be assessed separately and have a demolition plan in place.

“If the advice is this house needs a bubble because it’s so bad, then there will be a bubble.”

Asked about an exclusion zone around houses, he said “the bloke standing on site spraying dust suppression might wear a suit”, but “the whole process is designed from beginning to end to prevent fibres from escaping”.

Once the house was down, 10 centimetres of soil would be removed from under the footprint of the house and a little wider, then the soil would be tested. If it showed asbestos fibres, “you keep digging and then you test again”.

“This is a heavily regulated process. At the point that the asbestos assessor is prepared to sign off that the site is clean, they stop digging.”

In the Downer demolition last year, 30 centimetres of soil had been removed. In Woden, testing had been clear after 10 centimetres.

“You need to be in a position to say this block has been remediated, which means we tested, we didn’t find anything, we replaced the dirt to ground level with clean fill and this block is now remediated,” he said.

“We’re getting a lot of questions about this, but the point is it can be done safely. It is a very tightly regulated space and at the end of that process it is possible to say that it’s been done properly and safely.”

The government is considering a buyback and demolition of the 1000 homes.











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Mr Fluffy homes can be demolished safely, asbestos taskforce head Andrew Kefford says

Asbestos warning after fly-tipping on beauty spot

Warnings signs had been placed on Surrey Wildlife Common after material containing asbestos which can lead to cancer was dumped there

Material containing asbestos has been dumped near to a Guildford pond on Surrey Wildlife Common.

Guildford Borough Council is investigating the issue, and believes it could have been left along Keen’s Lane on Chitty’s Common in Worplesdon on Sunday July 28 or Monday July 29.

The bags were left around one metre away from the pond at the Surrey Wildlife Trust common, and yellow tape warning of asbestos had been put around them, before it was removed this week.

Exposure to asbestos can lead to cancer and scarring of the lungs.

It is safe if undamaged or undisturbed, but needs to be disposed of correctly.

A spokesman for the borough council said they were looking for any information relating to suspicious vehicle movements seen in the area around Sunday July 28 and Monday July 29.

“We are aware of the issue and it has been passed onto our specialist contractors to deal with,” the spokesman said.

“In this case it was reported to us on Tuesday July 29 so probably appeared either on Sunday night or some time on Monday.

“There is very little indication as to where this came from and who left it there.”

Surrey Wildlife Trust said it was also aware of the asbestos, and warned of the dangers of fly-tipping in general.

“Asbestos fibres are so small that they cannot be seen by the naked eye or even by normal household microscopes, but when asbestos is dumped and released into the environment it contaminates the air, where it can be inhaled, water, where it can be ingested, and soil,” a spokesman for the trust said.

“Asbestos dust can easily travel for long distances in the air before it settles into water or on top of soil, thus contaminating areas far away from its source.

“The small asbestos fibres remain intact in air, water and soil. It does not break down or biodegrade.

“The fibres do not absorb into the soil and instead sit on top of the soil, where it can easily be disturbed and redistributed into the air, which will have an impact on native flora.

“It can also settle on the surface of the soil instead of getting absorbed into the ground, which means that it can still get picked up by the wind and inhaled into human lungs, which pose the biggest risks.

“Fly-tipping can be harmful to wildlife and the environment, as animals can get stuck inside discarded waste, and chemicals in items such as paint, battery acid and pesticide and leach into the ground and waterways.

“It can crush wild flowers and may introduce non-native species that may take over the natural environment,” the spokesman said.

“Even the most innocent dumping of a few grass clippings encourages others to do the same.

“This can result in household refuse also being dumped.”

Up until February this year, there had been more than 5,600 incidents of fly-tipping reported in Guildford in the previous five years.

Asbestos must be removed by a licensed company, and in Guildford some types can be disposed of at the Guildford Community Recycling Centre at Slyfield Industrial Estate.

For anyone who finds fly-tipping or suspects waste to contain asbestos, the advice is to notify the local authority, which can be contacted by calling 01483 505050.

Originally posted here – 

Asbestos warning after fly-tipping on beauty spot

Quake victim not told about asbestos for three months

Quake victim not told about asbestos for three months

Published: 6:19AM Saturday February 15, 2014 Source: ONE News

A Christchurch homeowner is outraged that positive results from asbestos testing at his home were not passed on to him until months after they were available.

The slip-up has been slammed by health officials and has drawn an apology from those responsible.

Tom Davies has lived in his now “badly damaged” home through almost 13,000 earthquakes.

But until recently he was unaware that he did so with the threat of deadly asbestos right above him. He showed ONE News where his ceiling was drilled for asbestos tests.

EQR, who manage Earthquake Commission repairs, ordered testing in October last year. Documents show that the positive results were known on October 22 and the information was forwarded to EQR the following day.

“One would’ve thought that if there is asbestos in the property, or asbestos in the area, that they would tell you immediately,” Mr Davies says.

They didn’t, and in fact Mr Davies was not told until January 27, three months after the results were known.

“They should be getting in touch with them promptly and offering them options to move out,” says Dr Alistair Humphrey, Canterbury Medical Officer of Health.

In a statement, Fletchers EQR admit that there was an error in communication. They say it is their policy to contact homeowners as quickly as possible. However they deny that there was any heightened risk to occupants.

Experts are advising Mr Davies not to take any chances, until he’s sure his home is safe.

“My advice and our advice always to anyone living in a home where there is friable asbestos is get out as fast as you can,” says Dr Humphrey.

Mr Davies is not sure his insurance company would pay for him to move.



I am paying a mortgage on this house. Could I afford a rental on top of a mortgage? I’m not sure that I could just at the moment.”

The long-term future for the house is looking better with the asbestos scheduled to be removed.

The long term effect on Tom Davies’ health, however, remains to be seen.

    Copyright © 2014, Television New Zealand Limited. Breaking and Daily News, Sport & Weather | TV ONE, TV2 | Ondemand

    Link: 

    Quake victim not told about asbestos for three months

    Asbestos Advice Helpline Welcome New Fund for Mesothelioma Compensation

    These new proposals represent a significant improvement when compared to the current level of provision

    (PRWEB UK) 5 December 2013

    The Asbestos Advice Helpline, a celebrated team of dedicated asbestos litigators, has applauded a new decision which means that thousands of mesothelioma sufferers over the next 10 years will be able to claim from a £350 million fund to attain some measure of recompense for their damages. Described as a significant breakthrough, the amendments mean that sufferers who were previously disqualified from claiming compensation may now be eligible to do so.

    Mesothelioma is an invariably lethal disease that typically overcomes its victims within an average timeframe of 9 months following diagnosis. The mesothelioma condition is almost exclusively confined to those professions that came into regular contact with asbestos dust prior to the substance being banned at the end of the 1990s, and more than 2,000 people die every year due to its influence. The quantity of reported incidents is only expected to increase over the next 3 years, and the number of deaths is expected to total in excess of 60,000.

    A spokesperson from the Asbestos Advice Helpline has said: “These new proposals represent a significant improvement when compared to the current level of provision. In previous years, many victims have been inexcusably left without adequate support following a mesothelioma diagnosis, and this scheme goes some way towards rectifying a situation that has been in sore need of attention for a number of decades”.

    Previously, a pair of relevant legislations has allowed mesothelioma claims to be placed up to an average of £20,000. Should the new fund attain parliamentary approval, this amount is anticipated to rise to heights of £115,000. Current government predictions suggest that more than 1000 sufferers will be able to receive this assistance in the next decade and, should the currently debated Mesothelioma Bill be passed without incident, the first payments could well materialise within a maximum of 8 months.

    A degree of discontent has been voiced due to proposals that may implement a cut-off point for those claimants who are able to take advantage of the new fund, although the government have stated that an indiscriminate arrangement would be financially unviable. Despite the fund being restricted to sufferers of mesothelioma, and no further provision planned for those who are afflicted with alternative conditions, many campaign groups have hailed the legislation as a considerable degree of progress. The spokesperson from Asbestos Advice Helpline added that: “We welcome these reforms as a notable step in the right direction, and sincerely hope that, in time, they will be able to be expanded to incorporate all asbestos related conditions”.

    The Asbestos Advice Helpline was established to help those suffering from asbestos related diseases and individuals who may be entitled to make a claim for compensation. The Asbestos Advice Helpline operates on a no win, no fee policy to help those afflicted (and their families) to deal with the legal procedures of making a claim. Asbestos was widely used before its ban and has affected many trade professionals who worked with it at the time; as well as people who may have come into contact with it since without knowing. Asbestos kills around 4,500 people a year from related diseases including asbestosis, mesothelioma and lung cancer.

    The new fund for mesothelioma compensation means that more sufferers from this incredibly serious disease can now take advantage of the compensation that they deserve. For more information, to place a claim with the Asbestos Advice Helpline or to contact them about any of their professional services, visit http://www.asbestosadvicehelpline.com or call the Asbestos Advice Helpline team on 0800 088 7396.


    Continued here: 

    Asbestos Advice Helpline Welcome New Fund for Mesothelioma Compensation

    Asbestos Advice Helpline Expect Increase in Mesothelioma Claims; Release Infographic to Promote Awareness

    Asbestos Advice Helpline Expect Increase in Mesothelioma Claims; Release Infographic to Promote Awareness

    Claims for mesothelioma compensation are expected to increase as diagnosed cases continue to rise towards an expected peak in 2016 and the Mesothelioma Bill makes its way to the House of Commons. The Asbestos Advice Helpline are keen to promote awareness of the disease and have released an infographic for public information.

    Anybody diagnosed with mesothelioma should start looking into a claim without delay

    (PRWEB UK) 10 September 2013

    Cases of mesothelioma are continuing to rise towards an expected peak of male cases in 2016 as forecast by the Health & Safety Executive (http://www.hse.gov.uk/research/rrpdf/rr876.pdf, published in 2011), and as diagnosed cases rise the Asbestos Advice Helpline expect that claims for compensation will also rise accordingly. In addition, the Mesothelioma Bill (http://services.parliament.uk/bills/2013-14/mesothelioma.html, accessed 29/08/2013), which has passed the House of Lords and is currently awaiting its first reading in the House of Commons, is expected to aid compensation efforts for those who cannot trace the relevant insurer or employer. To ensure public awareness the Asbestos Advice Helpline have released an infographic detailing the effects of the disease, which can be seen at http://www.asbestosadvicehelpline.com/uncategorized/the-facts-about-mesothelioma/.

    Asbestos Advice Helpline spokesperson Linda Fletcher said: “Mesothelioma is a deadly disease which manifests many years after initial exposure and although the use of asbestos has been banned in the UK since 1988, cases are still rising. In most cases, mesothelioma is fatal within 12 months of diagnosis so we believe that it is vital to ensure public awareness to help sufferers gain prompt diagnosis and secure the appropriate compensation to which they and their families are entitled. An infographic is an excellent way to promote awareness, as it can be easily shared and understood.”

    The Asbestos Advice Helpline was established to help those suffering from asbestos related diseases and who may be entitled to make a claim for compensation. The Asbestos Advice Helpline operate on a no win no fee policy to help those afflicted and their families to deal with the legal procedures of making a claim. Asbestos was widely used before its ban and has affected many trade professionals who worked with it at the time, as well as people who may have come into contact with it since without knowing. Asbestos kills around 4,500 people a year from related diseases including asbestosis, mesothelioma and lung cancer.

    Ms. Fletcher added, “The Mesothelioma Bill will assist those who cannot trace the insurer or employer who exposed them. However this will be a fund of last resort. Unfortunately, as currently drafted, the Bill will only provide 75% of the civil compensation to which a claimant would normally be entitled, and it is not expected to come into force until next year. Anybody diagnosed with mesothelioma should start looking into a claim without delay, as in 90% of cases the insurer or employer can be traced and they would be able to claim the full compensation amount.”

    For more information, to make a claim with The Asbestos Advice Helpline, or to contact them about any of their services, visit them at their website, http://www.asbestosadvicehelpline.com.


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    Asbestos Advice Helpline Expect Increase in Mesothelioma Claims; Release Infographic to Promote Awareness

    Asbestos found at Ipswich PCYC

    Topics:

    asbestos,

    ipswich pcyc

    Asbestos found at Ipswich PCYC

    THE hazardous material asbestos has been found at an Ipswich community facility used by children.

    Suspect material was found under an “unused” stage at the Ipswich PCYC on Griffith Rd in May and isolated as a precaution after the advice from an asbestos removal company.

    A sample was taken for analysis and lab results confirmed the presence of asbestos on sheeting at the PCYC on July 16.

    Parents are frustrated they were not informed about the finding.

    One parent told The Queensland Times she received no notification from the PCYC and only learned about the asbestos discovery through a third party. And she said the area in question was occasionally used by children.

    A PCYC spokesperson said advice from asbestos removalists suggested the material would not pose a danger if it was left undisturbed.

    The area will remain sealed and isolated until the asbestos is removed.

    Queensland Police-Citizens Youth Welfare Association CEO Senior Sergeant Rob Fiedler said the asbestos is due to be removed on August 26.

    Snr-Sgt Fielder said any parent, member or staff concerned by the find can contact the club manager for more information.

    “The area is not part of the activities area and the isolation of the area has not caused any disruption to activities and the safety of members of the public or staff,” he said.

    “In any case, an air clearance certificate will be provided to ensure the area is safe prior to completion of works.

    “Activities at the club are not affected and we have taken the necessary precautions. Any parent, member or staff can contact the club manager.”

    Snr-Sgt Fiedler said the asbestos removalists were booked in at the first available appointment.

    If asbestos is disturbed it can release dangerous fine particles of dust containing potentially deadly asbestos fibres.

    Asbestos can now only be removed by licensed operators.

    The Ipswich PCYC first opened 45 years ago.

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    Asbestos found at Ipswich PCYC

    Asbestos More Dangerous to Children Than Adults if Exposed; Asbestos Advice Helpline Looks to Alert Public to Dangers …

    Asbestos More Dangerous to Children Than Adults if Exposed; Asbestos Advice Helpline Looks to Alert Public to Dangers of Exposure

    Recent findings by the Committee on Carcinogenicity posit that asbestos poses an increased danger to children than adults.

    This latest report emphasises the danger of exposure to children, particularly when we take into account that approximately three-quarters of England’s 24,000 schools are estimated to have asbestos in them.

    (PRWEB UK) 4 July 2013

    The Asbestos Advice Helpline are seeking to remind people of the dangers of exposure to asbestos, particularly in the wake of a recent study by the Committee on Carcinogenicity (published 07/06/2013, http://www.iacoc.org.uk/statements/documents/Asbestosinschoolsstatement.pdf) highlighting the increased danger it poses to children.

    Exposure to asbestos can be up to five times more dangerous for a five-year-old than a thirty-year-old, according to a recent study from the Committee on Carcinogenicity published last month. The report was the result of two years of work that admits a “number of uncertainties and gaps”, but nevertheless concludes that “due to the increased life expectancy of children compared to adults, there is an increased lifetime risk of mesothelioma as a result of the long latency period of the disease.”

    Speaking on the report, Linda Fletcher of The Asbestos Advice Helpline said: ‘Asbestos and asbestos related diseases such as mesothelioma are often associated with those over 40, particularly males who have worked or are working in the construction industry. This latest report emphasises the danger of exposure to children, particularly when we take into account that approximately three-quarters of England’s 24,000 schools are estimated to have asbestos in them.’

    The Asbestos Advice Helpline was established to help those suffering from asbestos and asbestos related diseases and may be entitled to make a claim for compensation. Widely used until its ban in 1988, many people might have come into contact with it without realising, not just trade professionals who will have worked with it before the ban. The Asbestos Advice Helpline operate on a no win no fee policy to help those afflicted and their families with the legal procedures of making a claim. Asbestos kills around 4,500 people a year from related diseases including asbestosis, mesothelioma and lung cancer.

    Ms.Fletcher added, ‘As asbestos can often take decades to show signs of damage on the body, it is likely that many children will grow up with the disease as it matures. The current government ruling that it is safer to leave it where it is than remove it needs to be re-evaluated, as even the smallest release of fibres into the air can have massive consequences for any who breathe it in.’

    For more information, to make a claim with The Asbestos Advice Helpline, or to contact them about any of their services, visit them at their website, http://www.asbestosadvicehelpline.com.


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    Asbestos More Dangerous to Children Than Adults if Exposed; Asbestos Advice Helpline Looks to Alert Public to Dangers …