_ap_ufes{"success":true,"siteUrl":"friableasbestos.com","urls":{"Home":"http://friableasbestos.com","Category":"http://friableasbestos.com/category/current-asbestos-news/","Archive":"http://friableasbestos.com/2015/04/","Post":"http://friableasbestos.com/asbestos-firms-ready-to-fight-silvers-slanted-legal-system/","Page":"http://friableasbestos.com/effect-asbestos-mesothelioma/","Nav_menu_item":"http://friableasbestos.com/69/"}}_ap_ufee

December 16, 2017

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization Voices Opposition to the Chemical Safety Improvement Act (CSIA)

WASHINGTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), which combines
education, advocacy and community as the leading U.S. organization
serving as the voice of asbestos victims, today began its formal

opposition to the Chemical Safety Improvement Act (CSIA) with the
release of its position
paper
detailing how the bill is critically flawed. ADAO urges
Congress to stand up to the chemical industry on behalf of asbestos
victims by implementing a ban to end the use, importation, and
exportation of asbestos.

“Asbestos kills. In fact, 10,000 Americans die annually from preventable
asbestos-related diseases. In 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) issued a final rule under Section 6 of the Toxic Substance
Control Act (TSCA) banning most asbestos-containing products,” said
Linda Reinstein, President and Co-Founder of ADAO. “However, that rule
was vacated and remanded by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals and the
asbestos ban was overturned. Thus, TSCA, the principal federal law
governing the use and safety of the thousands of chemicals we are
exposed to in our everyday lives, failed to ban asbestos and
occupational, environmental, and consumer asbestos exposure continues
today.”

“Everyone agrees TSCA must be reformed to enable the EPA to protect
Americans from toxic chemicals; however, the Chemical Safety Improvement
Act (S. 1009) is the wrong bill for the job,” continued Reinstein. “Not
only do the same hurdles that prevented the EPA from banning asbestos in
1989 remain in S. 1009, the bill would also prevent states from taking
steps to complement federal efforts and protect their citizens from
toxic chemicals, such as asbestos.”

ADAO’s position paper details five ways that CSIA fails to give the EPA
the authority it needs to ban asbestos, which are as follows:

  • Next to Impossible to Phase Out or Ban Harmful
    Chemicals
    . The CSIA would make it impossible for the EPA to ban
    or phase out the worst of the worst toxic chemicals on the market.
  • Grossly Inadequate Safety Standard. The
    CSIA’s safety standard would place a heavy burden on the EPA to find
    that a chemical such as asbestos is unsafe, rather than shifting the
    burden to chemical companies to show chemicals are safe.
  • Lack of Deadlines to Ensure Safety. The
    CSIA is virtually devoid of any deadlines that would require the EPA


    to act quickly to assess and restrict the use of harmful chemicals
    such as asbestos.

  • Unworkable Standard of Court Review. The
    CSIA would retain the unworkable standard of court review found in
    TSCA, which ultimately prevented the EPA from being able to ban

    asbestos in 1989.

  • Freeze on State Efforts to Protect People from
    Chemicals
    . The CSIA contains far-reaching language that would
    paralyze states from being able to enforce existing laws, as well as
    pass new ones, to increase protections against harmful chemicals such
    as asbestos.

“Asbestos continues to be used in consumer products throughout the
United States and imported from abroad. The problems discussed in our
position paper represent just a handful of the ways that the CSIA would
fail to deliver meaningful reform,” concluded Reinstein. “For that
reason, the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization, the largest U.S.
independent asbestos victims’ organization, cannot support the bill as
written.”

About ADAO

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was
founded by asbestos victims and their families in 2004. ADAO seeks to
give asbestos victims a united voice to help ensure that their rights
are fairly represented and protected, and raise public awareness about
the dangers of asbestos exposure and the often deadly asbestos-related
diseases. ADAO is funded through voluntary contributions and staffed by
volunteers. For more information, visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org.

Contact:

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization

Doug Larkin

Director of Communications

202-391-1546


doug@asbestosdiseaseawareness.org
www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org

Follow this link: 

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization Voices Opposition to the Chemical Safety Improvement Act (CSIA)

Speak Your Mind

*